Kingdom of Portugal

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Coordinates: 38°42′N9°11′W / 38.700°N 9.183°W / 38.700; -9.183

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Contents

Kingdom of Portugal [lower-alpha 1]

Regnum Portugalliae (Latin)
Reino de Portugal (Portuguese)
1139–1910
Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Portugal 1640-1910 (3).svg
Coat of Arms
Anthem: "Hymno Patriótico" (1808–1826)
"Patriotic Anthem"

Hino da Carta (1826–1910)
"Anthem of the Charter"
Portuguese empire 1800.png
Kingdom of Portugal in 1800
Capital Coimbra
(1139–1255)
Lisbon [a]
(1255–1808)
Rio de Janeiro
(1808–1821)
Lisbon
(1821–1830)
Angra do Heroísmo
(1830–1834)
Lisbon
(1834–1910)
Common languagesOfficial languages:Unofficial languages:
Religion
Majority:
Roman Catholicism (official)
Minority:
Sephardic Judaism [lower-alpha 7]
Islam [lower-alpha 8]
Government Absolute monarchy
(1139–1822; 1823–1826; 1828–1834)
Constitutional monarchy
(1822–1823; 1826–1828; 1834–1910)
Monarch  
 1139–1185
Afonso I (first)
 1908–1910
Manuel II (last)
Prime Minister  
 1834–1835
Marquis of Palmela (first)
 1910
Teixeira de Sousa (last)
Legislature Cortes Gerais
 Upper house
Chamber of Peers
 Lower house
Chamber of Deputies
History 
25 July 1139
1 December 1640
1 February 1908
5 October 1910
Area
1910 (metro)92,391 km2 (35,672 sq mi)
Population
 1910 (metro)
5,969,056
Currency Portuguese dinheiro,
(1139–1433)
Portuguese real
(1433–1910)
ISO 3166 code PT
Preceded by
Succeeded by
PortugueseFlag1095.svg County of Portugal
Flag of the Couto Misto.svg Couto Misto
First Portuguese Republic Flag of Portugal.svg
Empire of Brazil Flag of Empire of Brazil (1822-1870).svg
Canada Royal Standard of King Louis XIV.svg
Dahomey Dahomey kingdom flag.png
Today part of
a. ^ The capital was de facto located at Rio de Janeiro from 1808 to 1821.

The Kingdom of Portugal (Latin : Regnum Portugalliae, Portuguese : Reino de Portugal) was a monarchy on the Iberian Peninsula and the predecessor of modern Portugal. It was in existence from 1139 until 1910. After 1415, it was also known as the Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves , and between 1815 and 1822, it was known as the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves . The name is also often applied to the Portuguese Empire , the realm's extensive overseas colonies.

Portuguese language Romance language that originated in Portugal

Portuguese is a Western Romance language originating in the Iberian Peninsula. It is the sole official language of Portugal, Brazil, Cape Verde, Guinea-Bissau, Mozambique, Angola, and São Tomé and Príncipe. It also has co-official language status in East Timor, Equatorial Guinea and Macau in China. As the result of expansion during colonial times, a cultural presence of Portuguese and Portuguese creole speakers are also found in Goa, Daman and Diu in India; in Batticaloa on the east coast of Sri Lanka; in the Indonesian island of Flores; in the Malacca state of Malaysia; and the ABC islands in the Caribbean where Papiamento is spoken, while Cape Verdean Creole is the most widely spoken Portuguese-based Creole. Reintegrationists maintain that Galician is not a separate language, but a dialect of Portuguese. A Portuguese-speaking person or nation is referred to as "Lusophone" (Lusófono).

Iberian Peninsula Peninsula located in southwest Europe

The Iberian Peninsula, also known as Iberia, is located in the southwest corner of Europe. The peninsula is principally divided between Spain and Portugal, comprising most of their territory. It also includes Andorra, small areas of France, and the British overseas territory of Gibraltar. With an area of approximately 596,740 square kilometres (230,400 sq mi)), it is both the second largest European peninsula by area, after the Scandinavian Peninsula, and by population, after the Balkan Peninsula.

Portugal Republic in Southwestern Europe

Portugal, officially the Portuguese Republic, is a country located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe. It is the westernmost sovereign state of mainland Europe, being bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean and to the north and east by Spain. Its territory also includes the Atlantic archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira, both autonomous regions with their own regional governments.

The nucleus of the Portuguese state was the County of Portugal, established in the 9th century as part of the Reconquista , by Vímara Peres, a vassal of the King of Asturias. The county became part of the Kingdom of León in 1097, and the Counts of Portugal established themselves as rulers of an independent kingdom in the 12th century, following the battle of São Mamede. The kingdom was ruled by the Alfonsine Dynasty until the 1383–85 Crisis, after which the monarchy passed to the House of Aviz.

County of Portugal county in Southwestern Europe between 843-1139

The County of Portugal refers to two successive medieval counties in the region around Braga and Porto, today corresponding to littoral northern Portugal, within which the identity of the Portuguese people formed. The first county existed from the mid-ninth to the mid-eleventh centuries as a vassalage of the Kingdom of Asturias and later the Kingdoms of Galicia and León, before being abolished as a result of rebellion. A larger entity under the same name was then reestablished in the late 11th century and subsequently elevated by its count in the mid-12th century into an independent Kingdom of Portugal.

<i>Reconquista</i> Medieval Christian extended conquest of Muslim areas in the Iberian Peninsula

The Reconquista is a name used in English to describe the period in the history of the Iberian Peninsula of about 780 years between the Umayyad conquest of Hispania in 711 and the fall of the Nasrid kingdom of Granada to the expanding Christian kingdoms in 1492. The completed conquest of Granada was the context of the Spanish voyages of discovery and conquest, and the Americas—the "New World"—ushered in the era of the Spanish and Portuguese colonial empires.

Vímara Peres Count of Portugal

Vímara Peres was a ninth-century nobleman from the Kingdom of Asturias and the first ruler of the County of Portugal.

During the 15th and 16th century, Portuguese exploration established a vast colonial empire. From 1580 to 1640, the Kingdom of Portugal was in personal union with Habsburg Spain.

Portuguese discoveries Portuguese voyages of exploration

Portuguese discoveries are the numerous territories and maritime routes discovered by the Portuguese as a result of their intensive maritime exploration during the 15th and 16th centuries. Portuguese sailors were at the vanguard of European overseas exploration, discovering and mapping the coasts of Africa, Canada, Asia and Brazil, in what became known as the Age of Discovery. Methodical expeditions started in 1419 along West Africa's coast under the sponsorship of prince Henry the Navigator, with Bartolomeu Dias reaching the Cape of Good Hope and entering the Indian Ocean in 1488. Ten years later, in 1498, Vasco da Gama led the first fleet around Africa to India, arriving in Calicut and starting a maritime route from Portugal to India. Portuguese explorations then proceeded to southeast Asia, where they reached Japan in 1542, forty-four years after their first arrival in India. In 1500, the Portuguese nobleman Pedro Álvares Cabral became the first European to discover Brazil.

Portuguese Empire global empire centered in Portugal

The Portuguese Empire, also known as the Portuguese Overseas or the Portuguese Colonial Empire, was one of the largest and longest-lived empires in world history. It existed for almost six centuries, from the capture of Ceuta in 1415, to the handover of Portuguese Macau to China in 1999. The empire began in the 15th century, and from the early 16th century it stretched across the globe, with bases in North and South America, Africa, and various regions of Asia and Oceania. The Portuguese Empire has been described as the first global empire in history, a description also given to the Spanish Empire.

Iberian Union Spanish-Portuguese union between 1580-1640

The Iberian Union was the dynastic union of the Kingdom of Portugal and the Spanish Crown between 1580 and 1640, bringing the entire Iberian Peninsula, as well as Spanish and Portuguese overseas possessions, under the Spanish Habsburg kings Philip II, Philip III and Philip IV. The union began as a result of the Portuguese crisis of succession and the ensuing War of the Portuguese Succession and lasted 60 years, until the Portuguese Restoration War in which the House of Braganza was established as Portugal's new ruling dynasty.

After the Portuguese Restoration War of 1640–1668, the kingdom passed to the House of Braganza and thereafter to the House of Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha. From this time, the influence of Portugal declined, but it remained a major power due to its most valuable colony, Brazil. After the independence of Brazil, Portugal sought to establish itself in Africa, but was ultimately forced to yield to the British interests, leading to the collapse of the monarchy in the 5 October 1910 revolution and the establishment of the First Portuguese Republic.

Portuguese Restoration War 1640-1688 war between Portugal and Spain

The Portuguese Restoration War was the name given by nineteenth-century Romantic historians to the war between Portugal and Spain that began with the Portuguese revolution of 1640 and ended with the Treaty of Lisbon in 1668. The period from 1640 to 1668 was marked by periodic skirmishes between Portugal and Spain, as well as short episodes of more serious warfare, much of it occasioned by Spanish and Portuguese entanglements with non-Iberian powers. Spain was involved in the Thirty Years' War until 1648 and the Franco–Spanish War until 1659, while Portugal was involved in the Dutch–Portuguese War until 1663.

House of Braganza dynasty

The Most Serene House of Braganza, or the Brigantine Dynasty, also known in the Empire of Brazil as the Most August House of Braganza, is a dynasty of emperors, kings, princes, and dukes of Portuguese origin, a cadet branch of the House of Aviz.

House of Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha

The House of Braganza-Saxe-Coburg and Gotha is a term used to categorize the last four rulers of the Kingdom of Portugal, and their families, from 1853 until the declaration of the republic in 1910. Its name derives from the four kings descended in a patrilineal line from King Ferdinand II of Portugal and in a matrilineal line from Queen Maria II of Portugal.

Portugal was a absolute monarchy before 1822. It rotated between absolute and constitutional monarchy from 1822 until 1834, and was a constitutional monarchy after 1834.

Absolute monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the monarch holds supreme authority and where that authority is not restricted by any written laws, legislature, or customs. These are often hereditary monarchies. In contrast, in constitutional monarchies, the head of state's authority derives from and is legally bounded or restricted by a constitution or legislature.

A constitutional monarchy is a form of monarchy in which the sovereign exercises authority in accordance with a written or unwritten constitution. Constitutional monarchy differs from absolute monarchy in that constitutional monarchs are bound to exercise their powers and authorities within the limits prescribed within an established legal framework. Constitutional monarchies range from countries such as Morocco, Jordan, Kuwait and Bahrain, where the constitution grants substantial discretionary powers to the sovereign, to countries such as Japan and Sweden where the monarch retains no formal authorities.

History

Origins

The Kingdom of Portugal finds its origins in the County of Portugal (1093–1139). The Portuguese County was a semi-autonomous county of the Kingdom of León. Independence from León took place in three stages:

  1. The first on 26 July 1139 when Afonso Henriques was acclaimed King of the Portuguese [1] internally.
  2. The second was on 5 October 1143, when Alfonso VII of León and Castile recognized Afonso Henriques as king through the Treaty of Zamora.
  3. The third, in 1179, was the Papal Bull Manifestis Probatum , in which Portugal's independence was recognized by Pope Alexander III.

Once Portugal was independent, D. Afonso I's descendants, members of the Portuguese House of Burgundy, would rule Portugal until 1383. Even after the change in royal houses, all the monarchs of Portugal were descended from Afonso I, one way or another, through both legitimate and illegitimate links.

Medieval history (1139–1415)

Renaissance and early modern history (1415–1777)

Modern history (1777–1910)

Fall of the Monarchy

With the start of the 20th century, Republicanism grew in numbers and support in Lisbon among progressive politicians and the influential press. However a minority with regard to the rest of the country, this height of republicanism would benefit politically from the Lisbon Regicide on 1 February 1908. While returning from the Ducal Palace at Vila Viçosa, King Carlos I and the Prince Royal Luís Filipe were assassinated in the Terreiro do Paço, in Lisbon. With the death of the King and his heir, Carlos I's second son would become monarch as King Manuel II. Manuel's reign, however, would be short-lived, ending by force with the 5 October 1910 revolution, sending Manuel into exile in Great Britain and giving way to the Portuguese First Republic.

On 19 January 1919, the Monarchy of the North was proclaimed in Porto. The monarchy would be deposed a month later and no other monarchist counterrevolution in Portugal has happened since.

After the republican revolution in October 1910, the remaining colonies of the empire became overseas provinces of the Portuguese Republic until the late 20th century, when the last overseas territories of Portugal were handed over (most notably Portuguese Africa which included the overseas provinces of Angola and Mozambique in 1975, and finally Macau in 1999).

Rulers

See also

Footnotes

  1. After 1415, it was also known as the Kingdom of Portugal and the Algarves (Latin: Regnum Portugalliae et Algarbiae, Portuguese: Reino de Portugal e dos Algarves), and between 1815 and 1822, it was known as the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves (Portuguese: Reino Unido de Portugal, Brasil e Algarves).
  2. Galician-Portuguese (until 16th century)
    Modern Portuguese (16th century onward)
  3. Widely used for administrative and liturgical purposes. Medieval Latin replaced by Renaissance Latin by the 15th century.
  4. Until 13th century.
  5. Until 1497, mainly in the Algarve.
  6. Until 1497.
  7. Until 1497.
  8. Until 1497.

Citations

  1. Wilner, Hero, Weiner, p. 190

Related Research Articles

Afonso I of Portugal 12th-century King of Portugal

Afonso I, nicknamed the Conqueror, the Founder or the Great by the Portuguese, and El-Bortukali [in Arabic البرتقالي] and Ibn-Arrink [in Arabic ابن الرَّنك or ابن الرَنْق] by the Moors whom he fought, was the first King of Portugal. He achieved the independence of the southern part of the Kingdom of Galicia, the County of Portugal, from Galicia's overlord, the King of León, in 1139, establishing a new kingdom and doubling its area with the Reconquista, an objective that he pursued until his death in 1185, after forty-six years of wars against the Moors.

Afonso III of Portugal King of Portugal

Afonso III, or Affonso, Alfonso or Alphonso (Portuguese-Galician) or Alphonsus (Latin), the Boulonnais, King of Portugal was the first to use the title King of Portugal and the Algarve, from 1249. He was the second son of King Afonso II of Portugal and his wife, Urraca of Castile; he succeeded his brother, King Sancho II of Portugal, who died on 4 January 1248.

Carlos I of Portugal Portuguese prince

Dom Carlos I known as the Diplomat ; Portuguese: o Diplomata and Portuguese: o Martirizado; 28 September 1863 – 1 February 1908) was the King of Portugal. He was the first Portuguese king to die a violent death since Sebastian in 1578.

Flag of Portugal Flag of a sovereign nation

The flag of Portugal is a rectangular bicolour with a field unevenly divided into green on the hoist, and red on the fly. The lesser version of the national coat of arms is centered over the colour boundary at equal distance from the upper and lower edges. On 30 June 1911, less than a year after the downfall of the constitutional monarchy, this design was officially adopted for the new national flag of the First Portuguese Republic, after selection by a special commission whose members included Columbano Bordalo Pinheiro, João Chagas and Abel Botelho.

Philippine dynasty

The Philippine Dynasty, also known as the House of Habsburg in Portugal, was the third royal house of Portugal. It was named after the three Spanish kings who ruled Portugal between 1581 and 1640 in a dynastic union of the two crowns. The three kings, all named Philip, were from the House of Habsburg.

Timeline of Portuguese history (Fourth Dynasty)

This is a historical timeline of Portugal.

Coat of arms of Portugal coat of arms

The coat of arms of Portugal is the main heraldic insignia of Portugal. The present model was officially adopted on 30 June 1911, along with the present model of the Flag of Portugal. It is based on the coat of arms used by the Portuguese Kingdom since the Middle Ages. The coat of arms of Portugal is popularly referred as the Quinas.

United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves 1815-1822 kingdom in Southwestern Europe and South America

The United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil and the Algarves was a pluricontinental monarchy formed by the elevation of the Portuguese colony named State of Brazil to the status of a kingdom and by the simultaneous union of that Kingdom of Brazil with the Kingdom of Portugal and the Kingdom of the Algarves, constituting a single state consisting of three kingdoms.

Military Order of Saint James of the Sword Portuguese honorific order

The Military Order of Saint James of the Sword is a Portuguese order of chivalry.

Liberal Revolution of 1820

The Liberal Revolution of 1820 was a Portuguese political revolution that erupted in 1820. It began with a military insurrection in the city of Porto, in northern Portugal, that quickly and peacefully spread to the rest of the country. The Revolution resulted in the return in 1821 of the Portuguese Court to Portugal from Brazil, where it had fled during the Peninsular War, and initiated a constitutional period in which the 1822 Constitution was ratified and implemented. The movement's liberal ideas had an important influence on Portuguese society and political organization in the nineteenth century.

Portuguese Cortes

In the Medieval Kingdom of Portugal, the Cortes was an assembly of representatives of the estates of the realm - the nobility, clergy and bourgeoisie. It was called and dismissed by the King of Portugal at will, at a place of his choosing. Cortes which brought all three estates together are sometimes distinguished as Cortes-Gerais, in contrast to smaller assemblies which brought only one or two estates, to negotiate a specific point relevant only to them.

Portuguese House of Burgundy cadet branch of the House of Burgundy

The Portuguese House of Burgundy or the Afonsine Dynasty is a cadet branch of the House of Burgundy, descended from Henry, Count of Portugal. Henry was a younger son of Henry of Burgundy, the son and heir of Robert I of Burgundy who died before he could inherit the Duchy.

Mantle of João VI

The Mantle of João VI, also known as the Mantle of the United Kingdom of Portugal, Brazil, and the Algarves, is the royal robe, a part of the Portuguese Crown Jewels, that was fashioned for the acclamation of King João VI, alongside the Crown of João VI and the Sceptre of the Armillary.

Monarchy of the North

The Monarchy of the North, officially the Kingdom of Portugal, was a short-lived revolution and monarchist government that occurred in the North of Portugal, in early 1919. The movement, also known as the Kingdom of Traulitânia, based in Porto, lasted from 19 January to 13 February 1919.

Portugal in the Middle Ages

The kingdom of Portugal was established from the county of Portugal in the 1130s, ruled by the Portuguese House of Burgundy. During most of the 12th and 13th centuries, its history is chiefly that of the gradual reconquest of territory from the various Muslim principalities (taifas) of the period.

Constituent Cortes of 1820

The Constituent Cortes of 1820, formal title The General and Extraordinary Cortes of the Portuguese Nation, also frequently known as the Sovereign Congress or the Cortes Constituintes Vintistas, was the first modern Portuguese parliament. Created after the Liberal Revolution of 1820 to prepare a constitution for Portugal and its overseas territories, it used a different system from the traditional General Cortes for choosing representatives, and the three traditional feudal estates no longer sat separately. The Cortes sat between January 24, 1821 and November 4, 1822 at the Palácio das Necessidades in Lisbon. The work of the Constitutional Cortes culminated in the approval of the Portuguese Constitution of 1822.

Portuguese Constitution of 1822

The Portuguese Constitution of 1822 approved on 23 September 1822 was the first Portuguese constitution, marking an attempt to end absolutism and introduce a constitutional monarchy. Although it was actually in force only for two brief periods, 1822-23 and 1836-38, it was fundamental to the history of democracy in Portugal. It was replaced by the Constitutional Charter of 1826.

References