Dominion of India

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Dominion of India

1947–1950
Capital New Delhi
Government Federation
King  
 1947–1950
George VI
Governor-General  
 1947–1948
Louis Mountbatten
 1948–1950
Chakravarti Rajagopalachari
Prime Minister  
 1947–1950
Jawaharlal Nehru [2]
Legislature Constituent Assembly
History 
15 August 1947
26 January 1950
Area
19503,287,263 km2 (1,269,219 sq mi)
Currency Indian rupee
ISO 3166 code IN
Preceded by
Succeeded by
British Raj Red Ensign.svg British Raj
Republic of India Flag of India.svg
Part of a series on the
History of India
Satavahana gateway at Sanchi, 1st century CE North Gateway - Rear Side - Stupa 1 - Sanchi Hill 2013-02-21 4480-4481.JPG
Satavahana gateway at Sanchi, 1st century CE

The Union of India, [3] also called the Dominion of India, was an independent dominion in the British Commonwealth of Nations between 15 August 1947 and 26 January 1950. It was created by the Indian Independence Act 1947 and was transformed into the Republic of India by the promulgation of the Constitution of India in 1950. [4]

Contents

The King was represented by the Governor-General of India. However, the Governor-General was not designated Viceroy , as had been customary under the British Raj. The office of Viceroy was abolished on independence. Two governors-general held office between independence and India's transformation into a republic: Louis Mountbatten, 1st Earl Mountbatten of Burma (1947–48) and Chakravarti Rajagopalachari (1948–50). Jawaharlal Nehru was Prime Minister of India throughout.

Formation

Since the late 1920s the Indian independence movement had been demanding Pūrṇa Swarāj (complete self-rule) for the Indian nation and the establishment of the Dominion of India and the Dominion of Pakistan was a major victory for the Swarajis. Nevertheless, the Partition was controversial among the people, and resulted in significant political instability and displacement. [5]

The 1946 Cabinet Mission to India proposed 'Union of India' as a political unit that would encompass both British India and the Indian princely states. [6] The Mission's plan did not come into fruition due to disagreements over the powers to be held by the Union government. On 3 June 1947, it was decided that British India would be partitioned into two sovereign states, both dominions: Pakistan, consisting of Muslim-majority regions, and India, consisting of the rest. In deference to the wishes of Indian National Congress, it was accepted that the partition would be regarded as the Muslim majority areas splitting off from India. [7]

The Partition of took place on 15 August 1947, [8] leading to the creation of Pakistan (which later split into the Islamic Republic of Pakistan and the People's Republic of Bangladesh in 1971) and India (later the Republic of India).

Most of the 565 [9] princely states within Indian territory acceded to the Dominion of India. The Hindu-majority Junagadh State located in modern-day Gujarat attempted to accede to Pakistan under Nawab Sir Muhammad Mahabat Khanji III, who was a Muslim. It was annexed militarily by the Indian government. Similarly, the State of Hyderabad sought to remain independent and was also annexed by India in 1948. [5]

History

Conflict with Pakistan

The newly created states of Pakistan and India both joined the Commonwealth, a platform for cooperation between the countries that had been part of the British Empire. Nevertheless, they soon found themselves at war beginning in October 1947, over the contested princely state of Jammu and Kashmir. Pakistani militants entered the state, alarming Maharaja Hari Singh who appealed to India for military intervention, in exchange for the signing of the Instrument of Accession and annexation into India. The region is contested to this day and two other Indo-Pakistan wars occurred as part of the Kashmir conflict. [5]

The Dominion of India began working towards a constitution based on liberal democracy immediately after independence.

Republic of India

The Constituent Assembly adopted the Constitution of India, drafted by a committee headed by B. R. Ambedkar, on 26 November 1949. India abolished the role of the constitutional monarchy and became a federal, democratic republic after its constitution came into effect on 26 January 1950; henceforth celebrated as Republic Day. The governmental structure was similar to that of the United Kingdom but within a federal system. Rajendra Prasad became the first President of India.

Government

List of Governors-General

Name
(birth–death)
PictureTook officeLeft officeAppointer
Governors-General India, 1947–1950
The Viscount Mountbatten of Burma [10]
(1900–1979)
Admiral of the Fleet Earl Mountbatten of Burma TR1228.jpg 15 August 194721 June 1948 George VI
Chakravarti Rajagopalachari
(1878–1972)
C Rajagopalachari 1944.jpg 21 June 194826 January 1950

List of prime ministers

Name
(birth–death); constituency
PortraitParty
(Alliance)
Term of office [11] Elections
(Lok Sabha)
Council of
Ministers
Appointed by
Jawaharlal Nehru
(1889–1964)
MP for Phulpur
Jnehru.jpg Indian National Congress 15 August
1947
26 January
1950
Nehru I Lord Mountbatten

See also

Related Research Articles

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Governor-General of India position

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1dates1947

Events in the year 1948 in India.

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The Indo-Pakistani War of 1947–1948, sometimes known as the First Kashmir War, was fought between India and Pakistan over the princely state of Jammu and Kashmir from 1947 to 1948. It was the first of four Indo-Pakistan Wars fought between the two newly independent nations. Pakistan precipitated the war a few weeks after independence by launching tribal lashkar (militia) from Waziristan, in an effort to capture Kashmir, the future of which hung in the balance. The inconclusive result of the war still affects the geopolitics of both countries.

Princely state Type of vassal state in British India

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Rajpramukh

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Instrument of Accession Treaty for princely states to join India or Pakistan

The Instrument of Accession was a legal document first introduced by the Government of India Act 1935 and used in 1947 to enable each of the rulers of the princely states under British paramountcy to join one of the new dominions of India or Pakistan created by the Partition of British India.

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References

  1. 1 2 "Press Communique' - State Emblem" (PDF). Press Information Bureau of India - Archive. Archived (PDF) from the original on 24 February 2018.
  2. As Prime Minister of India until 1964.
    • Winegard, Timothy C. (2011), Indigenous Peoples of the British Dominions and the First World War, Cambridge University Press, p. 2, ISBN   978-1-107-01493-0 Quote: “The first collective use (of the word "dominion") occurred at the Colonial Conference (April to May 1907) when the title was conferred upon Canada and Australia. New Zealand and Newfoundland were afforded the designation in September of that same year, followed by South Africa in 1910. These were the only British possessions recognized as Dominions at the outbreak of war. In 1922, the Irish Free State was given Dominion status, followed by the short-lived inclusion of India and Pakistan in 1947 (although India was officially recognized as the Union of India). The Union of India became the Republic of India in 1950, while the became the Islamic Republic of Pakistan in 1956.”
  3. Winegard, Timothy C. (2011), Indigenous Peoples of the British Dominions and the First World War, Cambridge University Press, pp. 2–, ISBN   978-1-107-01493-0
  4. 1 2 3 India: A History. New York, USA: Grove Press. 2000. ISBN   978-0-8021-3797-5.
  5. Menon, Vapal Pangunni (2015), Transfer of Power in India, Princeton University Press, p. 264, ISBN   978-1-4008-7937-3
  6. Pande, Aparna (2011), Explaining Pakistan’s Foreign Policy: Escaping India, Routledge, p. 178, note 52, ISBN   978-1-136-81894-3
  7. Section 1 of the Indian Independence Act, 1947
  8. "Indian Princely States before 1947 A-J".
  9. Created Earl Mountbatten of Burma on 28 October 1947.
  10. "Former Prime Ministers". PM India. Retrieved 2 January 2015.