1086

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1086 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1086
MLXXXVI
Ab urbe condita 1839
Armenian calendar 535
ԹՎ ՇԼԵ
Assyrian calendar 5836
Balinese saka calendar 1007–1008
Bengali calendar 493
Berber calendar 2036
English Regnal year 20  Will. 1   21  Will. 1
Buddhist calendar 1630
Burmese calendar 448
Byzantine calendar 6594–6595
Chinese calendar 乙丑(Wood  Ox)
3782 or 3722
     to 
丙寅年 (Fire  Tiger)
3783 or 3723
Coptic calendar 802–803
Discordian calendar 2252
Ethiopian calendar 1078–1079
Hebrew calendar 4846–4847
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1142–1143
 - Shaka Samvat 1007–1008
 - Kali Yuga 4186–4187
Holocene calendar 11086
Igbo calendar 86–87
Iranian calendar 464–465
Islamic calendar 478–479
Japanese calendar Ōtoku 3
(応徳3年)
Javanese calendar 990–991
Julian calendar 1086
MLXXXVI
Korean calendar 3419
Minguo calendar 826 before ROC
民前826年
Nanakshahi calendar −382
Seleucid era 1397/1398 AG
Thai solar calendar 1628–1629
Tibetan calendar 阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1212 or 831 or 59
     to 
阳火虎年
(male Fire-Tiger)
1213 or 832 or 60
Pope Victor III (c. 1026-1087) Pope Victor III.jpg
Pope Victor III (c. 1026–1087)

Year 1086 ( MLXXXVI ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

By place

Europe

October 23 is the 296th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 69 days remain until the end of the year.

The Battle of Sagrajas, also called Zalaca or Zallaqa, was a battle between the Almoravid army led by the Almoravid king Yusuf ibn Tashfin and an army led by the Castilian King Alfonso VI. The battleground was later called az-Zallaqah because the warriors were slipping all over the ground due to the tremendous amount of blood shed that day, which gave rise to its name in Arabic.

Kingdom of Castile Medieval state in the Iberian Peninsula

The Kingdom of Castile was a large and powerful state located on the Iberian Peninsula during the Middle Ages. Its name comes from the host of castles constructed in the region. It began in the 9th century as the County of Castile, an eastern frontier lordship of the Kingdom of León. During the 10th century its counts increased their autonomy, but it was not until 1065 that it was separated from León and became a kingdom in its own right. Between 1072 and 1157 it was again united with León, and after 1230 this union became permanent. Throughout this period the Castilian kings made extensive conquests in southern Iberia at the expense of the Islamic principalities. The Kingdoms of Castile and of León, with their southern acquisitions, came to be known collectively as the Crown of Castile, a term that also came to encompass overseas expansion.

England

  • August 1 King William I (the Conqueror) calls for a meeting at Old Sarum, where he invites his major vassals and tenants-in-chief to swear allegiance to him. The oath is known as the Oath of Salisbury.
  • The Domesday Book is completed, which is drawn up on the orders of William I. It describes in detail the landholdings and resources in England.
  • The population in England is estimated to be 1.25 million citizens with 10% living in boroughs. [2]

August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 152 days remain until the end of the year.

William I, usually known as William the Conqueror and sometimes William the Bastard, was the first Norman King of England, reigning from 1066 until his death in 1087. A descendant of Rollo, he was Duke of Normandy from 1035 onward. After a long struggle to establish his power, by 1060 his hold on Normandy was secure, and he launched the Norman conquest of England six years later. The rest of his life was marked by struggles to consolidate his hold over England and his continental lands and by difficulties with his eldest son.

Old Sarum site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury in England

Old Sarum is the site of the earliest settlement of Salisbury in England. Located on a hill about 2 miles (3 km) north of modern Salisbury near the A345 road, the settlement appears in some of the earliest records in the country. It is an English Heritage property and is open to the public.

Seljuk Empire

Kutalmışoglu Suleiman founded an independent Seljuq Turkish state in Anatolia and ruled as Seljuq Sultan of Rûm from 1077 until his death in 1086.

Sultanate of Rum Seljuq Sultanate in Western Anatolia

The Sultanate of Rûm (also known as the Rûm sultanate, Anatolian Seljuk Sultanate, Sultanate of Iconium, Anatolian Seljuk State or Turkey Seljuk State was a Turko-Persian Sunni Muslim state established in the parts of Anatolia which had been conquered from the Byzantine Empire by the Seljuk Empire, which was established by the Seljuk Turks. The name Rûm was a synonym for Greek, as it remains in modern Turkish, although it derives from the Arabic name for Romans, الرُّومُ ar-Rūm, itself a loan from Greek Ῥωμαῖοι, "Romans"; ie. citizens superordinate to Latin-speakers.

Abu Sa'id Taj ad-Dawla Tutush I was the Seljuq emir of Damascus from 1078 to 1092, and Seljuq sultan of Damascus from 1092 to 1094.

By topic

Religion

May 24 is the 144th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 221 days remain until the end of the year.

Pope Victor III pope

Pope Victor III, born Dauferio, was Pope from 24 May 1086 to his death in 1087. He was the successor of Pope Gregory VII, yet his pontificate is far less impressive in history than his time as Desiderius, the great Abbot of Montecassino.

Pope Gregory VII Pope from 1073 to 1085

Pope Gregory VII, born Hildebrand of Sovana, was pope from 22 April 1073 to his death in 1085.

Births

April 24 is the 114th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 251 days remain until the end of the year.

Ramiro II of Aragon King of aragon

Ramiro II, called the Monk, was King of Aragon from 1134 until withdrawing from public life in 1137. He was the youngest son of Sancho Ramírez, King of Aragon and Navarre and Felicia of Roucy.

Kingdom of Aragon medieval and early modern kingdom in the Iberian Peninsula

The Kingdom of Aragon was a medieval and early modern kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula, corresponding to the modern-day autonomous community of Aragon, in Spain. It should not be confused with the larger Crown of Aragon, that also included other territories — the Principality of Catalonia, the Kingdom of Valencia, the Kingdom of Majorca, and other possessions that are now part of France, Italy, and Greece — that were also under the rule of the King of Aragon, but were administered separately from the Kingdom of Aragon.

Deaths

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Year 1080 (MLXXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1095 Year

Year 1095 (MXCV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

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1060 Year

Year 1060 (MLX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

980 Year

Year 980 (CMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

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Year 997 (CMXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1074 Year

Year 1074 (MLXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1075 Year

Year 1075 (MLXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1077 Year

Year 1077 (MLXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1083 Year

Year 1083 (MLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

985 Year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

916 Year

Year 916 (CMXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

912 Year

Year 912 (CMXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Dobson, R. B. (2000). Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages. New York: Routledge. p. 1349. ISBN   1-57958-282-6.
  2. W.G. Hoskins, "The Making of the English Landscape", Hodder & Stoughton 1955, also Pelican Books 1970.