1009

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1009 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1009
MIX
Ab urbe condita 1762
Armenian calendar 458
ԹՎ ՆԾԸ
Assyrian calendar 5759
Balinese saka calendar 930–931
Bengali calendar 416
Berber calendar 1959
English Regnal year N/A
Buddhist calendar 1553
Burmese calendar 371
Byzantine calendar 6517–6518
Chinese calendar 戊申(Earth  Monkey)
3705 or 3645
     to 
己酉年 (Earth  Rooster)
3706 or 3646
Coptic calendar 725–726
Discordian calendar 2175
Ethiopian calendar 1001–1002
Hebrew calendar 4769–4770
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1065–1066
 - Shaka Samvat 930–931
 - Kali Yuga 4109–4110
Holocene calendar 11009
Igbo calendar 9–10
Iranian calendar 387–388
Islamic calendar 399–400
Japanese calendar Kankō 6
(寛弘6年)
Javanese calendar 911–912
Julian calendar 1009
MIX
Korean calendar 3342
Minguo calendar 903 before ROC
民前903年
Nanakshahi calendar −459
Seleucid era 1320/1321 AG
Thai solar calendar 1551–1552
Tibetan calendar 阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1135 or 754 or −18
     to 
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
1136 or 755 or −17
Emperor Ly Thai To (r. 1009-1028) Tuong Ly Thai To.jpg
Emperor Lý Thái Tổ (r. 1009–1028)

Year in topic Year 1009 ( MIX ) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. Examples include 1949, 1955, 1966, 1977, 1983, 1994, 2005, 2011 and 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in May. Leap years starting on Friday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

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Europe

February 14 is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 320 days remain until the end of the year.

March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 297 days remain until the end of the year.

Name of Lithuania Etymology of "Lietuva"

The first known record of the name of Lithuania is in a 9 March 1009 story of Saint Bruno recorded in the Quedlinburg Chronicle. The Chronicle recorded a Latinized form of the Russian word for Lithuania - Литва (Litva). Although it is clear the name originated from a Baltic language, scholars still debate the meaning of the word.

England

Vikings Norse explorers, warriors, merchants, and pirates

Vikings were Norsemen who, from the late 8th to late 11th centuries, raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of Europe, and explored westwards to Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to include the inhabitants of Norse home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age, 798–1066 AD. This period of Nordic military, mercantile and demographic expansion constitutes an important element in the early medieval history of Scandinavia, Estonia, the British Isles, France, Kievan Rus' and Sicily.

Sweyn Forkbeard 11th-century King of Denmark, England, and Norway

Sweyn Forkbeard was king of Denmark from 986 to 1014. He was the father of King Harald II of Denmark, King Cnut the Great and Queen Estrid Svendsdatter.

Kingdom of England Historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Asia

Gang Jo was a Goryeo general who served under King Mokjong of Goryeo and King Hyeonjong of Goryeo. General Gang Jo was a general in charge of the Northern border army.

Mokjong of Goryeo was the seventh ruler of the Goryeo dynasty of Korea.

Exile event by which a person is forced away from home

To be in exile means to be away from one's home, while either being explicitly refused permission to return or being threatened with imprisonment or death upon return.

By topic

Religion

Pope John XVIII pope of the Catholic Church

Pope John XVIII was Pope and ruler of the Papal states from January 1004 to his abdication in June 1009. He was born Giovanni Fassano at Rome, the son of a Roman priest, either named Leo according to Johann Peter Kirsch, or named Ursus according to Horace K Mann.

Pontificate is the form of government used in Vatican City. The word came to English from French and simply means Papacy or "To perform the functions of the Pope or other high official in the Church." Since there is only one Bishop of Rome, or Pope, pontificate is sometimes also used to describe the era of a Pope. It must not be confused with the Holy See, which since ancient times referred to the episcopal see of Rome, while the Pontificate in the Vatican City is the type of government used there, and is neither a kingdom nor a republic.

Pope Sergius IV Pope from 1009 to 1012

Pope Sergius IV was Pope and the ruler of the Papal States from 31 July 1009 to his death in 1012.

Births

May 22 is the 142nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 223 days remain until the end of the year.

Su Xun Song dynasty person CBDB = 3762

Su Xun was a Song dynasty writer, best known for his essays. He is considered one of the Eight Masters of the Tang and Song, along with his sons Su Shi and Su Zhe.

1066 Year

1066 (MLXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

The 1000s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1000, and ended on December 31, 1009.

742 Year

Year 742 (DCCXLII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 742 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

Year 864 (DCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

967 Year

Year 967 (CMLXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

836 Year

Year 836 (DCCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

992 Year

Year 992 (CMXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

961 Year

Year 961 (CMLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1010s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1010, and ended on December 31, 1019.

976 Year

Year 976 (CMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

996 Year

Year 996 (CMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

981 Year

Year 981 (CMLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

978 Year

Year 978 (CMLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

932 Year

Year 932 (CMXXXII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

912 Year

Year 912 (CMXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. In the Annals of Quedlinburg, Saxony-Anhalt.
  2. Norwich, John Julius. The Normans in the South 1016–1130. Longmans; London, 1967.
  3. Norwich, John Julius (1982). A History of Venice. New York: Alfred A. Knopf.
  4. Peter Sawyer. The Oxford Illustrated History of the Vikings. London: Oxford University Press. p. 75. ISBN   978-0-19-285434-6.
  5. The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle
  6. Sutton, Ian (1999). Architecture, from Ancient Greece to the Present . London: Thames & Hudson. ISBN   978-0-500-20316-3.