937

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
937 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 937
CMXXXVII
Ab urbe condita 1690
Armenian calendar 386
ԹՎ ՅՁԶ
Assyrian calendar 5687
Balinese saka calendar 858–859
Bengali calendar 344
Berber calendar 1887
Buddhist calendar 1481
Burmese calendar 299
Byzantine calendar 6445–6446
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire  Monkey)
3633 or 3573
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
3634 or 3574
Coptic calendar 653–654
Discordian calendar 2103
Ethiopian calendar 929–930
Hebrew calendar 4697–4698
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 993–994
 - Shaka Samvat 858–859
 - Kali Yuga 4037–4038
Holocene calendar 10937
Iranian calendar 315–316
Islamic calendar 325–326
Japanese calendar Jōhei 7
(承平7年)
Javanese calendar 837–838
Julian calendar 937
CMXXXVII
Korean calendar 3270
Minguo calendar 975 before ROC
民前975年
Nanakshahi calendar −531
Seleucid era 1248/1249 AG
Thai solar calendar 1479–1480
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1063 or 682 or −90
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1064 or 683 or −89
Queen Bertha and the Spinners (1888). Reine Berthe et les fileueses, 1888.jpg
Queen Bertha and the Spinners (1888).

Year 937 ( CMXXXVII ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

Principality of Hungary

The Principality of Hungary or Duchy of Hungary was the earliest documented Hungarian state in the Carpathian Basin, established 895 or 896, following the 9th century Hungarian conquest of the Carpathian Basin.

Burgundy Region in France

Burgundy is a historical territory and a former administrative region of France. It takes its name from the Burgundians, an East Germanic people who moved westwards beyond the Rhine during the late Roman period.

Tournus Commune in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté, France

Tournus is a commune in the Saône-et-Loire department in the region of Bourgogne in eastern France.

England

The Battle of Brunanburh was fought in 937 between Æthelstan, King of England, and an alliance of Olaf Guthfrithson, King of Dublin; Constantine II, King of Alba and Owen, King of Strathclyde. One of the historiographical cruxes of this battle is the fact that it is often cited as the point of origin for English nationalism. Additionally, historians such as Michael Livingston argue that "the men who fought and died on that field forged a political map of the future that remains [in modernity], arguably making the Battle of Brunanburh one of the most significant battles in the long history not just of England, but of the whole of the British Isles."

Æthelstan King of the Anglo-Saxons, King of the English

Æthelstan or Athelstan was King of the Anglo-Saxons from 924 to 927 and King of the English from 927 to 939 when he died. He was the son of King Edward the Elder and his first wife, Ecgwynn. Modern historians regard him as the first King of England and one of the greatest Anglo-Saxon kings. He never married and had no children. He was succeeded by his half-brother, Edmund.

Olaf Guthfrithson was a Viking leader who ruled Dublin and Viking Northumbria in the 10th century. He was the son of Gofraid ua Ímair and great-grandson of Ímar, making him one of the Uí Ímair. Olaf succeeded his father as King of Dublin in 934 and succeeded in establishing dominance over the Vikings of Limerick when he captured their king, Amlaíb Cenncairech, in 937. That same year he allied with Constantine II of Scotland in an attempt to reclaim the Kingdom of Northumbria which his father had ruled briefly in 927. The forces of Olaf and Constantine were defeated by the English led by Æthelstan at the Battle of Brunanburh.

Asia

November 10 is the 314th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 51 days remaining until the end of the year.

Li Bian, known as Xu Gao between 937 and 939 and Xu Zhigao before 937, and possibly Li Pengnu during his childhood, also known posthumously by his temple name Liezu, was the founder and first emperor of the Southern Tang. In traditional histories, he is also often referred to as the First Lord of Southern Tang (南唐先主). He was an adopted son and successor of the Wu regent Xu Wen who usurped power from the Wu emperor Yang Pu.

Yang Pu (楊溥), formally Emperor Rui of Wu (吳睿帝), known as Emperor Gaoshang Sixuan Honggu Rang or, in short, Emperor Rang, while still living during the initial months of succeeding Southern Tang, was the last ruler of the Chinese Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period state Wu, and the only one that claimed the title of emperor. During his reign, the state was in effective control of the regents Xu Wen and Xu Wen's adoptive son and successor Xu Zhigao. In 938, Xu Zhigao forced Yang Pu to yield the throne to him, who then established Southern Tang.

Births

Attilanus (Atilanus) (937–1007) was a Spanish Benedictine and bishop of Zamora. He was prior of Moreruela Abbey.

Roman Catholic Diocese of Zamora in Spain diocese of the Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Zamora is a diocese in the city of Zamora in the Ecclesiastical province of Valladolid in Spain.

1007 Year

Year in topic Year 1007 (MVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 354 days remaining until the end of the year.

Empress Cao, formally Empress Hewuxian (和武憲皇后), was an empress of the Chinese Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms Period state Later Tang. Her husband was Later Tang's second emperor Li Siyuan, and she was empress dowager during the subsequent reigns of his son Li Conghou and adoptive son Li Congke. Eventually, when her son-in-law Shi Jingtang rebelled against Li Congke, establishing his own Later Jin and attacked the Later Tang capital Luoyang, she died in a mass suicide with Li Congke, his family, and some officers.

Later Tang Chinese dynasty

Tang, known in history as Later Tang, was a short-lived imperial dynasty that lasted from 923 to 937 during the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period in the history of China.

Related Research Articles

814 Year

Year 814 (DCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

840 Year

Year 840 (DCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

The 930s decade ran from January 1, 930, to December 31, 939.

826 Year

Year 826 (DCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

684 Year

Year 684 (DCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 684 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

886 Year

Year 886 (DCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

675 Year

Year 675 (DCLXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 675 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

881 Year

Year 881 (DCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

923 Year

Year 923 (CMXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

926 Year

Year 926 (CMXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1032 Year

Year 1032 (MXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

965 Year

Year 965 (CMLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

880 Year

Year 880 (DCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

905 Year

Year 905 (CMV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

906 Year

Year 906 (CMVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

912 Year

Year 912 (CMXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

890 Year

Year 890 (DCCCXC) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Timothy Reuter (1999). The New Cambrigde Medieval History, Volume III, pp. 341–342. ISBN   978-0-521-36447-8.
  2. Ernest F. Henderson (1894). History of Germany in the Middle Ages, G. Bell & Sons, London, p. 125.