890

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
890 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 890
DCCCXC
Ab urbe condita 1643
Armenian calendar 339
ԹՎ ՅԼԹ
Assyrian calendar 5640
Balinese saka calendar 811–812
Bengali calendar 297
Berber calendar 1840
Buddhist calendar 1434
Burmese calendar 252
Byzantine calendar 6398–6399
Chinese calendar 己酉(Earth  Rooster)
3586 or 3526
     to 
庚戌年 (Metal  Dog)
3587 or 3527
Coptic calendar 606–607
Discordian calendar 2056
Ethiopian calendar 882–883
Hebrew calendar 4650–4651
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 946–947
 - Shaka Samvat 811–812
 - Kali Yuga 3990–3991
Holocene calendar 10890
Iranian calendar 268–269
Islamic calendar 276–277
Japanese calendar Kanpyō 2
(寛平2年)
Javanese calendar 788–789
Julian calendar 890
DCCCXC
Korean calendar 3223
Minguo calendar 1022 before ROC
民前1022年
Nanakshahi calendar −578
Seleucid era 1201/1202 AG
Thai solar calendar 1432–1433
Tibetan calendar 阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
1016 or 635 or −137
     to 
阳金狗年
(male Iron-Dog)
1017 or 636 or −136
Svatopluk I of Moravia with his three sons. Svatopluk I.jpg
Svatopluk I of Moravia with his three sons.

Year 890 ( DCCCXC ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Europe

Nobility privileged social class

Nobility is a social class in aristocracy, normally ranked immediately under royalty, that possesses more acknowledged privileges and higher social status than most other classes in a society and with membership thereof typically being hereditary. The privileges associated with nobility may constitute substantial advantages over or relative to non-nobles, or may be largely honorary, and vary by country and era. The Medieval chivalric motto "noblesse oblige", meaning literally "nobility obligates", explains that privileges carry a lifelong obligation of duty to uphold various social responsibilities of, e.g., honorable behavior, customary service, or leadership roles or positions, that lives on by a familial or kinship bond.

Provence Historical province in Provence-Alpes-Côte dAzur, France

Provence is a geographical region and historical province of southeastern France, which extends from the left bank of the lower Rhône River to the west to the Italian border to the east, and is bordered by the Mediterranean Sea to the south. It largely corresponds with the modern administrative région of Provence-Alpes-Côte d'Azur, and includes the départements of Var, Bouches-du-Rhône, Alpes-de-Haute-Provence and parts of Alpes-Maritimes and Vaucluse. The largest city of the region is Marseille.

Anarchy refers to a society, entity, group of people, or a single person that rejects hierarchy. The word originally meant 'leaderlessness', but in 1840 Pierre-Joseph Proudhon adopted the term in his treatise What Is Property? to refer to a new political philosophy: anarchism, which advocates stateless societies based on voluntary associations.

Britain

Alfred the Great 9th-century King of Wessex

Alfred the Great was King of Wessex from 871 to c. 886 and King of the Anglo-Saxons from c. 886 to 899. He was the youngest son of King Æthelwulf of Wessex. His father died when he was young and three of Alfred's brothers reigned in turn. Alfred took the throne after the death of his brother Æthelred and spent several years dealing with Viking invasions. He won a decisive victory in the Battle of Edington in 878 and made an agreement with the Vikings, creating what was known as Danelaw in the North of England. Alfred also oversaw the conversion of Viking leader Guthrum to Christianity. He successfully defended his kingdom against the Viking attempt at conquest, and he became the dominant ruler in England. He was also the first King of the West Saxons to style himself King of the Anglo-Saxons. Details of his life are described in a work by 9th-century Welsh scholar and bishop Asser.

Old English, or Anglo-Saxon, is the earliest historical form of the English language, spoken in England and southern and eastern Scotland in the early Middle Ages. It was brought to Great Britain by Anglo-Saxon settlers probably in the mid-5th century, and the first Old English literary works date from the mid-7th century. After the Norman conquest of 1066, English was replaced, for a time, as the language of the upper classes by Anglo-Norman, a relative of French. This is regarded as marking the end of the Old English era, as during this period the English language was heavily influenced by Anglo-Norman, developing into a phase known now as Middle English.

Pope Gregory I Medieval pope from 590 to 604

Pope Gregory I, commonly known as Saint Gregory the Great, was Pope of the Catholic Church from 3 September 590 to 12 March 604 AD. He is famous for instigating the first recorded large-scale mission from Rome, the Gregorian Mission, to convert the then-pagan Anglo-Saxons in England to Christianity. Gregory is also well known for his writings, which were more prolific than those of any of his predecessors as Pope. The epithet Saint Gregory the Dialogist has been attached to him in Eastern Christianity because of his Dialogues. English translations of Eastern texts sometimes list him as Gregory "Dialogos", or the Anglo-Latinate equivalent "Dialogus".

Births

Arnulf I, Count of Flanders Count of Flanders

Arnulf of Flanders, called the Great, was the first Count of Flanders, who ruled the County of Flanders, an area that is now northern France (Nord), northwestern Belgium and southwestern Netherlands.

County of Flanders French fiefdom and historic territory in the Low Countries

The County of Flanders was a historic territory in the Low Countries.

Gilbert was son of Reginar, Duke of Lorraine, and possibly through his paternal grandmother was great-grandson of the Holy Roman Emperor Lothair I. He was duke of Lotharingia until 939.

Deaths

February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 322 days remaining until the end of the year.

Henjō Japanese writer

Sōjō Henjō was a Japanese waka poet and Buddhist priest. His birth name was Yoshimine no Munesada (良岑宗貞). Thanks to a reference to him in the preface of Kokin Wakashū he is listed as one of the Six best Waka poets and one of the Thirty-six Poetry Immortals.

<i>Waka</i> (poetry) type of poetry in classical Japanese literature.

Waka is a type of poetry in classical Japanese literature. Waka are composed in Japanese, and are contrasted with poetry composed by Japanese poets in Classical Chinese, which are known as kanshi. Although waka in modern Japanese is written as 和歌, in the past it was also written as 倭歌, and a variant name is yamato-uta (大和歌).

Related Research Articles

840 Year

Year 840 (DCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

834 Year

Year 834 (DCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

850 Year

For codepage, see CP850. Year 850 (DCCCL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

995 Year

Year 995 (CMXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

909 Year

Year 909 (CMIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

875 Year

Year 875 (DCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

876 Year

Year 876 (DCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

870 Year

Year 870 (DCCCLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

874 Year

Year 874 (DCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

877 Year

Year 877 (DCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

878 Year

Year 878 (DCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

879 Year

Year 879 (DCCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

880 Year

Year 880 (DCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

985 Year

Year 985 (CMLXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

960 Year

Year 960 (CMLX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

911 Year

Year 911 (CMXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

918 Year

Year 918 (CMXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

894 Year

Year 894 (DCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

888 Year

Year 888 (DCCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. St Oswald's Priory, English Heritage.