12th century

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Eastern Hemisphere at the beginning of the 12th century. East-Hem 1100ad.jpg
Eastern Hemisphere at the beginning of the 12th century.
The Ghurid Empire converted to Islam from Buddhism. Ghurids1200.png
The Ghurid Empire converted to Islam from Buddhism.
Saladin Ayyubi and Guy of Lusignan after Battle of Hattin. Saladin and Guy.jpg
Saladin Ayyubi and Guy of Lusignan after Battle of Hattin.
Averroes in a 14th-century painting by Andrea di Bonaiuto AverroesColor.jpg
Averroes in a 14th-century painting by Andrea di Bonaiuto
A Black and White Photo of the 12th century Cuenca Cathedral (built from 1182 to 1270) in Cuenca, Spain A Black and White Photo of the Cuenca Cathedral in Spain.jpeg
A Black and White Photo of the 12th century Cuenca Cathedral (built from 1182 to 1270) in Cuenca, Spain

The 12th century is the period from 1101 to 1200 in accordance with the Julian calendar. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages and is sometimes called the Age of the Cistercians . The Golden Age of Islam kept experiencing significant developments, particularly in Islamic Spain, Seljuk and Ghurid territories. Most of the Crusader states including the Kingdom of Jerusalem fell to the Ayyubid dynasty founded by Saladin, who overtook the Fatimids. In Song dynasty of China faced an invasion by Jurchens, which caused a political schism of north and south. The Khmer Empire of Cambodia flourished during this century. Following the expansions of the Ghaznavids and Ghurid Empire, the Muslim conquests in the Indian subcontinent till Bengal began to place in the end of the century.

Contents

Ongoing events

The temple complex of Angkor Wat, built during the reign of Suryavarman II in Cambodia of the Khmer Era. Angkor wat temple.jpg
The temple complex of Angkor Wat, built during the reign of Suryavarman II in Cambodia of the Khmer Era.

Inventions, discoveries and introductions by year

The Liuhe Pagoda of Hangzhou, China, 1165 Liuhe Pagoda.jpg
The Liuhe Pagoda of Hangzhou, China, 1165

Political events by year

Richard I of England, or Richard the Lionheart. Richard coeurdelion g.jpg
Richard I of England, or Richard the Lionheart.
Eastern Hemisphere at the end of the 12th century East-Hem 1200ad.jpg
Eastern Hemisphere at the end of the 12th century

Significant people

A 15th-century depiction of Saladin SaladinRexAegypti.jpg
A 15th-century depiction of Saladin
Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard von Bingen receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary Hildegard von Bingen.jpg
Illumination from the Liber Scivias showing Hildegard von Bingen receiving a vision and dictating to her scribe and secretary

Related Research Articles

11th century Century

The 11th century is the period from 1001 to 1100 in accordance with the Julian calendar, and the 1st century of the 2nd millennium.

The 1160s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1160, and ended on December 31, 1169.

The 1070s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1070, and ended on December 31, 1079.

The 1170s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1170, and ended on December 31, 1179.

The 1100s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1100, and ended on December 31, 1109.

The 1120s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1120, and ended on December 31, 1129.

The 1130s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1130, and ended on December 31, 1139.

The 1180s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1180, and ended on December 31, 1189.

The 1190s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1190, and ended on December 31, 1199.

The 1110s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1110, and ended on December 31, 1119.

Year 1118 (MCXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1125 Calendar year

Year 1125 (MCXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1260s is the decade starting January 1, 1260 and ending December 31, 1269.

1137 Calendar year

Year 1137 (MCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1105 Calendar year

Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Third Crusade attempt by European leaders to reconquer the Holy Land from Saladin

The Third Crusade (1189–1192) was an attempt by the leaders of the three most powerful states of Western Christianity to reconquer the Holy Land following the capture of Jerusalem by the Ayyubid sultan Saladin in 1187. It was partially successful, recapturing the important cities of Acre and Jaffa, and reversing most of Saladin's conquests, but it failed to recapture Jerusalem, which was the major aim of the Crusade and its religious focus.

Conrad IV of Germany 13th century King of Germany

Conrad, a member of the Hohenstaufen dynasty, was the only son of Emperor Frederick II from his second marriage with Queen Isabella II of Jerusalem. He inherited the title of King of Jerusalem upon the death of his mother in childbed. Appointed Duke of Swabia in 1235, his father had him elected King of Germany and crowned King of Italy in 1237. After the emperor was deposed and died in 1250, he ruled as King of Sicily until his death.

The 1020s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1020, and ended on December 31, 1029.

1400s (decade) decade

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Warren 1961, p. 129.
  2. Warren 1961, p. 159.
  3. Warren 1961, p. 60-61.
  4. Le Goff, Jacques (1986). The Birth of Purgatory . Chicago: University of Chicago Press. ISBN   0226470822.
  5. Soekmono, R, Drs., Pengantar Sejarah Kebudayaan Indonesia 2, 2nd ed. Penerbit Kanisius, Yogyakarta, 1973, 5th reprint edition in 1988 p.57
  6. Enn Tarvel (2007). Sigtuna hukkumine. Haridus, 2007 (7-8), p 38–41
  7. Notice sur les Arabes hilaliens. Ismaël Hamet. p. 248.

Bibliography