1182

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1182 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1182
MCLXXXII
Ab urbe condita 1935
Armenian calendar 631
ԹՎ ՈԼԱ
Assyrian calendar 5932
Balinese saka calendar 1103–1104
Bengali calendar 589
Berber calendar 2132
English Regnal year 28  Hen. 2   29  Hen. 2
Buddhist calendar 1726
Burmese calendar 544
Byzantine calendar 6690–6691
Chinese calendar 辛丑(Metal  Ox)
3878 or 3818
     to 
壬寅年 (Water  Tiger)
3879 or 3819
Coptic calendar 898–899
Discordian calendar 2348
Ethiopian calendar 1174–1175
Hebrew calendar 4942–4943
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1238–1239
 - Shaka Samvat 1103–1104
 - Kali Yuga 4282–4283
Holocene calendar 11182
Igbo calendar 182–183
Iranian calendar 560–561
Islamic calendar 577–578
Japanese calendar Yōwa 2 / Juei 1
(寿永元年)
Javanese calendar 1089–1090
Julian calendar 1182
MCLXXXII
Korean calendar 3515
Minguo calendar 730 before ROC
民前730年
Nanakshahi calendar −286
Seleucid era 1493/1494 AG
Thai solar calendar 1724–1725
Tibetan calendar 阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1308 or 927 or 155
     to 
阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1309 or 928 or 156

Year 1182 ( MCLXXXII ) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. The most recent year of such kind was 2010 and the next one will be 2021 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 2100, will also be a common year starting on Friday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in August. Leap years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another one in February.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Asia

Red Sea Arm of the Indian Ocean between Arabia and Africa

The Red Sea is a seawater inlet of the Indian Ocean, lying between Africa and Asia. The connection to the ocean is in the south through the Bab el Mandeb strait and the Gulf of Aden. To the north lie the Sinai Peninsula, the Gulf of Aqaba, and the Gulf of Suez. The Red Sea is a Global 200 ecoregion. The sea is underlain by the Red Sea Rift which is part of the Great Rift Valley.

Mecca Saudi Arabian city and capital of the Makkah province

Mecca is a city in the Hejazi region of the Arabian Peninsula, and the plain of Tihamah in Saudi Arabia, and is also the capital and administrative headquarters of the Makkah Region. The city is located 70 km (43 mi) inland from Jeddah in a narrow valley at a height of 277 m (909 ft) above sea level, and 340 kilometres (210 mi) south of Medina. Its resident population in 2012 was roughly 2 million, although visitors more than triple this number every year during the Ḥajj period held in the twelfth Muslim lunar month of Dhūl-Ḥijjah.

Japan Constitutional monarchy in East Asia

Japan is an island country in East Asia. Located in the Pacific Ocean, it lies off the eastern coast of the Asian continent and stretches from the Sea of Okhotsk in the north to the East China Sea and the Philippine Sea in the south.

Europe

Canute VI of Denmark King of Denmark 1182–1202

Canute VI was King of Denmark (1182–1202). Contemporary sources describe Canute as an earnest, strongly religious man.

Denmark constitutional monarchy in Europe

Denmark, officially the Kingdom of Denmark, is a Nordic country and the southernmost of the Scandinavian nations. Denmark lies southwest of Sweden and south of Norway, and is bordered to the south by Germany. The Kingdom of Denmark also comprises two autonomous constituent countries in the North Atlantic Ocean: the Faroe Islands and Greenland. Denmark proper consists of a peninsula, Jutland, and an archipelago of 443 named islands, with the largest being Zealand, Funen and the North Jutlandic Island. The islands are characterised by flat, arable land and sandy coasts, low elevation and a temperate climate. Denmark has a total area of 42,924 km2 (16,573 sq mi), land area of 42,394 km2 (16,368 sq mi), and the total area including Greenland and the Faroe Islands is 2,210,579 km2 (853,509 sq mi), and a population of 5.8 million.

Grand Principality of Serbia Medieval grand principality in Eastern Europe

Serbia, also known as Raška was a Serb medieval state that comprised parts of what is today Serbia, Montenegro, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and southern Dalmatia, being centred in the region of Raška. The state was formed in ca. 1091 out of a vassal principality of Duklja, a Serb state which had itself emerged from the early medieval Serbian Principality that was centred in Raška until 960, when it was left in obscurity in sources after the Byzantine–Bulgarian wars. Its founder, Vukan, took the title of Grand Prince when his uncle and overlord Constantine Bodin ended up in Byzantine prison after decades of revolt. While Duklja was struck with civil wars, Raška continued the fight against the Byzantines. It was ruled by the Vukanović dynasty, who managed to put most of the former Serbian state under their rule, as well as expanding to the south and east. Through diplomatic ties with Hungary it managed to retain its independence past the mid-12th century. After a dynastic civil war in 1166, Stefan Nemanja emerged victorious. Nemanja's son Stefan was crowned king in 1217, while his younger son Rastko was ordinated the first Archbishop of Serbs in 1219.

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Religion

Births

September 11 is the 254th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 111 days remaining until the end of the year.

Minamoto no Yoriie 2nd shogun of Kamakura shogunate

Minamoto no Yoriie was the second shōgun (1202–1203) of Japan's Kamakura shogunate, and the first son of first shōgun Yoritomo. His buddhist name was Hokke-in-dono Kingo Da'i Zengo (法華院殿金吾大禅閤).

Year 1204 (MCCIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

May 12 is the 132nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 233 days remaining until the end of the year.

Valdemar I of Denmark King of Denmark

Valdemar I of Denmark, also known as Valdemar the Great, was King of Denmark from 1146 until his death in 1182. The reign of King Valdemar I saw the rise of Denmark, which reached its zenith under his second son, and successor, King Valdemar II of Denmark.

Year 1131 (MCXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

Year 1282 (MCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1252 (MCCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

The 1180s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1180, and ended on December 31, 1189.

Year 1225 (MCCXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1227 (MCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1060 Year

Year 1060 (MLX) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1205 (MCCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1210s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1210, and ended on December 31, 1219.

The 1220s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1220, and ended on December 31, 1229.

Year 1170 (MCLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1363 (MCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1211 Year

Year 1211 (MCCXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1206 (MCCVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1162 (MCLXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1197 (MCXCVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1183 (MCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1185 (MCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1256 (MCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.
  2. Abels, Richard Philip; Bernard S. Bachrach (2001). The Normans and their adversaries at war. Woodbridge: Boydell & Brewer. p. 100. ISBN   0-85115-847-1.