1142

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1142 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1142
MCXLII
Ab urbe condita 1895
Armenian calendar 591
ԹՎ ՇՂԱ
Assyrian calendar 5892
Balinese saka calendar 1063–1064
Bengali calendar 549
Berber calendar 2092
English Regnal year 7  Ste. 1   8  Ste. 1
Buddhist calendar 1686
Burmese calendar 504
Byzantine calendar 6650–6651
Chinese calendar 辛酉(Metal  Rooster)
3838 or 3778
     to 
壬戌年 (Water  Dog)
3839 or 3779
Coptic calendar 858–859
Discordian calendar 2308
Ethiopian calendar 1134–1135
Hebrew calendar 4902–4903
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1198–1199
 - Shaka Samvat 1063–1064
 - Kali Yuga 4242–4243
Holocene calendar 11142
Igbo calendar 142–143
Iranian calendar 520–521
Islamic calendar 536–537
Japanese calendar Eiji 2 / Kōji 1
(康治元年)
Javanese calendar 1048–1049
Julian calendar 1142
MCXLII
Korean calendar 3475
Minguo calendar 770 before ROC
民前770年
Nanakshahi calendar −326
Seleucid era 1453/1454 AG
Thai solar calendar 1684–1685
Tibetan calendar 阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1268 or 887 or 115
     to 
阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1269 or 888 or 116

Year 1142 ( MCXLII ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By area

Africa

  • Unable to feed his population during a famine, the emir of the great commercial center of Mahdia has to recognize the de facto protectorate of Roger II of Sicily. [1]
  • A Norman raid against the city of Tripoli fails. [2]
Mahdia Place in Mahdia Governorate, Tunisia

Mahdia is a Tunisian coastal city with 62,189 inhabitants, south of Monastir and southeast of Sousse.

Roger II of Sicily King of Sicily

Roger II was King of Sicily, son of Roger I of Sicily and successor to his brother Simon. He began his rule as Count of Sicily in 1105, became Duke of Apulia and Calabria in 1127, and then King of Sicily in 1130. By the time of his death at the age of 58, Roger had succeeded in uniting all the Norman conquests in Italy into one kingdom with a strong centralized government.

Asia

October 11 is the 284th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 81 days remaining until the end of the year.

Treaty of Shaoxing peace treaty

The Treaty of Shaoxing was the agreement that ended the military conflicts between the Jin dynasty and the Southern Song dynasty. It also legally drew up the boundaries of the two countries and forced the Song dynasty to renounce all claims to its former territories north of the Qinling Huaihe Line, which included its former capital Kaifeng. Emperor Gaozong of Song executed Yue Fei after the treaty.

Jin dynasty (1115–1234) Chinese dynasty (1115–1234)

The Jin dynasty, officially known as the Great Jin, lasted from 1115 to 1234 as one of the last dynasties in Chinese history to predate the Mongol invasion of China. Its name is sometimes written as Kin, Jurchen Jin or Jinn in English to differentiate it from an earlier Jìn dynasty of China whose name is identical when transcribed without tone marker diacritics in the Hanyu Pinyin system for Standard Chinese. It is also sometimes called the "Jurchen dynasty" or the "Jurchen Jin", because its founding leader Aguda was of Wanyan Jurchen descent.

Europe

Births

Year 1220 (MCCXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Elisabeth, Countess of Vermandois French noblewoman

Not to be confused with Elizabeth of Vermandois, Countess of Leicester

Year 1183 (MCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

January 27 is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 338 days remaining until the end of the year.

Yue Fei 12th-century Song dynasty Chinese general

Yue Fei, courtesy name Pengju, was a Han Chinese military general who lived during the Southern Song dynasty. His ancestral home was in Xiaoti, Yonghe Village, Tangyin, Xiangzhou, Henan. He is best known for leading Southern Song forces in the wars in the 12th century between Southern Song and the Jurchen-ruled Jin dynasty in northern China before being put to death by the Southern Song government in 1142. He was granted the posthumous name Wumu (武穆) by Emperor Xiaozong in 1169, and later granted the posthumous title King of È (鄂王) by Emperor Ningzong in 1211. Widely seen as a patriot and national folk hero in China, since his death Yue Fei has evolved into a standard epitome of loyalty in Chinese culture.

Year 1103 (MCIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

12th century Century

The 12th century is the period from 1101 to 1200 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages and is sometimes called the Age of the Cistercians. In Song dynasty China an invasion by Jurchens caused a political schism of north and south. The Khmer Empire of Cambodia flourished during this century, while the Fatimids of Egypt were overtaken by the Ayyubid dynasty.

Year 1079 (MLXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1120s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1120, and ended on December 31, 1129.

The 1130s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1130, and ended on December 31, 1139.

The 1110s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1110, and ended on December 31, 1119.

1234 Year

Year 1234 (MCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

995 Year

Year 995 (CMXCV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1115 (MCXV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1119 (MCXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1125 (MCXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1127 Year

Year 1127 (MCXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1101 (MCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. It was the 2nd year of the 1100s decade, and the 1st year of the 12th century.

Year 1369 (MCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1411 (MCDXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1136 (MCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1137 (MCXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1075 (MLXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1085 (MLXXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1261 Year

Year 1261 (MCCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Abulafia, David (1985). The Norman kingdom of Africa and the Norman expeditions to Majorca and the Muslim Mediterranean. Woodbridge: Boydell Press. ISBN   0-85115-416-6.
  2. Bresc, Henri (2003). "La Sicile et l'espace libyen au Moyen Age" (PDF). Retrieved 17 January 2012.
  3. King, Peter (2015). "Peter Abelard". The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Metaphysics Research Lab, Stanford University. Retrieved 28 July 2018.
  4. "Orderic Vitalis | Norman history". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 28 July 2018.