January 4

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January 4 is the fourth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar.There are 361 days remaining until the end of the year(362 in leap years).

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

Contents

Events

Year 46 BC was the last year of the pre-Julian Roman calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Caesar and Lepidus. The denomination 46 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years. This year marks the change from the pre-Julian Roman calendar to the Julian calendar. The Romans had to periodically add a leap month every few years to keep the calendar year in sync with the solar year but had missed a few with the chaos of the civil wars of the late republic. Julius Caesar added two extra leap months to recalibrate the calendar in preparation for his calendar reform, which went into effect in 45 BC. This year therefore had 445 days, and was nicknamed annus confusionis.

Julius Caesar 1st-century BC Roman politician and general

Gaius Julius Caesar, known by his nomen and cognomen Julius Caesar, was a Roman politician, military general, and historian who played a critical role in the events that led to the demise of the Roman Republic and the rise of the Roman Empire. He also wrote Latin prose.

Titus Labienus was a professional Roman soldier in the late Roman Republic. He served as Tribune of the Plebs in 63 BC. Although remembered as one of Julius Caesar's lieutenants in Gaul, mentioned frequently in the accounts of his military campaigns, Labienus chose to oppose him during the Civil War and was killed at Munda. He was the father of Quintus Labienus.

Births

1077 Year

Year 1077 (MLXXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Emperor Zhezong 11th-century Chinese emperor

Emperor Zhezong of Song, personal name Zhao Xu, was the seventh emperor of the Song dynasty in China. His original personal name was Zhao Yong but he changed it to "Zhao Xu" after his coronation. He reigned from 1085 until his death in 1100, and was succeeded by his younger half-brother, Emperor Huizong, because his son died prematurely.

Year 1334 (MCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

871 Year

Year 871 (DCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Æthelwulf of Berkshire was a Saxon ealdorman. In 860 he and other men of Berkshire fought off a band of pirates near Winchester, Hampshire. Later he mustered a force of 1400 men against an army of Danes, won the 31 December 870 Battle of Englefield on behalf of the then kingdom of Wessex. He received a land grant in 843/44 from Brihtwulf, king of Mercia; and lost his life at the Battle of Reading.

Ealdorman

Ealdorman was a term in Anglo-Saxon England which originally applied to a man of high status, including some of royal birth, whose authority was independent of the king. It evolved in meaning and in the eighth century was sometimes applied to the former kings of territories which had submitted to great powers such as Mercia. In Wessex in the second half of the ninth century it meant the leaders of individual shires appointed by the king. By the tenth century ealdormen had become the local representatives of the West Saxon king of England. Ealdormen would lead in battle, preside over courts and levy taxation. Ealdormanries were the most prestigious royal appointments, the possession of noble families and semi-independent rulers. The territories became large, often covering former kingdoms such as Mercia or East Anglia. Southern ealdormen often attended court, reflecting increasing centralisation of the kingdom, but the loyalty of northern ealdormen was more uncertain. In the eleventh century the term eorl replaced that of ealdorman, but this reflected a change in terminology under Danish influence rather than a change in function.

Holidays and observances

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Angela of Foligno Italian saint

Angela of Foligno, T.O.S.F., was an Italian Franciscan tertiary who became known as a mystic from her extensive writings about her mystical revelations. Due to the respect those writings engendered in the Catholic Church she became known as "Mistress of Theologians".

Elizabeth Ann Seton 18th and 19th-century American Catholic religious founder and saint

Elizabeth Ann Bayley Seton, SC, was the first native-born citizen of the United States to be canonized by the Roman Catholic Church. She established the first Catholic girls' school in the nation in Emmitsburg, Maryland, where she also founded the first American congregation of religious sisters, the Sisters of Charity.

Events

Related Research Articles

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 269 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 262 days remaining until the end of the year.

December 5 is the 339th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 26 days remaining until the end of the year.

December 9 is the 343rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 22 days remaining until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 193 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 11 is the 11th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 354 days remaining until the end of the year.

January 9 is the ninth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 356 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 1 is the 305th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 60 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 39 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 56 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 7 is the 311th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 54 days remaining until the end of the year.

November 15 is the 319th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 46 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 82 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 87 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 9 is the 282nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 83 days remaining until the end of the year.

October 16 is the 289th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 76 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 6 is the 249th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 116 days remaining until the end of the year.

September 25 is the 268th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 97 days remaining until the end of the year.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 271 days remaining until the end of the year.

References

  1. Evelyn Shirley Shuckburgh (1902). A History of Rome to the Battle of Actium. Macmillan.
  2. Mark Grossman (2007). World Military Leaders: A Biographical Dictionary. Infobase Publishing. p. 13. ISBN   978-0-8160-7477-8.
  3. New Encyclop3Œdia Britannica: Macrop3Œdia. Encyclop3Œdia Britannica. 1997. p. 501.
  4. Political Handbook of the World. Center for Comparative Political Research of the State University of New York at Binghamton and for the Council on Foreign Relations. 1963. p. 89.
  5. Anil K. Maini; Varsha Agrawal (29 January 2007). Satellite Technology: Principles and Applications. John Wiley & Sons. p. 8. ISBN   978-0-470-03335-7.
  6. Michael Gray (4 January 2011). "Gerry Rafferty obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  7. Roger Nichols (5 January 2017). "Georges Prêtre obituary". The Guardian. Retrieved 28 February 2019.
  8. McFadden, Robert D. (January 5, 2019). "Harold Brown, Defense Secretary in Carter Administration, Dies at 91".