1863

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1863 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1863
MDCCCLXIII
Ab urbe condita 2616
Armenian calendar 1312
ԹՎ ՌՅԺԲ
Assyrian calendar 6613
Bahá'í calendar 19–20
Balinese saka calendar 1784–1785
Bengali calendar 1270
Berber calendar 2813
British Regnal year 26  Vict. 1   27  Vict. 1
Buddhist calendar 2407
Burmese calendar 1225
Byzantine calendar 7371–7372
Chinese calendar 壬戌(Water  Dog)
4559 or 4499
     to 
癸亥年 (Water  Pig)
4560 or 4500
Coptic calendar 1579–1580
Discordian calendar 3029
Ethiopian calendar 1855–1856
Hebrew calendar 5623–5624
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1919–1920
 - Shaka Samvat 1784–1785
 - Kali Yuga 4963–4964
Holocene calendar 11863
Igbo calendar 863–864
Iranian calendar 1241–1242
Islamic calendar 1279–1280
Japanese calendar Bunkyū 3
(文久3年)
Javanese calendar 1791–1792
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 12 days
Korean calendar 4196
Minguo calendar 49 before ROC
民前49年
Nanakshahi calendar 395
Thai solar calendar 2405–2406
Tibetan calendar 阳水狗年
(male Water-Dog)
1989 or 1608 or 836
     to 
阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1990 or 1609 or 837

1863 ( MDCCCLXIII ) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar  and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar , the 1863rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 863rd year of the 2nd millennium , the 63rd year of the 19th century , and the 4th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1863, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year is a calendar year with 365 days, as distinguished from a leap year, which has 366. More generally, a common year is one without intercalation. The Gregorian calendar,, employs both common years and leap years to keep the calendar aligned with the tropical year, which does not contain an exact number of days.

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

Contents

Events

January 8: First Transcontinental Railroad Transcontinental railroad route.png
January 8: First Transcontinental Railroad

January–March

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Abraham Lincoln 16th president of the United States

Abraham Lincoln was an American statesman, politician, and lawyer who served as the 16th president of the United States from 1861 until his assassination in April 1865. Lincoln led the nation through the American Civil War, its bloodiest war and its greatest moral, constitutional, and political crisis. He preserved the Union, abolished slavery, strengthened the federal government, and modernized the U.S. economy.

Emancipation Proclamation executive order issued by President Abraham Lincoln in 1863 that freed Southern slaves

The Emancipation Proclamation, or Proclamation 95, was a presidential proclamation and executive order issued by United States President Abraham Lincoln on January 1, 1863. It changed the federal legal status of more than 3.5 million enslaved African Americans in the designated areas of the South from slave to free. As soon as a slave escaped the control of the Confederate government, by running away or through advances of federal troops, the former slave became free. Ultimately, the rebel surrender liberated and resulted in the proclamation's application to all of the designated former slaves. It did not cover slaves in Union areas that were freed by state action. It was issued as a war measure during the American Civil War, directed to all of the areas in rebellion and all segments of the executive branch of the United States.

February 7: HMS Orpheus sinks. HMS Orpheus.jpg
February 7: HMS Orpheus sinks.

February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 333 days remaining until the end of the year.

January Uprising Polish uprising against occupying Russian Empire in the 19th century

The January Uprising was an insurrection instigated principally in the Russian Partition of the former Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth against its occupation by the Russian Empire. It began on January 22, 1863 spread to the other Partitions of Poland and continued until the last insurgents were captured in 1864.

February 2 is the 33rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 332 days remaining until the end of the year.

AprilJune

May 17: Manet's Le dejeuner sur l'herbe exhibited. Edouard Manet - Luncheon on the Grass - Google Art Project.jpg
May 17: Manet's Le déjeuner sur l'herbe exhibited.

JulySeptember

July: Battle of Gettysburg. Battle of Gettysburg.jpg
July: Battle of Gettysburg.

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

JanuaryJune

Helen Dortch Longstreet Helen Dortch Longstreet.jpg
Helen Dortch Longstreet

JulyDecember

Hugo Winckler Winckler, Hugo.jpg
Hugo Winckler
Amelie Rives Troubetzkoy Amelie Rives 001.jpg
Amélie Rives Troubetzkoy
Henry Ford Henry ford 1919.jpg
Henry Ford
Edvard Munch Edvard Munch 1921.jpg
Edvard Munch

Date Unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Antonio Valero de Bernabe Antonio Valero Bernabe.gif
Antonio Valero de Bernabé

JulyDecember

Eugene Delacroix Felix Nadar 1820-1910 portraits Eugene Delacroix restored.jpg
Eugène Delacroix
Jacob Grimm JacobGrimm.jpg
Jacob Grimm

In fiction

Related Research Articles

1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1861st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 861st year of the 2nd millennium, the 61st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1861, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1862 (MDCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1862nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 862nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 62nd year of the 19th century, and the 3rd year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1862, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. This year was named by Mitchell Stephens as the greatest year to read newspapers.

The 50th Georgia Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment raised by the state of Georgia to fight for the Confederacy in the American Civil War.

Robert E. Rodes Confederate Army general

Robert Emmett Rodes was a Confederate general in the American Civil War, and the first of Robert E. Lee's divisional commanders not trained at West Point. His division led Stonewall Jackson's devastating surprise attack at the Battle of Chancellorsville; Jackson, on his deathbed, promoted Rodes to major general. Rodes then served in the corps of Richard S. Ewell at the Battle of Gettysburg and in the Overland Campaign, before that corps was sent to the Shenandoah Valley under Jubal Early, where Rodes was killed at the Third Battle of Winchester.

William E. Jones Confederate Army general

William Edmondson "Grumble" Jones was a planter, a career United States Army officer, and a Confederate cavalry general, killed in the Battle of Piedmont in the American Civil War.

XVII Corps (Union Army)

XVII Corps was a corps of the Union Army during the American Civil War. It was organized December 18, 1862 as part of Ulysses S. Grant's Army of the Tennessee. It was most notably commanded by Maj. Gen. James B. McPherson and Maj. Gen. Francis P. Blair II, and served in the Western Theater.

Trans-Mississippi Theater of the American Civil War

The Trans-Mississippi Theater of the American Civil War consists of the major military operations west of the Mississippi River. The area is often thought of as excluding the states and territories bordering the Pacific Ocean, which formed the Pacific Coast Theater of the American Civil War (1861-1865).

The Mississippi River campaigns, within the Trans-Mississippi Theater of the American Civil War, were a series of military actions by the Union Army during which Union troops, helped by Union Navy gunboats and river ironclads, took control of the Cumberland River, the Tennessee River and the Mississippi River, main north-south avenues of transport. In July 1863, the Trans-Mississippi Department of the Confederate States of America was split from the Confederate States east of the river when the Union gained control of the entire Mississippi River. The Union then controlled a main artery of transportation for the South, depriving the rest of the Confederacy of men, food and other supplies from the Confederate States west of the river. While not commonly lumped together under this designation, the river campaigns were undertaken mainly for reasons found in Union General-in-Chief Winfield Scott's 1861 Anaconda Plan. Scott proposed to defeat the Confederacy largely through blockade of ports and control of rivers leading to the economic 'strangulation' of the Confederacy, which he hoped would prevent a large number of bloody land battles.

David Gregg McIntosh Confederate Army officer

David Gregg McIntosh was a Confederate artillery officer during the American Civil War from the state of South Carolina.

Samuel Gibbs French Confederate Army general

Samuel Gibbs French was an officer in the U.S. Army, wealthy planter, author, and a major general in the Confederate army during the American Civil War. He commanded a division in the Army of Tennessee in the Western Theater.

22nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry

The 22nd Regiment Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry was an infantry regiment in the Union army during the American Civil War. The 22nd Massachusetts was organized by Senator Henry Wilson and was therefore known as "Henry Wilson's Regiment." It was formed in Boston, Massachusetts, and established on September 28, 1861, for a term of three years.

USS Alpha (1864) was a side wheel paddle steamer acquired by the Union Navy during the American Civil War.

1861 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1861

Events from the year 1861 in the United States. This year marked the beginning of the American Civil War.

1862 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1862

Events from the year 1862 in the United States.

1863 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1863

Events from the year 1863 in the United States.

1864 in the United States USA-related events during the year of 1864

Events from the year 1864 in the United States.

Ulysses S. Grant and the American Civil War Wikimedia history article

Ulysses S. Grant was the most acclaimed Union general during the American Civil War and was twice elected President. Grant began his military career as a cadet at the United States Military Academy at West Point in 1839. After graduation he went on to serve with distinction as a lieutenant in the Mexican–American War. Grant was a keen observer of the war and learned battle strategies serving under Generals Zachary Taylor and Winfield Scott. After the war Grant served at various posts especially in the Pacific Northwest; he was forced to retire from the service in 1854 due to accusations of drunkenness. He was unable to make a success of farming and on the onset of the Civil War in April 1861, Grant was working as a clerk in his father's leather goods store in Galena, Illinois. When the war began his military experience was needed, and Congressman Elihu B. Washburne became his patron in political affairs and promotions in Illinois and nationwide.

1865 (MDCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1865th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 865th year of the 2nd millennium, the 65th year of the 19th century, and the 6th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1865, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1864th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 864th year of the 2nd millennium, the 64th year of the 19th century, and the 5th year of the 1860s decade. As of the start of 1864, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

References

  1. Foner, Eric (2010). The Fiery Trial: Abraham Lincoln and American Slavery. New York: Norton. pp. 239–42. ISBN   978-0-393-06618-0.
  2. 1 2 Resoconto del Comitato cantonale di Soccorso intorno ai sussidi raccolti e distribuiti pei danni cagionati dalle nevi nel gennaio 1863. Lugano: Tip. Cantonale. 1864.
  3. 1 2 3 4 Everett, Jason M., ed. (2006). "1863". The People's Chronology. Thomson Gale.
  4. Boissier, Pierre (1985). History of the International Committee of the Red Cross. Volume I: From Solferino to Tsushima. Geneva: Henry Dunant Institute. ISBN   2-88044-012-2.
  5. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  6. Smith, Peter (2000). "Ridvan". A concise encyclopedia of the Bahá'í Faith. Oxford: Oneworld Publications. pp. 296–297. ISBN   1-85168-184-1.
  7. 1 2 Chaffin, Tom (2008). The H. L. Hunley: the Secret Hope of the Confederacy. New York: Hill and Wang. ISBN   978-0-8090-9512-4.
  8. Letters Patent annexing the Northern Territory to South Australia, 1863 Archived June 1, 2011, at the Wayback Machine . National Archives of Australia.
  9. Nolan, Daniel J. (2011). Clippers: the ships that shaped the world. Bray: Malbay Publishing. p. 97. ISBN   978-1-908726-00-1.
  10. CommunicationSolutions/ISI, "Railroad — Western Railroad Company", North Carolina Business History, 2006, accessed 1 Feb 2010
  11. Ransom, P. J. G. (1996). Narrow Gauge Steam: its origins and world-wide development. Sparkford: Oxford Publishing Co. ISBN   0-86093-533-7.
  12. Marshall, John (1989). The Guinness Railway Book. Enfield: Guinness Books. ISBN   0-8511-2359-7. OCLC   24175552.
  13. Bragg, Melvyn (2006). 12 books that changed the world. London: Hodder & Stoughton. ISBN   0-340-83980-5.