1908

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
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1908 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1908
MCMVIII
Ab urbe condita 2661
Armenian calendar 1357
ԹՎ ՌՅԾԷ
Assyrian calendar 6658
Bahá'í calendar 64–65
Balinese saka calendar 1829–1830
Bengali calendar 1315
Berber calendar 2858
British Regnal year 7  Edw. 7   8  Edw. 7
Buddhist calendar 2452
Burmese calendar 1270
Byzantine calendar 7416–7417
Chinese calendar 丁未(Fire  Goat)
4604 or 4544
     to 
戊申年 (Earth  Monkey)
4605 or 4545
Coptic calendar 1624–1625
Discordian calendar 3074
Ethiopian calendar 1900–1901
Hebrew calendar 5668–5669
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1964–1965
 - Shaka Samvat 1829–1830
 - Kali Yuga 5008–5009
Holocene calendar 11908
Igbo calendar 908–909
Iranian calendar 1286–1287
Islamic calendar 1325–1326
Japanese calendar Meiji 41
(明治41年)
Javanese calendar 1837–1838
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 13 days
Korean calendar 4241
Minguo calendar 4 before ROC
民前4年
Nanakshahi calendar 440
Thai solar calendar 2450–2451
Tibetan calendar 阴火羊年
(female Fire-Goat)
2034 or 1653 or 881
     to 
阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
2035 or 1654 or 882

1908 ( MCMVIII ) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar , the 1908th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 908th year of the 2nd millennium , the 8th year of the 20th century , and the 9th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1908, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

A leap year starting on Wednesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are ED, such as the years 1908, 1936, 1964, 1992, 2020, 2048, 2076, and 2116 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2004 and 2032 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in March and November. Common years starting on Thursday share this characteristic, but also have another in February.

Contents

According to NASA reports, 1908 was the coldest recorded year since 1880. [1]

NASA space-related agency of the United States government

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is an independent agency of the United States Federal Government responsible for the civilian space program, as well as aeronautics and aerospace research.

1880 (MDCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1880th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 880th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 19th century, and the 1st year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1880, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1908 Baby New Year on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post. Babynew.jpg
1908 Baby New Year on the cover of The Saturday Evening Post .

Events

January

January 24: Boy Scout movement. WikiProject Scouting fleur-de-lis dark.svg
January 24: Boy Scout movement.

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

<i>Nimrod</i> Expedition first of three expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton

The NimrodExpedition of 1907–09, otherwise known as the British Antarctic Expedition, was the first of three expeditions to the Antarctic led by Ernest Shackleton. Its main target, among a range of geographical and scientific objectives, was to be first to the South Pole. This was not attained, but the expedition's southern march reached a Farthest South latitude of 88° 23' S, just 97.5 nautical miles from the pole. This was by far the longest southern polar journey to that date and a record convergence on either Pole. A separate group led by Welsh Australian geology professor Edgeworth David reached the estimated location of the South Magnetic Pole, and the expedition also achieved the first ascent of Mount Erebus, Antarctica's second highest volcano.

Ernest Shackleton Anglo-Irish polar explorer

Sir Ernest Henry Shackleton was a British polar explorer who led three British expeditions to the Antarctic. He was one of the principal figures of the period known as the Heroic Age of Antarctic Exploration.

February

February 1 is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 333 days remaining until the end of the year.

Lisbon Regicide February 1908 murder on the king and crown prince of Portugal

The Lisbon Regicide was the murder of King Carlos I of Portugal and the Algarves and his heir-apparent, Luís Filipe, Prince Royal of Portugal, by assassins sympathetic to Republican interests and aided by elements within the Portuguese Carbonária, disenchanted politicians and anti-monarchists. The events occurred on 1 February 1908 at the Praça do Comércio along the banks of the Tagus River in Lisbon, commonly referred to by its antiquated name Terreiro do Paço.

Carlos I of Portugal Portuguese prince

Dom Carlos I known as the Diplomat ; Portuguese: o Diplomata and Portuguese: o Martirizado; 28 September 1863 – 1 February 1908) was the King of Portugal. He was the first Portuguese king to die a violent death since Sebastian in 1578.

March

March is the third month of the year and named after Mars in both the Julian and Gregorian calendars. It is the second of seven months to have a length of 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere, the meteorological beginning of spring occurs on the first day of March. The March equinox on the 20 or 21 marks the astronomical beginning of spring in the Northern Hemisphere and the beginning of autumn in the Southern Hemisphere, where September is the seasonal equivalent of the Northern Hemisphere's March. Birthday Number the letter "M".

<i>The Childrens Encyclopædia</i> book by Arthur Mee

The Children's Encyclopædia was an encyclopædia originated by Arthur Mee, and published by the Educational Book Company, a subsidiary of Amalgamated Press of London. It was published from 1908 to 1964. Walter M. Jackson's company Grolier acquired the rights to publish it in the U.S. under the name The Book of Knowledge (1910).

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 302 days remaining until the end of the year.

April

May

June

Evidence of the Tunguska event (June 30). Photo taken 19 years later. Tunguska event fallen trees.jpg
Evidence of the Tunguska event (June 30). Photo taken 19 years later.

July

1908 Summer Olympics Olympic games 1908 London.jpg
1908 Summer Olympics

August

September

October

November

December

Date unknown

Births

January

Simone de Beauvoir Simone de Beauvoir2.png
Simone de Beauvoir
Stephane Grappelli StephaneGrappelli25.JPG
Stéphane Grappelli

February

Amintore Fanfani Amintore Fanfani 1983-04-14.jpg
Amintore Fanfani
Romulo Betancourt RB 1975.jpg
Rómulo Betancourt
William McMahon William McMahon 1966.jpg
William McMahon

March

Walter Bruch behind camera Olympia-Kanone 1936.jpg
Walter Bruch behind camera
Rex Harrison Rex Harrison Allan Warren.jpg
Rex Harrison
Michael Redgrave Sir Michael Redgrave portrait.jpg
Michael Redgrave
David Lean DavidLean1965.jpg
David Lean

April

Bette Davis Bette Davis - portrait.jpg
Bette Davis
Herbert von Karajan Bundesarchiv Bild 183-S47421, Herbert von Karajan.jpg
Herbert von Karajan
Bjarni Benediktsson Bjarni Benediktsson 1964 cropped.jpg
Bjarni Benediktsson

May

Percy Williams Percy Williams 1928.jpg
Percy Williams
James Stewart Annex - Stewart, James (Call Northside 777) 01.jpg
James Stewart
John Bardeen Bardeen.jpg
John Bardeen
Mel Blanc Mel Blanc (1976).jpg
Mel Blanc
Don Ameche Don Ameche 1964.JPG
Don Ameche

June

Salvador Allende Salvador Allende Gossens-.jpg
Salvador Allende
Estrellita Castro Estrellita Castro.JPG
Estrellita Castro

July

Thurgood Marshall Thurgood-marshall-2.jpg
Thurgood Marshall
Nelson Rockefeller Nelson Rockefeller.jpg
Nelson Rockefeller

August

Harold Holt Harold Holt 1964.jpg
Harold Holt
Gene Raymond Gene Raymond.jpg
Gene Raymond
Edgar Faure Edgar Faure 1955.jpg
Edgar Faure
Lyndon B. Johnson 37 Lyndon Johnson 3x4.jpg
Lyndon B. Johnson

September

Richard Wright Richard Wright.jpg
Richard Wright
Ahmed Balafrej Balafrej2wiki.png
Ahmed Balafrej
Penny Singleton Pennysingleton-3 crop.jpg
Penny Singleton
Eddie Tolan Eddie Tolan 1932.jpg
Eddie Tolan

October

Carole Lombard Carole Lombard 1940.jpg
Carole Lombard
Baek Du-jin Baek Du-jin.jpg
Baek Du-jin
Arturo Frondizi Arturo Frondizi.jpg
Arturo Frondizi

November

Giovanni Leone Leone303.jpg
Giovanni Leone
Libertad Lamarque Libertad Lamarque.jpg
Libertad Lamarque
Joseph McCarthy Joseph McCarthy.jpg
Joseph McCarthy
Claude Levi-Strauss Levi-strauss 260.jpg
Claude Lévi-Strauss

December

Carlos Arias Navarro Carlos Arias Navarro 1975.jpg
Carlos Arias Navarro
Morey Amsterdam Morey Amsterdam HA-SN-99-00637.jpg
Morey Amsterdam
Simon Wiesenthal Simon Wiesenthal (1982).jpg
Simon Wiesenthal

Date Unknown

Deaths

JanuaryJune

Wilhelm Busch Wilhelm Busch.jpg
Wilhelm Busch
Carlos I of Portugal Carlos I de Portugal.jpg
Carlos I of Portugal
Henry Campbell-Bannerman Picture of Henry Campbell-Bannerman.jpg
Henry Campbell-Bannerman
Prince Yamashina Kikumaro HIH Yamashina Kikumaro on Yagumo.jpg
Prince Yamashina Kikumaro
Grover Cleveland StephenGroverCleveland.png
Grover Cleveland

JulyDecember

Demetrius Vikelas Demetrius Vikelas.jpg
Demetrius Vikelas
Henri Becquerel Portrait of Antoine-Henri Becquerel.jpg
Henri Becquerel
Servant of God John Berthier Jan Berther.JPG
Servant of God John Berthier
Tomas Estrada Palma Tomas estrada palma.jpg
Tomas Estrada Palma
Emperor Guangxu of China Emperor Guangxu.jpg
Emperor Guangxu of China

Date unknown

Nobel Prizes

Nobel medal.png

Related Research Articles

1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1951st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 951st year of the 2nd millennium, the 51st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1950s decade.

1911 Year

1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1911th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 911th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1911, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1957th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 957th year of the 2nd millennium, the 57th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1950s decade.

1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1931st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 931st year of the 2nd millennium, the 31st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1930s decade.

1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1912th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 912th year of the 2nd millennium, the 12th year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1912, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. A key event of this year was the sinking of the infamous RMS Titanic

1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1901st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 901st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1901, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1943rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 943rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 43rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1940s decade.

1905 (MCMV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1905th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 905th year of the 2nd millennium, the 5th year of the 20th century, and the 6th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1905, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1903rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 903rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 3rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1903, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1907th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 907th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 20th century, and the 8th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1907, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1906th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 906th year of the 2nd millennium, the 6th year of the 20th century, and the 7th year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1906, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1902nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 902nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 2nd year of the 20th century, and the 3rd year of the 1900s decade. As of the start of 1902, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1924 (MCMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1924th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 924th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1920s decade.

1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1910th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 910th year of the 2nd millennium, the 10th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1910s decade. As of the start of 1910, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1881 (MDCCCLXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1881st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 881st year of the 2nd millennium, the 81st year of the 19th century, and the 2nd year of the 1880s decade. As of the start of 1881, the Gregorian calendar was 12 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1921st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 921st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 20th century, and the 2nd year of the 1920s decade. As of the start of 1921, the Gregorian calendar was 13 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1933rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 933rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 33rd year of the 20th century, and the 4th year of the 1930s decade.

1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1930th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 930th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1930s decade.

1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1934th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 934th year of the 2nd millennium, the 34th year of the 20th century, and the 5th year of the 1930s decade.

1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar, the 1950th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 950th year of the 2nd millennium, the 50th year of the 20th century, and the 1st year of the 1950s decade.

References

  1. NASA - GISS Surface Temperature Analysis (GISTEMP)
  2. "NO PUBLIC SMOKING BY WOMEN NOW". The New York Times. 1908-01-21. p. 1. Retrieved 2018-01-27.
  3. "Qualcosa di speciale? La Patch 105". Qualcosa di speciale?. Retrieved 2013-10-03.
  4. "Ballarat Genealogy: Newspaper Report of the accident". ballaratgenealogy.org.au. Archived from the original on February 11, 2012.
  5. Pasechnik, I. P. (1986). "Refinement of the moment of explosion of the Tunguska meteorite from the seismic data". Cosmic Matter and the Earth (in Russian). Novosibirsk: Nauka. p. 66.
  6. Farinella, Paolo; Foschini, L.; Froeschlé, Christiane; Gonczi, R.; Jopek, T. J.; Longo, G.; Michel, Patrick (2001). "Probable asteroidal origin of the Tunguska Cosmic Body" (PDF). Astronomy & Astrophysics . 377: 1081–1097. Bibcode:2001A&A...377.1081F. doi:10.1051/0004-6361:20011054 . Retrieved 2011-08-23.
  7. Trayner, Chris (1994). "Perplexities of the Tunguska Meteorite". The Observatory . 114: 227–231. Bibcode:1994Obs...114..227T . Retrieved 2011-08-23.
  8. "Therese Peltier". Women in aviation and space history. Retrieved 2017-05-07.
  9. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  10. Blake, Richard. The Book of Postal Dates, 1635-1985. Caterham: Marden. p. 20.
  11. 日立製作所#歴史♯沿革 (Japanese language edition) Retribured date 16 December, 2018.

Further reading