Boyertown, Pennsylvania

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Boyertown, Pennsylvania

Boyerschteddel
Boyertown - Cannonhill.JPG
Boyertown viewed from atop Cannon Hill
Boyertown.png
Location of Boyertown in Berks County, Pennsylvania.
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Boyertown
Location of Boyertown in Pennsylvania
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Boyertown
Boyertown (the United States)
Coordinates: 40°19′53″N75°38′10″W / 40.33139°N 75.63611°W / 40.33139; -75.63611 Coordinates: 40°19′53″N75°38′10″W / 40.33139°N 75.63611°W / 40.33139; -75.63611
CountryUnited States
State Pennsylvania
County Berks
Area
[1]
  Total0.77 sq mi (2.00 km2)
  Land0.77 sq mi (2.00 km2)
  Water0.00 sq mi (0.00 km2)
Elevation
407 ft (124 m)
Population
 (2010)
  Total4,055
  Estimate 
(2019) [2]
4,071
  Density5,266.49/sq mi (2,032.60/km2)
Time zone UTC-5 (EST)
  Summer (DST) UTC-4 (EDT)
ZIP Code
19512
Area code(s) 610 Exchanges: 367,369,473
Website boyertownborough.org

Boyertown (Pennsylvania German: Boyerschteddel) is a borough in Berks County, Pennsylvania, United States. The population was 4,055 at the 2010 census. [3] This was approximately a 2.9% population growth since the 2000 U.S. Census. Boyertown is known for the many painted fiberglass bears that can be found throughout the town and borough.

Contents

History

A post office called Boyertown has been in operation since 1828. [4] The community was named for its founders, brothers Henry and Daniel Boyer. [5]

In 1908, Boyertown was the site of the Rhoads Opera House fire. [6]

Geography

Boyertown is located along the southeastern border of Berks County. It is bordered on the north, west, and south by Colebrookdale Township; to the southeast it is bordered by Douglass Township in Montgomery County.

Boyertown is included in the Reading Metropolitan Statistical Area, which is further included in the Philadelphia-Reading-Camden Combined Statistical Area

According to the United States Census Bureau, Boyertown has a total area of 0.77 square miles (2.0 km2), all of it land. [3] It has a hot-summer humid continental climate (Dfa) and average monthly temperatures range from 30.0 °F in January to 74.7 °F in July. The hardiness zone is 6b.

Demographics

Historical population
CensusPop.
1870 690
1880 1,09959.3%
1890 1,43630.7%
1900 1,70919.0%
1910 2,43342.4%
1920 3,18931.1%
1930 3,94323.6%
1940 3,9831.0%
1950 4,0742.3%
1960 4,067−0.2%
1970 4,4288.9%
1980 3,979−10.1%
1990 3,759−5.5%
2000 3,9404.8%
2010 4,0552.9%
2019 (est.)4,071 [2] 0.4%
Sources: [7] [8] [9]

As of the census [8] of 2000, there were 3,940 people, 1,805 households, and 1,025 families residing in the borough. The population density was 4,941.7 people per square mile (1,901.6/km2). There were 1,885 housing units at an average density of 2,364.2 per square mile (909.8/km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 98.83% White, 0.20% African American, 0.03% Native American, 0.36% Asian, 0.13% from other races, and 0.46% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 0.74% of the population.

There were 1,805 households, out of which 24.2% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 44.4% were married couples living together, 8.5% had a female householder, and 43.2% were non-families. 37.5% of all households were made up of individuals, and 19.3% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.17 and the average family size was 2.87.

In the borough the population was spread out, with 21.1% under the age of 18, 7.5% from 18 to 24, 29.2% from 25 to 44, 21.0% from 45 to 64, and 21.2% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 40 years. For every 100 females there were 92.5 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 87.7 males.

The median income for a household in the borough was $39,232, and the median income for a family was $52,943. Males had a median income of $33,783 versus $26,507 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $21,194. About 3.6% of families and 6.0% of the population were below the poverty line, including 5.6% of those under age 18 and 7.5% of those age 65 or over.

Transportation

Pennsylvania Route 73 (Philadelphia Avenue) is the main east–west road through the borough. It leads east-southeast to Schwenksville and eventually Northeast Philadelphia. To the northwest it leads to Blandon north of Reading. Pennsylvania Route 562 (Reading Avenue) leads west to Reading proper. Pennsylvania Route 100 bypasses the borough just outside its eastern border, leading north to Macungie near Allentown and south into Pottstown. A railroad line runs south from Boyertown to Pottstown. This line is used by the Colebrookdale Railroad tourist line and the Eastern Berks Gateway Railroad freight line.

Public education

The borough is served by the Boyertown Area School District.This includes one senior high school, two middle schools, seven elementary schools, and a cyber school program. [10]

Media

The area is served by The Berks-Mont News, a weekly paper with a circulation of 5,500.

Landmarks

Notable people

Sister cities

Boyertown has one sister city, as designated by Sister Cities International:

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References

  1. "2019 U.S. Gazetteer Files". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved July 28, 2020.
  2. 1 2 "Population and Housing Unit Estimates". United States Census Bureau. May 24, 2020. Retrieved May 27, 2020.
  3. 1 2 "Geographic Identifiers: 2010 Demographic Profile Data (G001): Boyertown borough, Pennsylvania". U.S. Census Bureau, American Factfinder. Archived from the original on February 12, 2020. Retrieved March 6, 2014.
  4. "Berks County". Jim Forte Postal History. Archived from the original on 13 January 2016. Retrieved 2 December 2015.
  5. "Rhoads family of Berks and its doctor poet". Reading Eagle. Nov 28, 1920. p. 22. Retrieved 2 December 2015.
  6. Schneider, Mary Jane (1991) Midwinter Mourning: The Boyertown Opera House Fire. MJS Publications
  7. "Census of Population and Housing". U.S. Census Bureau. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  8. 1 2 "U.S. Census website". United States Census Bureau . Retrieved 2008-01-31.
  9. "Incorporated Places and Minor Civil Divisions Datasets: Subcounty Resident Population Estimates: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2012". Population Estimates. U.S. Census Bureau. Archived from the original on 11 June 2013. Retrieved 11 December 2013.
  10. https://www.boyertownasd.org/