December 13

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December 13 is the 347th day of the year(348th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 18 days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

902 Year

Year 902 (CMII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The Battle of the Holme took place in East Anglia on 13 December 902 between the Anglo-Saxon men of Kent and the East Anglian Danes. Its location is unknown but may have been Holme in Huntingdonshire.

Vikings Norse explorers, warriors, merchants, and pirates

Vikings were Norse seafarers, mainly speaking the Old Norse language, who, from the late 8th to late 11th centuries, raided and traded from their Northern European homelands across wide areas of Europe, and explored westwards to Iceland, Greenland, and Vinland. The term is also commonly extended in modern English and other vernaculars to the inhabitants of Norse home communities during what has become known as the Viking Age. This period of Nordic military, mercantile and demographic expansion constitutes an important element in the early medieval history of Scandinavia, Estonia, the British Isles, France, Kievan Rus' and Sicily.

Births

Year 1272 (MCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Frederick III of Sicily King of Sicily

Frederick II was the regent and subsequent King of Sicily from 1295 until his death. He was the third son of Peter III of Aragon and served in the War of the Sicilian Vespers on behalf of his father and brothers, Alfonso ΙΙΙ and James ΙΙ. He was confirmed as King of Trinacria by the Peace of Caltabellotta in 1302. His reign saw important constitutional reforms: the Constitutiones regales, Capitula alia, and Ordinationes generales.

Year 1363 (MCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

558 Year

Year 558 (DLVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 558 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Childebert I Frankish King

Childebert I was a Frankish King of the Merovingian dynasty, as third of the four sons of Clovis I who shared the kingdom of the Franks upon their father's death in 511. He was one of the sons of Saint Clotilda, born at Reims. He reigned as King of Paris from 511 to 558 and Orléans from 524 to 558.

769 Year

Year 769 (DCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 769 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Holidays and observances

Acadians descendants of the 17th-century French colonists who settled in Acadia

The Acadians are the descendants of French colonists who settled in Acadia during the 17th and 18th centuries, some of whom are also descended from the Indigenous peoples of the region. The colony was located in what is now Eastern Canada's Maritime provinces, as well as part of Quebec, and present-day Maine to the Kennebec River. Acadia was a distinctly separate colony of New France. It was geographically and administratively separate from the French colony of Canada. As a result, the Acadians and Québécois developed two distinct histories and cultures. The settlers whose descendants became Acadians came from many areas in France, but especially regions such as Île-de-France, Normandy, Brittany, Poitou and Aquitaine.

Antiochus of Sulcis Christian martyr

Saint Antiochus of Sulcis was an early Christian martyr of Sardinia. The island and town of Sant'Antioco are named after him. He is a figure associated with the Sardinian mines from which the Romans extracted minerals and precious metals; the Romans condemned prisoners of war and Christians to work these mines.

Saint Judoc, Saint Joyce, or otherwise known as Saint Josse was a seventh-century Breton noble. Though he was never officially canonized, Saint Judoc is considered to be a saint. Judoc was a son of Juthael, King of Brittany. He renounced his wealth and position to become a priest and lived alone for the rest of his lifetime in the coastal forest near the mouth of the River Cache.

Related Research Articles

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September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 13 is the 256th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 109 days remain until the end of the year.

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References

  1. "Train Crash in Ankara, Turkey, Kills at Least 9 and Injures Dozens". The New York Times. Retrieved 2018-12-15.
  2. Guillaume Henri Marie Posthumus Meyjes (1999). Jean Gerson, Apostle of Unity: His Church Politics and Ecclesiology. BRILL. p. 13. ISBN   90-04-11296-0.
  3. Alban Butler; Paul Burns (1 January 1995). Butler's Lives of the Saints. A&C Black. p. 124. ISBN   978-0-86012-260-9.
  4. Theodore Kübler (1865). Historical Notes to the Lyra Germanica: Containing Brief Memoirs of the Authors of the Hymns Therein Translated, and Notices of Remarkable Occasions on which Some of Them, Or Any of Their Verses, Have Been Used ; with Notices of Other German Hymn-writers Represented in Other English Collections. Longman, Green, Longman, Roberts, & Green. p. 332.
  5. Sawyers, June Skinner (2012). Chicago Portraits: New Edition. Northwestern University Press. p. 29. ISBN   9780810126497.
  6. "Journalist Noah Kliger passes away at 92". Ynetnews. 2018-12-13. Retrieved 2018-12-13.