1404

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1404 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1404
MCDIV
Ab urbe condita 2157
Armenian calendar 853
ԹՎ ՊԾԳ
Assyrian calendar 6154
Balinese saka calendar 1325–1326
Bengali calendar 811
Berber calendar 2354
English Regnal year 5  Hen. 4   6  Hen. 4
Buddhist calendar 1948
Burmese calendar 766
Byzantine calendar 6912–6913
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4100 or 4040
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4101 or 4041
Coptic calendar 1120–1121
Discordian calendar 2570
Ethiopian calendar 1396–1397
Hebrew calendar 5164–5165
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1460–1461
 - Shaka Samvat 1325–1326
 - Kali Yuga 4504–4505
Holocene calendar 11404
Igbo calendar 404–405
Iranian calendar 782–783
Islamic calendar 806–807
Japanese calendar Ōei 11
(応永11年)
Javanese calendar 1318–1319
Julian calendar 1404
MCDIV
Korean calendar 3737
Minguo calendar 508 before ROC
民前508年
Nanakshahi calendar −64
Thai solar calendar 1946–1947
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1530 or 1149 or 377
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1531 or 1150 or 378

Year 1404 ( MCDIV ) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Pope Boniface IX pope

Pope Boniface IX was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 2 November 1389 to his death. He was the second Roman pope of the Western Schism. During this time the Avignon claimants, Clement VII and Benedict XIII, maintained the Roman Curia in Avignon, under the protection of the French monarchy.

Year 1389 (MCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1503 Calendar year

Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1073 Calendar year

Year 1073 (MLXXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Calendar year

Year 1509 (MDIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1342 Calendar year

Year 1342

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1378 (MCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1397 (MCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1418 (MCDXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1432 (MCDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1435 Calendar year

Year 1435 (MCDXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1295 (MCCXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1032 Calendar year

Year 1032 (MXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Louis II of Anjou King of Naples

Louis II was Duke of Anjou and Count of Provence from 1384 to 1417; he claimed the Kingdom of Naples, but only ruled parts of the kingdom from 1390 to 1399. His father, Louis I of Anjou—the founder of the House of Valois-Anjou—was a younger son of King John II of France and the adopted son of Queen Joanna I of Naples. When his father died during a military campaign in Naples in 1384, Louis II was still a child. He inherited Anjou from his father, but his mother, Marie of Blois, could not convince his uncles, John, Duke of Berry and Philip II, Duke of Burgundy, to continue her husband's war for Naples. The Provençal nobles and towns refused to acknowledge Louis II as their lawful ruler, but Marie of Blois persuaded them one after another to swear fealty to him between 1385 and 1387.

House of Capet Rulers of the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328

The House of Capet or the Direct Capetians, also called the House of France, or simply the Capets, ruled the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328. It was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians. Historians in the 19th century came to apply the name "Capetian" to both the ruling house of France and to the wider-spread male-line descendants of Hugh Capet. Contemporaries did not use the name "Capetian". The Capets were sometimes called "the third race of kings". The name "Capet" derives from the nickname given to Hugh, the first Capetian King, who became known as Hugh Capet.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Longmate, Norman (1990). Defending the Island. London: Grafton. ISBN   0-586-20845-3.
  2. Mortimer, Ian (2007). The Fears of Henry IV. London: Jonathan Cape. ISBN   978-0-224-07300-4.