1404

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1404 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1404
MCDIV
Ab urbe condita 2157
Armenian calendar 853
ԹՎ ՊԾԳ
Assyrian calendar 6154
Balinese saka calendar 1325–1326
Bengali calendar 811
Berber calendar 2354
English Regnal year 5  Hen. 4   6  Hen. 4
Buddhist calendar 1948
Burmese calendar 766
Byzantine calendar 6912–6913
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4100 or 4040
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4101 or 4041
Coptic calendar 1120–1121
Discordian calendar 2570
Ethiopian calendar 1396–1397
Hebrew calendar 5164–5165
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1460–1461
 - Shaka Samvat 1325–1326
 - Kali Yuga 4504–4505
Holocene calendar 11404
Igbo calendar 404–405
Iranian calendar 782–783
Islamic calendar 806–807
Japanese calendar Ōei 11
(応永11年)
Javanese calendar 1318–1319
Julian calendar 1404
MCDIV
Korean calendar 3737
Minguo calendar 508 before ROC
民前508年
Nanakshahi calendar −64
Thai solar calendar 1946–1947
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1530 or 1149 or 377
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1531 or 1150 or 378

Year 1404 ( MCDIV ) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Tuesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are FE, such as the years 1884, 1924, 1952, 1980, 2008, 2036, 2064, 2092, and 2104 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1964, 1992, and 2020 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in June. Common years starting on Wednesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

June 14 is the 165th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 200 days remaining until the end of the year.

Owain Glyndŵr Prince of Wales

Owain Glyndŵr, or Owain Glyn Dŵr, was a Welsh ruler and the last native Welshman to hold the title Prince of Wales. He instigated a fierce and long-running, yet ultimately unsuccessful war of independence with the aim of ending English rule in Wales. The traditional spelling in English is Owen Glendower.

Prince of Wales title granted to princes born in Wales

Prince of Wales was a title granted to princes born in Wales from the 12th century onwards; the term replaced the use of the word king. One of the last Welsh princes, Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, was killed in battle in 1282 by Edward I, King of England, whose son Edward was invested as the first English Prince of Wales in 1301.

Date unknown

Jean de Béthencourt French explorer

Jean de Béthencourt (1362–1425) was a French explorer who in 1402 led an expedition to the Canary Islands, landing first on the north side of Lanzarote. From there he conquered for Castile the islands of Fuerteventura (1405) and El Hierro, ousting their local chieftains. Béthencourt received the title King of the Canary Islands but he recognized King Henry III of Castile, who had provided aid during the conquest, as his overlord.

The Kingdom of the Canary Islands was founded in 1404, although it had always recognized another country as their overlord. Its purpose was probably entirely to conquer the Canaries, and to eventually be fully incorporated into the Crown of Castile when complete.

Kingdom of Bosnia medieval kingdom that evolved from the Banate of Bosnia

The Kingdom of Bosnia, or Bosnian Kingdom, was a South Slavic medieval Kingdom that evolved from the Banate of Bosnia (1154–1377). Bosnia experienced de facto independence in the 13th and 14th centuries despite being a part of the Hungarian Crown Lands. Its difficult terrain and remoteness enabled the Bosnians to maneuver between their two powerful neighbors, Hungary and Serbia, usually managing to avoid subordination to either. Several capable rulers allowed Bosnia briefly to play the role of a regional power in the 14th century. After 1290, Bosnia enjoyed virtual independence from Hungary and gained significant territory in Dalmatia at Serbia's expense. King Tvrtko I acquired portions of western Serbia and most of the Adriatic coast south of the Neretva river: during the latter part of his reign, Bosnia briefly became the strongest state in the Balkans peninsula. However, feudal fragmentation remained strong in Bosnia, and after his death the country lost its importance. The Ottoman Empire annexed portions of eastern Bosnia in the 1440s and 1450s and went on to conquer Herzegovina until the last fortress fell in 1481.

Births

January 18 is the 18th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 347 days remaining until the end of the year.

Philip Courtenay (died 1463) senior member of a junior branch of the powerful Courtenay family of England

Sir Philip Courtenay of Powderham, Devon, was the senior member of a junior branch of the powerful Courtenay family, Earls of Devon.

Year 1463 (MCDLXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

April 27 is the 117th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 248 days remaining until the end of the year.

Year 1342 (MCCCXLII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

Year 1389 (MCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1503 Year

Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

1055 Year

Year 1055 (MLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Year

Year 1509 (MDIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1468 (MCDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1397 (MCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1418 (MCDXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1432 (MCDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1435 Year

Year 1435 (MCDXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1295 (MCCXCV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1032 Year

Year 1032 (MXXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1047 Year

Year 1047 (MXLVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1198 (MCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

House of Capet rulers of the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328, was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians

The House of Capet or the Direct Capetians, also called the House of France, or simply the Capets, ruled the Kingdom of France from 987 to 1328. It was the most senior line of the Capetian dynasty – itself a derivative dynasty from the Robertians. Historians in the 19th century came to apply the name "Capetian" to both the ruling house of France and to the wider-spread male-line descendants of Hugh Capet. Contemporaries did not use the name "Capetian". The Capets were sometimes called "the third race of kings". The name "Capet" derives from the nickname given to Hugh, the first Capetian King, who became known as Hugh Capet.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References