1344

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1344 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1344
MCCCXLIV
Ab urbe condita 2097
Armenian calendar 793
ԹՎ ՉՂԳ
Assyrian calendar 6094
Balinese saka calendar 1265–1266
Bengali calendar 751
Berber calendar 2294
English Regnal year 17  Edw. 3   18  Edw. 3
Buddhist calendar 1888
Burmese calendar 706
Byzantine calendar 6852–6853
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4040 or 3980
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4041 or 3981
Coptic calendar 1060–1061
Discordian calendar 2510
Ethiopian calendar 1336–1337
Hebrew calendar 5104–5105
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1400–1401
 - Shaka Samvat 1265–1266
 - Kali Yuga 4444–4445
Holocene calendar 11344
Igbo calendar 344–345
Iranian calendar 722–723
Islamic calendar 744–745
Japanese calendar Kōei 3
(康永3年)
Javanese calendar 1256–1257
Julian calendar 1344
MCCCXLIV
Korean calendar 3677
Minguo calendar 568 before ROC
民前568年
Nanakshahi calendar −124
Thai solar calendar 1886–1887
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1470 or 1089 or 317
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1471 or 1090 or 318

Year 1344 ( MCCCXLIV ) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Related Research Articles

The 1310s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1310, and ended on December 31, 1319.

The 1340s were a Julian calendar decade in the 14th century, in the midst of a period in world history often referred to as the Late Middle Ages in the Old World and the pre-Columbian era in the New World.

Year 1343 (MCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1340 (MCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1409 (MCDIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1434 (MCDXXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1449 (MCDXLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1301 (MCCCI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1208 (MCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1201 (MCCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1239 (MCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1148 (MCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1171 (MCLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1278 (MCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1288 (MCCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Peter IV of Aragon King of Aragon

Peter IV, called the Ceremonious, was from 1336 until his death the King of Aragon and also King of Sardinia and Corsica, King of Valencia, and Count of Barcelona. In 1344, he deposed James III of Majorca and made himself King of Majorca.

James II of Aragon King of Sicily

James II, called the Just, was the King of Aragon and Valencia and Count of Barcelona from 1291 to 1327. He was also the King of Sicily from 1285 to 1295 and the King of Majorca from 1291 to 1298. From 1297 he was nominally the King of Sardinia and Corsica, but he only acquired the island of Sardinia by conquest in 1324. His full title for the last three decades of his reign was "James, by the grace of God, king of Aragon, Valencia, Sardinia and Corsica, and count of Barcelona".

Kingdom of Majorca former country

The Kingdom of Majorca was a realm on the east coast of Spain, including Mediterranean islands, and founded by James I of Aragon, also known as James The Conqueror. After the death of his firstborn son Alfonso, a will was written in 1262 and created the kingdom to cede it to his son James. The disposition was maintained during successive versions of his will and so when James I died in 1276, the Crown of Aragon passed to his eldest son Peter, known as Peter III of Aragon or Peter the Great. The Kingdom of Majorca passed to James, who reigned under the name of James II of Majorca. After 1279, Peter III of Aragon established that the king of Majorca was a vassal to the king of Aragon. The title continued to be employed by the Aragonese and Spanish monarchs until its dissolution by the 1715 Nueva Planta decrees.

Aragonese Crusade

The Aragonese Crusade or Crusade of Aragon, a part of the larger War of the Sicilian Vespers, was declared by Pope Martin IV against the King of Aragon, Peter III the Great, in 1284 and 1285. Because of the recent conquest of Sicily by Peter, the Pope declared a crusade against him and officially deposed him as king, on the grounds that Aragon was a papal fief: Peter's grandfather and namesake, Peter II, had surrendered the kingdom as a fief to the Holy See. Martin bestowed Aragon on Charles, Count of Valois, son of the French king, Philip III, and nephew of Peter III.

References

  1. Lock, Peter (2013). The Routledge Companion to the Crusades. Routledge. p. 127. ISBN   9781135131371.