1301

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1301 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1301
MCCCI
Ab urbe condita 2054
Armenian calendar 750
ԹՎ ՉԾ
Assyrian calendar 6051
Balinese saka calendar 1222–1223
Bengali calendar 708
Berber calendar 2251
English Regnal year 29  Edw. 1   30  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1845
Burmese calendar 663
Byzantine calendar 6809–6810
Chinese calendar 庚子(Metal  Rat)
3997 or 3937
     to 
辛丑年 (Metal  Ox)
3998 or 3938
Coptic calendar 1017–1018
Discordian calendar 2467
Ethiopian calendar 1293–1294
Hebrew calendar 5061–5062
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1357–1358
 - Shaka Samvat 1222–1223
 - Kali Yuga 4401–4402
Holocene calendar 11301
Igbo calendar 301–302
Iranian calendar 679–680
Islamic calendar 700–701
Japanese calendar Shōan 3
(正安3年)
Javanese calendar 1212–1213
Julian calendar 1301
MCCCI
Korean calendar 3634
Minguo calendar 611 before ROC
民前611年
Nanakshahi calendar −167
Thai solar calendar 1843–1844
Tibetan calendar 阳金鼠年
(male Iron-Rat)
1427 or 1046 or 274
     to 
阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1428 or 1047 or 275

Year 1301 ( MCCCI ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 351 days remain until the end of the year.

Andrew III of Hungary 13th-century King of Hungary and Croatia

Andrew III the Venetian was King of Hungary and Croatia between 1290 and 1301. His father, Stephen the Posthumous, was the posthumous son of Andrew II of Hungary although Stephen's brothers considered him a bastard. Andrew grew up in Venice, and first arrived in Hungary upon the invitation of a rebellious baron, Ivan Kőszegi, in 1278. Kőszegi tried to play Andrew off against Ladislaus IV of Hungary, but the conspiracy collapsed and Andrew returned to Venice.

The Árpáds or Arpads was the ruling dynasty of the Principality of Hungary in the 9th and 10th centuries and of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1000 to 1301. The dynasty was named after Grand Prince Árpád who was the head of the Hungarian tribal federation during the conquest of the Carpathian Basin, c. 895. It is also referred to as the Turul dynasty, but rarely.

Births

July 23 is the 204th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 161 days remain until the end of the year.

Otto, Duke of Austria Duke of Austria

Otto , the Merry, a member of the House of Habsburg, was Duke of Austria and Styria from 1330, as well as Duke of Carinthia from 1335 until his death. He ruled jointly with his elder brother Duke Albert II.

Year 1339 (MCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

1265 Year

Year 1265 (MCCLXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

September 3 is the 246th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 119 days remain until the end of the year.

Alberto I della Scala Italian noble

Alberto I della Scala was lord of Verona from 1277, a member of the Scaliger family.

Related Research Articles

Year 1326 (MCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1314 (MCCCLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1402 (MCDII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1451 (MCDLI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1554 Year

Year 1554 (MDLIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1614 Year

1614 (MDCXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1614th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 614th year of the 2nd millennium, the 14th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1614, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year Bb1308Bb (MCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1338 (MCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1344 (MCCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1372 (MCCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1321 (MCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1328 (MCCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1330 (MCCCXXX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1272 (MCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1031 Year

Year 1031 (MXXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Franz, Duke of Bavaria Pretender to the Bavaian throne

Franz, Duke of Bavaria is head of the House of Wittelsbach, the former ruling family of the Kingdom of Bavaria. His great-grandfather King Ludwig III was the last ruling monarch of Bavaria until deposed in 1918.

References

  1. 1 2 Július Bartl; Dusan Skvarna (2002). Slovak History: Chronology & Lexicon. Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers. pp. 34–. ISBN   978-0-86516-444-4.
  2. Anne Commire (October 8, 1999). Women in World History. Gale. ISBN   978-0-7876-4061-3.
  3. Chris Given-Wilson (2010). Fourteenth Century England VI. Boydell & Brewer. p. 27. ISBN   978-1-84383-530-1.
  4. Magna Carta Ancestry: A Study in Colonial and Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. Douglas Richardson. p. 3. ISBN   978-1-4610-4520-5.
  5. Sergeĭ Mikhaĭlovich Solovʹev (1976). History of Russia: Russian society, 1389-1425. Academic International Press. ISBN   978-0-87569-228-9.
  6. Kirsten A. Seaver (November 30, 2014). The Last Vikings: The Epic Story of the Great Norse Voyagers. I.B.Tauris. p. 124. ISBN   978-1-78453-057-0.
  7. Paul S. Bruckman (June 7, 2011). La Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy) : Purgatorio: La Divina Commedia (The Divine Comedy) : Purgatorio a Translation into English in Iambic Pentameter, Terza Rima Form. Xlibris Corporation. p. 818. ISBN   978-1-4568-7895-5.