1330

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1330 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1330
MCCCXXX
Ab urbe condita 2083
Armenian calendar 779
ԹՎ ՉՀԹ
Assyrian calendar 6080
Balinese saka calendar 1251–1252
Bengali calendar 737
Berber calendar 2280
English Regnal year 3  Edw. 3   4  Edw. 3
Buddhist calendar 1874
Burmese calendar 692
Byzantine calendar 6838–6839
Chinese calendar 己巳(Earth  Snake)
4026 or 3966
     to 
庚午年 (Metal  Horse)
4027 or 3967
Coptic calendar 1046–1047
Discordian calendar 2496
Ethiopian calendar 1322–1323
Hebrew calendar 5090–5091
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1386–1387
 - Shaka Samvat 1251–1252
 - Kali Yuga 4430–4431
Holocene calendar 11330
Igbo calendar 330–331
Iranian calendar 708–709
Islamic calendar 730–731
Japanese calendar Gentoku 2
(元徳2年)
Javanese calendar 1242–1243
Julian calendar 1330
MCCCXXX
Korean calendar 3663
Minguo calendar 582 before ROC
民前582年
Nanakshahi calendar −138
Thai solar calendar 1872–1873
Tibetan calendar 阴土蛇年
(female Earth-Snake)
1456 or 1075 or 303
     to 
阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1457 or 1076 or 304

Year 1330 ( MCCCXXX ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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The Battle of Posada (November 9-12, 1330) in Chronicon Pictum. The Basarab I of Wallachia's army ambushes Charles Robert of Anjou, king of Hungary and his 30,000-strong invading army. The Vlach (Romanian) warriors roll down rocks over the cliff edges in a place where the Hungarian mounted knights cannot escape from them nor climb the heights to dislodge the attackers. Viennese Illuminated Chronicle Posada.jpg
The Battle of Posada (November 9–12, 1330) in Chronicon Pictum. The Basarab I of Wallachia's army ambushes Charles Robert of Anjou, king of Hungary and his 30,000-strong invading army. The Vlach (Romanian) warriors roll down rocks over the cliff edges in a place where the Hungarian mounted knights cannot escape from them nor climb the heights to dislodge the attackers.

Related Research Articles

14th century Century

As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was a century lasting from January 1, 1301, through December 31, 1400. The term is often used to refer to the 1300s, the century between 1300 and 1399. It is estimated that the century witnessed the death of more than 45 million lives from political and natural disasters in both Europe and the Mongol Empire. West Africa and the Indian Subcontinent experienced economic growth and prosperity.

Year 1326 (MCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

The 1320s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1320, and ended on December 31, 1329.

Year 1341 (MCCCXLI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1374 (MCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1371 (MCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1330s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1330, and ended on December 31, 1339.

The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289.

Year 1355 (MCCCLV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1376 (MCCCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1292 (MCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

924 Calendar year

Year 924 (CMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Edmund Fitzalan, 2nd Earl of Arundel

Edmund Fitzalan, 9th Earl of Arundel was an English nobleman prominent in the conflict between King Edward II and his barons. His father, Richard Fitzalan, 1st Earl of Arundel, died in 1302, while Edmund was still a minor. He therefore became a ward of John de Warenne, Earl of Surrey, and married Warenne's granddaughter Alice. In 1306 he was styled Earl of Arundel, and served under Edward I in the Scottish Wars, for which he was richly rewarded.

Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March

Roger Mortimer, 3rd Baron Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, was an English nobleman and powerful Marcher lord who gained many estates in the Welsh Marches and Ireland following his advantageous marriage to the wealthy heiress Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville. In November 1316, he was appointed Lord Lieutenant of Ireland. He was imprisoned in the Tower of London in 1322 for having led the Marcher lords in a revolt against King Edward II in what became known as the Despenser War. He later escaped to France, where he was joined by Edward's queen consort Isabella, whom he may have taken as his mistress. After he and Isabella led a successful invasion and rebellion, Edward was deposed; Mortimer allegedly arranged his murder at Berkeley Castle. For three years, Mortimer was de facto ruler of England before being himself overthrown by Edward's eldest son, Edward III. Accused of assuming royal power and other crimes, Mortimer was executed by hanging at Tyburn.

Ivan Stephen of Bulgaria Tsar of Bulgaria

Ivan Stefan ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria for eight months from 1330 to 1331. He was the eldest son of emperor Michael III Shishman and Anna Neda of Serbia, a daughter of King Stefan Uroš II Milutin of Serbia. Ivan Stephen was a descendant of the Terter dynasty, the Asen dynasty and the Shishman dynasty. After his father's ascension to the throne in 1323 Ivan Stefan was associated as co-emperor. When Michael III Shishman divorced Anna Neda to marry Theodora Palaiologina, the daughter of Byzantine emperor Michael IX Palaiologos, in 1324, Ivan Stefan was exiled along with his mother and brother in a monastery. In the summer of 1330 he became emperor of Bulgaria with the help of his uncle Stephen Dečanski. After he was deposed in a coup d'état by the Tarnovo nobility, he fled along with Anna Neda in the domains of his father's brother Belaur in Niš and later to Dubrovnik. He was later expelled from there by Stephen Dušan under the pressure of Ivan Alexander. Ivan Stefan probably died in Naples.

Tsardom of Vidin

The Tsardom of Vidin was a medieval Bulgarian state centred in the city of Vidin.

Events from the 1330s in England.

This article is about the particular significance of the century 1301–1400 to Wales and its people.

Joan de Geneville, 2nd Baroness Geneville, Countess of March, Baroness Mortimer, also known as Jeanne de Joinville, was the daughter of Sir Piers de Geneville and Joan of Lusignan. She inherited the estates of her grandparents, Geoffrey de Geneville, 1st Baron Geneville, and Maud de Lacy, Baroness Geneville. She was one of the wealthiest heiresses in the Welsh Marches and County Meath, Ireland. She was the wife of Roger Mortimer, 1st Earl of March, the de facto ruler of England from 1327 to 1330. She succeeded as suo jure 2nd Baroness Geneville on 21 October 1314 upon the death of her grandfather, Geoffrey de Geneville.

References

  1. "Edward, the Black Prince (1330 - 1376)". bbc.co.uk. Retrieved January 3, 2017.
  2. Manzano Rodríguez, Miguel Angel (1992). La intervención de los Benimerines en la Península Ibérica (in Spanish). Editorial CSIC - CSIC Press. p. 351. ISBN   978-84-00-07220-9.