1291

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1291 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1291
MCCXCI
Ab urbe condita 2044
Armenian calendar 740
ԹՎ ՉԽ
Assyrian calendar 6041
Balinese saka calendar 1212–1213
Bengali calendar 698
Berber calendar 2241
English Regnal year 19  Edw. 1   20  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1835
Burmese calendar 653
Byzantine calendar 6799–6800
Chinese calendar 庚寅(Metal  Tiger)
3987 or 3927
     to 
辛卯年 (Metal  Rabbit)
3988 or 3928
Coptic calendar 1007–1008
Discordian calendar 2457
Ethiopian calendar 1283–1284
Hebrew calendar 5051–5052
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1347–1348
 - Shaka Samvat 1212–1213
 - Kali Yuga 4391–4392
Holocene calendar 11291
Igbo calendar 291–292
Iranian calendar 669–670
Islamic calendar 689–691
Japanese calendar Shōō 4
(正応4年)
Javanese calendar 1201–1202
Julian calendar 1291
MCCXCI
Korean calendar 3624
Minguo calendar 621 before ROC
民前621年
Nanakshahi calendar −177
Thai solar calendar 1833–1834
Tibetan calendar 阳金虎年
(male Iron-Tiger)
1417 or 1036 or 264
     to 
阴金兔年
(female Iron-Rabbit)
1418 or 1037 or 265

Year 1291 ( MCCXCI ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Related Research Articles

13th century Century

The 13th century was the century which lasted from January 1, 1201 through December 31, 1300 in accordance with the Julian calendar. After its conquests in Asia the Mongol Empire stretched from Eastern Asia to Eastern Europe, while the Muslim Delhi Sultanate conquered large parts of the Indian subcontinent. In the history of European culture, this period is considered part of the High Middle Ages.

Year 1282 (MCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1300s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1300, and ended on December 31, 1309.

The 1350s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1350, and ended on December 31, 1359.

The 1210s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1210, and ended on December 31, 1219.

The 1220s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1220, and ended on December 31, 1229.

The 1260s is the decade starting January 1, 1260 and ending December 31, 1269.

The 1280s is the decade starting January 1, 1280 and ending December 31, 1289.

The 1290s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1290, and ended on December 31, 1299.

Year 1356 (MCCCLVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1304 (MCCCIV) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1292 (MCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1210 (MCCX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1239 (MCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1249 (MCCXLIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1261 Year

Year 1261 (MCCLXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1266 Year

Year 1266 (MCCLXVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Fifth Crusade Crusade from 1217 to 1221 that attempted to recapture Jerusalem through Egypt

The Fifth Crusade (1217–1221) was an attempt by Western Europeans to reacquire Jerusalem and the rest of the Holy Land by first conquering the powerful Ayyubid state in Egypt.

Arghun Khan

Arghun Khan a.k.a. Argon was the fourth ruler of the Mongol empire's Ilkhanate, from 1284 to 1291. He was the son of Abaqa Khan, and like his father, was a devout Buddhist. He was known for sending several embassies to Europe in an unsuccessful attempt to form a Franco-Mongol alliance against the Muslims in the Holy Land. It was also Arghun who requested a new bride from his great-uncle Kublai Khan. The mission to escort the young Kökötchin across Asia to Arghun was reportedly taken by Marco Polo. Arghun died before Kökötchin arrived, so she instead married Arghun's son, Ghazan.

References

  1. Zuijderduijn, Jaco (2010). "The emergence of provincial debt in the county of Holland (thirteenth-sixteenth centuries)". European Review of Economic History. 14 (2).