1224

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1224 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1224
MCCXXIV
Ab urbe condita 1977
Armenian calendar 673
ԹՎ ՈՀԳ
Assyrian calendar 5974
Balinese saka calendar 1145–1146
Bengali calendar 631
Berber calendar 2174
English Regnal year 8  Hen. 3   9  Hen. 3
Buddhist calendar 1768
Burmese calendar 586
Byzantine calendar 6732–6733
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
3920 or 3860
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
3921 or 3861
Coptic calendar 940–941
Discordian calendar 2390
Ethiopian calendar 1216–1217
Hebrew calendar 4984–4985
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1280–1281
 - Shaka Samvat 1145–1146
 - Kali Yuga 4324–4325
Holocene calendar 11224
Igbo calendar 224–225
Iranian calendar 602–603
Islamic calendar 620–621
Japanese calendar Jōō 3 / Gennin 1
(元仁元年)
Javanese calendar 1132–1133
Julian calendar 1224
MCCXXIV
Korean calendar 3557
Minguo calendar 688 before ROC
民前688年
Nanakshahi calendar −244
Thai solar calendar 1766–1767
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1350 or 969 or 197
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1351 or 970 or 198

Year 1224 ( MCCXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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  • The University of Naples is founded.

Religion

  • September 14 (approximate date) St. Francis of Assisi, while praying on the mountain of Verna during a 40-day fast, has a vision, as a result of which he receives the stigmata. Brother Leo, who is with Francis at the time, leaves a clear and simple account of the event, the first definite account of the phenomenon of stigmata. [2]

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Related Research Articles

Year 1232 (MCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1228 (MCCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The 1210s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1210, and ended on December 31, 1219.

The 1220s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1220, and ended on December 31, 1229.

The 1230s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1230, and ended on December 31, 1239.

The 1240s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1240, and ended on December 31, 1249.

Year 1273 (MCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1217 (MCCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1219 (MCCXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1210 (MCCX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1206 (MCCVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1031 Calendar year

Year 1031 (MXXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1230 (MCCXXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1236 (MCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1246 (MCCXLVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Al-Andalus The territories of the Iberian Peninsula under Moorish rule between 711 and 1492

Al-Andalus was the name given by the Muslims during the Middle Ages to the Iberian Peninsula. At its greatest geographical extent, their territory occupied most of the peninsula and a part of present-day southern France, Septimania, and for nearly a century extended its control from Fraxinet over the Alpine passes which connect Italy with Western Europe. The name more specifically describes the different Arab or Berber states that controlled these territories at various times between 711 and 1492, though the boundaries changed constantly as the Christian Reconquista progressed, eventually shrinking to the south and finally to the vassalage of the Emirate of Granada.

Nasrid dynasty Moorish dynasty

The Nasrid dynasty was the last Muslim dynasty in the Iberian Peninsula, ruling the Emirate of Granada from 1230 until 1492. The Nasrid dynasty rose to power after the defeat of the Almohad Caliphate in 1212 at the Battle of Las Navas de Tolosa. Twenty-three emirs ruled Granada from the founding of the dynasty in 1230 by Muhammad I until 2 January 1492, when Muhammad XII surrendered all lands to Queen Isabella I of Castile. Today, the most visible evidence of the Nasrid dynasty is part of the Alhambra palace complex built under their rule.

Muhammad II was the second Nasrid ruler of the Emirate of Granada in Al-Andalus on the Iberian Peninsula, succeeding his father, Muhammad I. Already experienced in matters of state when he ascended the throne, he continued his father's policy of maintaining independence in the face of Granada's larger neighbours, the Christian kingdom of Castile and the Muslim Marinid state of Morocco, as well as an internal rebellion by his family's former allies, the Banu Ashqilula.

Taifa of Zaragoza Taifa kingdom

The taifa of Zaragoza was an independent Arab Muslim state in Moorish Al-Andalus, present day eastern Spain, which was established in 1018 as one of the taifa kingdoms, with its capital in the Islamic Saraqusta (Zaragoza) city. Zaragoza's taifa emerged in the 11th century following the destruction of the Caliphate of Córdoba in the Moorish Iberian Peninsula.

Taifa of Niebla Medieval emirate in Portugal and Spain

The Taifa of Niebla was an Arab taifa kingdom that existed during three distinct time periods: from 1023 to 1053, from 1145 to 1150 and from 1234 to 1262.

References

  1. Linehan, Peter (1999). "Chapter 21: Castile, Portugal and Navarre". In Abulafia, David (ed.). The New Cambridge Medieval History c.1198-c.1300. Cambridge University Press. pp. 668–699 [672]. ISBN   0-521-36289-X.
  2. Robinson, Paschal (1909). "St. Francis of Assisi". The Catholic Encyclopedia . VI. New York: Robert Appleton Company. Retrieved January 21, 2008.