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July 1 is the 182nd day of the year(183rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 183 days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

It is the last day of the first half of the year. The end of this day marks the halfway point of a leap year. It also falls on the same day of the week as New Year's Day in a leap year. The midpoint of the year for southern hemisphere DST countries occurs at 11:00 p.m.

New Years Day Holiday

New Year's Day, also simply called New Year or New Year's, is observed on January 1, the first day of the year on the modern Gregorian calendar as well as the Julian calendar.

Events

AD 69 (LXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Rufinus. The denomination AD 69 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Tiberius Julius Alexander was an equestrian governor and general in the Roman Empire. Born into a wealthy Jewish family of Alexandria but abandoning or neglecting the Jewish religion, he rose to become procurator of Judea under Claudius. While Prefect of Egypt (66–69), he employed his legions against the Alexandrian Jews in a brutal response to ethnic violence, and was instrumental in the Emperor Vespasian's rise to power. In 70, he participated in the Siege of Jerusalem as Titus' second-in-command.

A Roman legion(romanum legio) was a large unit of the Roman army.

Births

Year 1311 (MCCCXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Liu Bowen Chinese philosopher and military personnel/politician

Liu Ji, courtesy name Bowen, better known as Liu Bowen, was a Chinese military strategist, philosopher, statesman and poet who lived in the late Yuan and early Ming dynasties. He was born in Qingtian County. He served as a key advisor to Zhu Yuanzhang, the founder of the Ming dynasty, in the latter's struggle to overthrow the Yuan dynasty and unify China under his rule. Liu is also known for his prophecies and has been described as the "Divine Chinese Nostradamus". He and Jiao Yu co-edited the military treatise known as the Huolongjing.

Year 1464 (MCDLXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once.

Deaths

552 Year

Year 552 (DLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 552 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Totila King of the Ostrogoths

Totila, original name Baduila, was the penultimate King of the Ostrogoths, reigning from 541 to 552 AD. A skilled military and political leader, Totila reversed the tide of the Gothic War, recovering by 543 almost all the territories in Italy that the Eastern Roman Empire had captured from his Kingdom in 540.

992 Year

Year 992 (CMXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Holidays and observances

Aaron Biblical and Quranic character

Aaron was a prophet, high priest, and the brother of Moses in the Abrahamic religions. Knowledge of Aaron, along with his brother Moses, comes exclusively from religious texts, such as the Bible and Quran.

Syriac Christianity

Syriac Christianity is the form of Eastern Christianity whose formative theological writings and traditional liturgy are expressed in the Syriac language.

Beatification recognition accorded by the Catholic Church of a dead person

Beatification is a recognition accorded by the Catholic Church of a dead person's entrance into Heaven and capacity to intercede on behalf of individuals who pray in his or her name. Beati is the plural form, referring to those who have undergone the process of beatification.

Related Research Articles

August 1 is the 213th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 152 days remain until the end of the year.

August 8 is the 220th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 145 days remain until the end of the year.

June 1 is the 152nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 213 days remain until the end of the year.

January 12 is the 12th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 353 days remain until the end of the year.

March 15 is the 74th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 291 days remain until the end of the year.

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 231 days remain until the end of the year.

March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 285 days remain until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 39 days remain until the end of the year.

November 8 is the 312th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 53 days remain until the end of the year.

November 15 is the 319th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 46 days remain until the end of the year.

November 17 is the 321st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 44 days remain until the end of the year.

October 1 is the 274th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 91 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 31 is the 304th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 61 days remain until the end of the year.

October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 84 days remain until the end of the year.

October 15 is the 288th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 77 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 12 is the 255th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 110 days remain until the end of the year.

September 15 is the 258th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 107 days remain until the end of the year.

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