December 24

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December 24 is the 358th day of the year(359th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar.Seven days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing an additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

502 Year

Year 502 (DII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Avienus and Probus. The denomination 502 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Emperor Wu of Liang Liang Dynasty emperor

Emperor Wu of Liang (梁武帝) (464–549), personal name Xiao Yan (蕭衍), courtesy name Shuda (叔達), nickname Lian'er (練兒), was the founding emperor of the Liang Dynasty of Chinese history. His reign, until the end, was one of the most stable and prosperous during the Southern Dynasties. He came from the same family that ruled Southern Qi, but from a different branch.

Xiao Tong Liang Dynasty imperial prince

Xiao Tong, courtesy name Deshi (德施), formally Crown Prince Zhaoming, was a Crown Prince of the Chinese Liang Dynasty, posthumously honored as Emperor Zhaoming (昭明皇帝). He was the oldest son of Emperor Wu of Liang, whom he predeceased. Xiao Tong's enduring legacy is the literary compendium Wen Xuan.

Births

Year 3 BC was a common year starting on Wednesday or Thursday of the Julian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Lentulus and Messalla. The denomination 3 BC for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Galba Sixth Roman Emperor

Servius Sulpicius Galba was Roman emperor from 68 to 69, the first emperor in the Year of the Four Emperors. He was known as Lucius Livius Galba Ocella prior to taking the throne as a result of his adoption by his stepmother, Livia Ocellina. The governor of Hispania at the time of the rebellion of Gaius Julius Vindex in Gaul, he seized the throne following Nero's suicide.

1166 (MCLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

AD 36 (XXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Allenius and Plautius. The denomination AD 36 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Gongsun Shu was a governor and warlord of the Xin dynasty and early Eastern Han dynasty who controlled the region of modern-day Sichuan, proclaiming himself as the Emperor of Chengjia in 25 AD. With Chengdu as his capital, he ruled for 12 years before dying in battle on 24 December, 36 AD. His empire surrendered to Eastern Han forces the next day.

Chengjia, also called the Cheng dynasty or Great Cheng, was a self-proclaimed empire established by Gongsun Shu in 25 AD after the collapse of the Xin dynasty of Chinese history, rivalling the Eastern Han dynasty founded by Emperor Guangwu later in the same year. Based in the Sichuan Basin with its capital at Chengdu, Chengjia covered a large area including modern Sichuan, Chongqing, Guizhou, Yunnan, and southern Shaanxi, and comprised about 7% of China's population at the time. Chengjia was the most dangerous rival to the Eastern Han, and was the last separatist regime in China to be conquered by the latter, in 36 AD.

Holidays and observances

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Adela and Irmina refers to two sisters and princesses, Adela of Pfalzel and Irmina of Oeren, who are jointly venerated on 24 December.

Paola Elisabetta Cerioli, born Costanza Cerioli Buzecchi-Tasis, was an Italian Roman Catholic widow and the founder of both the Institute of Sisters of the Holy Family and the congregation of the Family of Bergamo.

Related Research Articles

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 269 days remain until the end of the year.

April 16 is the 106th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 259 days remain until the end of the year.

April 13 is the 103rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 262 days remain until the end of the year.

April 7 is the 97th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 268 days remain until the end of the year.

December 5 is the 339th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 26 days remain until the end of the year.

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 174 days remain until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 193 days remain until the end of the year.

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 302 days remain until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 39 days remain until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 56 days remain until the end of the year.

November 7 is the 311th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 54 days remain until the end of the year.

November 15 is the 319th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 46 days remain until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

October 1 is the 274th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 91 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

October 18 is the 291st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 74 days remain until the end of the year.

October 16 is the 289th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 76 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 25 is the 268th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 97 days remain until the end of the year.

References

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  2. Richard Thomson (1829). An Historical Essay on the Magna Charta of King John: To which are Added, the Great Charter in Latin and English; the Charters of Liberties and Confirmations, Granted by Henry III. and Edward I.; the Original Charter of the Forests; and Various Authentic Instruments Connected with Them: Explanatory Notes on Their Several Privileges; a Descriptive Account of the Principal Originals and Editions Extant, Both in Print and Manuscript; and Other Illustrations, Derived from the Most Interesting and Authentic Sources. J. Major. p. 461.
  3. Michael Jones (1 July 1988). Creation of Brittany. A&C Black. p. 163. ISBN   978-0-8264-3450-0.
  4. Journal of the American Musicological Society. American Musicological Society. 1970.
  5. Tyll Eulenspiegel (1860). The marvellous adventures and rare conceits of master Tyll Owlglass, newly collected, chronicled and set forth, in our Engl. tongue, by K.R.H. Mackenzie. p. 244.
  6. Philip M. J. McNair (1967). Peter Martyr in Italy: An Anatomy of Apostasy. Clarendon Press.
  7. "Mariano Salas" (in Spanish). Busca Biografias. Retrieved May 27, 2019.