1524

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1524 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1524
MDXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2277
Armenian calendar 973
ԹՎ ՋՀԳ
Assyrian calendar 6274
Balinese saka calendar 1445–1446
Bengali calendar 931
Berber calendar 2474
English Regnal year 15  Hen. 8   16  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2068
Burmese calendar 886
Byzantine calendar 7032–7033
Chinese calendar 癸未(Water  Goat)
4220 or 4160
     to 
甲申年 (Wood  Monkey)
4221 or 4161
Coptic calendar 1240–1241
Discordian calendar 2690
Ethiopian calendar 1516–1517
Hebrew calendar 5284–5285
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1580–1581
 - Shaka Samvat 1445–1446
 - Kali Yuga 4624–4625
Holocene calendar 11524
Igbo calendar 524–525
Iranian calendar 902–903
Islamic calendar 930–931
Japanese calendar Daiei 4
(大永4年)
Javanese calendar 1442–1443
Julian calendar 1524
MDXXIV
Korean calendar 3857
Minguo calendar 388 before ROC
民前388年
Nanakshahi calendar 56
Thai solar calendar 2066–2067
Tibetan calendar 阴水羊年
(female Water-Goat)
1650 or 1269 or 497
     to 
阳木猴年
(male Wood-Monkey)
1651 or 1270 or 498
Voyage of Verrazzano. Wpdms verrazano voyage map 2.jpg
Voyage of Verrazzano.

Year 1524 ( MDXXIV ) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB, such as the years 1808, 1836, 1864, 1892, 1904, 1932, 1960, 1988, 2016, 2044, 2072, and 2112 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in May. Common years starting on Saturday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 348 days remain until the end of the year.

Republic of Florence City-state on the Apennine Peninsula between 1115 and 1532

The Republic of Florence, also known as the Florentine Republic, was a medieval and early modern state that was centered on the Italian city of Florence in Tuscany. The republic originated in 1115, when the Florentine people rebelled against the Margraviate of Tuscany upon the death of Matilda of Tuscany, a woman who controlled vast territories that included Florence. The Florentines formed a commune in her successors' place. The republic was ruled by a council known as the Signoria of Florence. The signoria was chosen by the gonfaloniere, who was elected every two months by Florentine guild members.

Giovanni da Verrazzano Italian explorer of North America for France

Giovanni da Verrazzano was an Italian explorer of North America, in the service of King Francis I of France.

JulyDecember

Paracelsus Swiss physician and alchemist

Paracelsus, born Theophrastus von Hohenheim, was a Swiss physician, alchemist, and astrologer of the German Renaissance.

Salzburg City in Austria

Salzburg, literally "salt castle", is the fourth-largest city in Austria and the capital of Federal State of Salzburg.

Villach Place in Carinthia, Austria

Villach is the seventh-largest city in Austria and the second-largest in the federal state of Carinthia. It represents an important traffic junction for southern Austria and the whole Alpe-Adria region. As of January 2018, the population is 61,887.

Dalecarlian rebellions

The Dalecarlian rebellions were a series of Swedish rebellions which took place in Dalarna in Sweden: the First Dalecarlian Rebellion in 1524-1525, the Second Dalecarlian Rebellion in 1527–1528, and the Third Dalecarlian Rebellion in 1531–1533. The rebellions were conducted by the peasantry of Dalarna against the Swedish monarch, king Gustav Vasa. Mutual reasons for all three rebellions were loss of support of Gustav I among the Dalecarlian peasantry because of the economic crisis, the increased royal power and the unpopular Swedish Reformation.

Births

Elizabeth of Denmark, Duchess of Mecklenburg Gustrow Schlossmuseum - Elisabeth von Danemark.jpg
Elizabeth of Denmark, Duchess of Mecklenburg

February 10 is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 324 days remain until the end of the year.

Albrecht Giese was a councilman and diplomat of the city of Gdańsk (Danzig). He was a member of the Hanseatic League, and part of an important merchant family who had offices in London and Danzig.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

Deaths

Ismail I Shah Ismail I.jpg
Ismail I
Camilla Battista da Varano Camillavarano.jpg
Camilla Battista da Varano
Diego Velazquez de Cuellar DiegoVelazquezCuellar.jpg
Diego Velazquez de Cuellar
Vasco da Gama Lisboa-Museu Nacional de Arte Antiga-Retrato dito de Vasco da Gama-20140917.jpg
Vasco da Gama

Related Research Articles

1608 Year

1608 (MDCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1608th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 608th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1608, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1564 Year

Year 1564 (MDLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1451 (MCDLI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1543 Year

Year 1543 (MDXLIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. It is one of the years sometimes referred to as an "Annus mirabilis" because of its significant publications in science, considered the start of the scientific revolution.

1522 Year

Year 1522 (MDXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1521 Year

Year 1521 (MDXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1506 Year

Year 1506 (MDVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1519 Year

Year 1519 (MDXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1528 Year

Year 1528 (MDXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1527 Year

Year 1527 (MDXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1517 Year

Year 1517 (MDXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1516 Year

Year 1516 (MDXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1515 Year

Year 1515 (MDXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1510 Year

Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1508 Year

Year 1508 (MDVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1468 (MCDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Paine, Lincoln P. (2000). Ships of Discovery and Exploration. New York: Houghton Mifflin Harcourt. p. 37. ISBN   0-395-98415-7.
  2. Grun, Bernard (1991). The Timetables of History (3rd ed.). New York: Simon & Schuster. p. 235. ISBN   0-671-74919-6.