1564

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1564 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1564
MDLXIV
Ab urbe condita 2317
Armenian calendar 1013
ԹՎ ՌԺԳ
Assyrian calendar 6314
Balinese saka calendar 1485–1486
Bengali calendar 971
Berber calendar 2514
English Regnal year 6  Eliz. 1   7  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2108
Burmese calendar 926
Byzantine calendar 7072–7073
Chinese calendar 癸亥(Water  Pig)
4260 or 4200
     to 
甲子年 (Wood  Rat)
4261 or 4201
Coptic calendar 1280–1281
Discordian calendar 2730
Ethiopian calendar 1556–1557
Hebrew calendar 5324–5325
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1620–1621
 - Shaka Samvat 1485–1486
 - Kali Yuga 4664–4665
Holocene calendar 11564
Igbo calendar 564–565
Iranian calendar 942–943
Islamic calendar 971–972
Japanese calendar Eiroku 7
(永禄7年)
Javanese calendar 1483–1484
Julian calendar 1564
MDLXIV
Korean calendar 3897
Minguo calendar 348 before ROC
民前348年
Nanakshahi calendar 96
Thai solar calendar 2106–2107
Tibetan calendar 阴水猪年
(female Water-Pig)
1690 or 1309 or 537
     to 
阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1691 or 1310 or 538
September 10: Battle of Kawanakajima BattleKawanakajima.jpg
September 10: Battle of Kawanakajima

Year 1564 ( MDLXIV ) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A leap year starting on Saturday is any year with 366 days that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are BA, such as the years 1916, 1944, 1972, 2000, and 2028 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2012 and 2040 in the obsolete Julian calendar. In the Gregorian calendar all centennial leap years start on Saturday; the next such year will be 2400, see below for more.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

January 26 is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 339 days remaining until the end of the year.

Livonian War 16th century war in Eastern Europe

The Livonian War (1558–1583) was fought for control of Old Livonia, when the Tsardom of Russia faced a varying coalition of Denmark–Norway, the Kingdom of Sweden, and the Union of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Kingdom of Poland.

The Battle of Ula or Battle of Chashniki was fought during the Livonian War on 26 January 1564 between the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Tsardom of Russia on the Ula River north of Chashniki in the Vitebsk Region. The Russian troops, unarmed and moving in a loose formation, were taken by complete surprise and defeated, losing their large wagon train.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

English people Nation and ethnic group native to England

The English people are a nation and an ethnic group native to England who speak the English language. The English identity is of early medieval origin, when they were known in Old English as the Angelcynn. Their ethnonym is derived from the Angles, one of the Germanic peoples who migrated to Great Britain around the 5th century AD. England is one of the countries of the United Kingdom, and the majority of people living there are British citizens.

Anthony Jenkinson English diplomat

Anthony Jenkinson was born at Market Harborough, Leicestershire. He was one of the first Englishmen to explore Muscovy and present day Russia. Jenkinson was a traveller and explorer on behalf of the Muscovy Company and the English crown. He also met Ivan the Terrible several times during his trips to Moscow and Russia. He detailed the accounts of his travel through several written works over his life.

Date unknown

Idris Alooma, Idris ibn 'Ali (Alooma), or Idriss Alaoma, was Mai (king) of the Kanem-Bornu Empire, located mainly in Chad, Cameroon, Niger and Nigeria. His name is more properly written Idris Alawma or Idris Alauma. An outstanding statesman, under his rule Kanem-Bornu touched the zenith of its power. Idris is remembered for his military skills, administrative reforms and Islamic piety. His feats are mainly known through his chronicler Ahmad bin Fartuwa.

Births

Galileo Galilei Justus Sustermans - Portrait of Galileo Galilei, 1636.jpg
Galileo Galilei
William Shakespeare Shakespeare.jpg
William Shakespeare

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Šurhaci, was a Jurchen leader, a member of the Aisin Gioro clan, he was a younger brother of Nurhaci, the founder of the Later Jin dynasty, of what would become the Qing dynasty. Under the Ming dynasty government, he held the title of local chieftain (都指揮) in the Jianzhou district, and maintained relations with the Ming authorities up to the beginning of 1607. In that year, he joined Nurhaci in the campaign against Bujantai and the Ula tribe, receiving the title of darhan baturu. However, as a result of disargreements with his brother over the conquest of the Hoifa and the killing of Hoifa's beile Baindari in 1607, he was put to death four years later at Nurhaci's order and buried in Dongjingling Township, Liaoyang. In 1653, he was posthumously given the rank of qinwang under the posthumous title Prince Zhuang of the First Rank.

1611 Year

1611 (MDCXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1611th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 611th year of the 2nd millennium, the 11th year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1611, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Michelangelo Miguel Angel, por Daniele da Volterra (detalle).jpg
Michelangelo
John Calvin MCC-31320 Portret van Johannes Calvijn (1509-1564)-uitsnede.jpg
John Calvin
Rani Durgavati Rani Durgavati.jpg
Rani Durgavati
Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor Hans Bocksberger der Aeltere 001.jpg
Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor
Luis de Velasco LuisdeVelascoI.jpg
Luis de Velasco
Guido Ascanio Sforza di Santa Fiora Guido Ascanio Sforza di Santa Fiora.jpg
Guido Ascanio Sforza di Santa Fiora

Related Research Articles

1572 Year

Year 1572 (MDLXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1573 Year

Year 1573 (MDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1582 Year

1582 (MDLXXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1582nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 582nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1582, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which had previously been the universally accepted calendar in Christian nations. However, this year saw the beginning of the Gregorian Calendar switch, when the Papal bull known as Inter gravissimas introduced the Gregorian calendar, adopted by Spain, Portugal, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and most of present-day Italy from the start. In these countries, the year continued as normal until Thursday, October 4. However, the next day became Friday, October 15, in those countries. Other countries continued using the Julian calendar for decades or, in some cases, centuries. The complete conversion of the Gregorian calendar was not entirely done until 1923. In the Proleptic Gregorian calendar, 1582 is a common year starting on Friday.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1595th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 595th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1546 Year

Year 1546 (MDXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1540 Year

Year 1540 (MDXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1639 Year

1639 (MDCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1639th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 639th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1639, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1565 (MDLXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1591st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 591st year of the 2nd millennium, the 91st year of the 16th century, and the 2nd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1589 Year

1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1589th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 589th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1570 Year

Year 1570 (MDLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1679 Year

1679 (MDCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1679th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 679th year of the 2nd millennium, the 79th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1679, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1532 Year

Year 1532 (MDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1510 Year

Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Hart, Martin (1982) [c. 1973]. Rats. Allison & Busby. p. 66. ISBN   0-85031-297-3.