1514

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1514 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1514
MDXIV
Ab urbe condita 2267
Armenian calendar 963
ԹՎ ՋԿԳ
Assyrian calendar 6264
Balinese saka calendar 1435–1436
Bengali calendar 921
Berber calendar 2464
English Regnal year 5  Hen. 8   6  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2058
Burmese calendar 876
Byzantine calendar 7022–7023
Chinese calendar 癸酉(Water  Rooster)
4210 or 4150
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
4211 or 4151
Coptic calendar 1230–1231
Discordian calendar 2680
Ethiopian calendar 1506–1507
Hebrew calendar 5274–5275
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1570–1571
 - Shaka Samvat 1435–1436
 - Kali Yuga 4614–4615
Holocene calendar 11514
Igbo calendar 514–515
Iranian calendar 892–893
Islamic calendar 919–920
Japanese calendar Eishō 11
(永正11年)
Javanese calendar 1431–1432
Julian calendar 1514
MDXIV
Korean calendar 3847
Minguo calendar 398 before ROC
民前398年
Nanakshahi calendar 46
Thai solar calendar 2056–2057
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1640 or 1259 or 487
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1641 or 1260 or 488
September 8: Battle of Orsha. Autor nieznany (malarz z kregu Lukasa Cranacha Starszego), Bitwa pod Orsza.jpg
September 8: Battle of Orsha.

Year 1514 ( MDXIV ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

Albrecht Durer creates engraving Melencolia I. Albrecht Durer - Melencolia I - Google Art Project ( AGDdr3EHmNGyA).jpg
Albrecht Dürer creates engraving Melencolia I.

JanuaryJune

January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 355 days remaining until the end of the year.

Rialto human settlement in Italy

The Rialto is a central area of Venice, Italy, in the sestiere of San Polo. It is and has been for many centuries the financial and commercial heart of the city. Rialto is known for its prominent markets as well as for the monumental Rialto Bridge across the Grand Canal.

Venice Comune in Veneto, Italy

Venice is a city in northeastern Italy and the capital of the Veneto region.

JulyDecember

August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 146 days remaining until the end of the year.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Kingdom of France kingdom in Western Europe from 843 to 1791

The Kingdom of France was a medieval and early modern monarchy in Western Europe. It was one of the most powerful states in Europe and a great power since the Late Middle Ages and the Hundred Years' War. It was also an early colonial power, with possessions around the world.

Date unknown

Albrecht Dürer German Renaissance artist

Albrecht Dürer sometimes spelt in English as Durer or Duerer, without umlaut, was a painter, printmaker, and theorist of the German Renaissance. Born in Nuremberg, Dürer established his reputation and influence across Europe when he was still in his twenties due to his high-quality woodcut prints. He was in communication with the major Italian artists of his time, including Raphael, Giovanni Bellini and Leonardo da Vinci, and from 1512 he was patronized by Emperor Maximilian I. Dürer is commemorated by both the Lutheran and Episcopal Churches.

Engraving practice of incising a design on to a hard, usually flat surface, by cutting grooves into it

Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting grooves into it with a burin. The result may be a decorated object in itself, as when silver, gold, steel, or glass are engraved, or may provide an intaglio printing plate, of copper or another metal, for printing images on paper as prints or illustrations; these images are also called "engravings". Engraving is one of the oldest and most important techniques in printmaking. Wood engraving is a form of relief printing and is not covered in this article.

<i>Melencolia I</i> 1514 engraving by Albrecht Dürer

Melencolia I is a 1514 engraving by the German Renaissance artist Albrecht Dürer. The print's central subject is an enigmatic and gloomy female figure thought to personify melancholia. Holding her head in her hand, she stares past the busy scene in front of her. The area is strewn with symbols and tools associated with craft and carpentry, including an hourglass, weighing scales, a hand plane and a saw. Other objects relate to alchemy, geometry or numerology. Behind the figure is a structure with a magic square embedded in it and a ladder leading beyond the frame. The sky contains a rainbow, a comet or planet, and a bat-like creature bearing the text that has become the print's title.

Births

Andreas Vesalius Vesalius Portrait pg xii - c.png
Andreas Vesalius

George Gordon, 4th Earl of Huntly was a Scottish nobleman.

1562 Year

Year 1562 (MDLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

January 23 is the 23rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 342 days remaining until the end of the year.

Deaths

Donato Bramante Donato Bramante.jpg
Donato Bramante

Related Research Articles

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1652 (MDCLII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1652nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 652nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 52nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1650s decade. As of the start of 1652, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1522 Year

Year 1522 (MDXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1571 Year

Year 1571 (MDLXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1619 Year

1619 (MDCXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1619th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 619th year of the 2nd millennium, the 19th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1619, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1540 Year

Year 1540 (MDXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1537 Year

Year 1537 (MDXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1578 Year

Year 1578 (MDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1533 Year

Year 1533 (MDXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1515 Year

Year 1515 (MDXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1513 Year

Year 1513 (MDXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1511 Year

Year 1511 (MDXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1510 Year

Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1508 Year

Year 1508 (MDVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Year

Year 1509 (MDIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Events from the 1510s in England.

Events from the 1520s in England.

References

  1. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 139–142. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.
  2. Paine, Lincoln P. (1997). Ships of the World: an Historical Encyclopedia. Houghton Mifflin. ISBN   0-85177-739-2.
  3. "Hornshole Battle Site". Discover the Borders. Retrieved 2013-08-06.
  4. 1 2 Williams, Hywel (2005). Cassell's Chronology of World History. London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson. pp. 197–204. ISBN   0-304-35730-8.