1565

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1565 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1565
MDLXV
Ab urbe condita 2318
Armenian calendar 1014
ԹՎ ՌԺԴ
Assyrian calendar 6315
Balinese saka calendar 1486–1487
Bengali calendar 972
Berber calendar 2515
English Regnal year 7  Eliz. 1   8  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2109
Burmese calendar 927
Byzantine calendar 7073–7074
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
4261 or 4201
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4262 or 4202
Coptic calendar 1281–1282
Discordian calendar 2731
Ethiopian calendar 1557–1558
Hebrew calendar 5325–5326
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1621–1622
 - Shaka Samvat 1486–1487
 - Kali Yuga 4665–4666
Holocene calendar 11565
Igbo calendar 565–566
Iranian calendar 943–944
Islamic calendar 972–973
Japanese calendar Eiroku 8
(永禄8年)
Javanese calendar 1484–1485
Julian calendar 1565
MDLXV
Korean calendar 3898
Minguo calendar 347 before ROC
民前347年
Nanakshahi calendar 97
Thai solar calendar 2107–2108
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1691 or 1310 or 538
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1692 or 1311 or 539

Year 1565 ( MDLXV ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

March 1: Founding of Rio de Janeiro. Palacio Pedro Ernesto - Fundacao da Cidade.jpg
March 1: Founding of Rio de Janeiro.

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

Tsardom of Russia former country  (1547-1721)

The Tsardom of Russia, or the Tsardom of Muscovy, was the centralized Russian state from the assumption of the title of Tsar by Ivan IV in 1547 until the foundation of the Russian Empire by Peter the Great in 1721.

Oprichnina

The oprichnina was a state policy implemented by Tsar Ivan the Terrible in Russia between 1565 and 1572. The policy included mass repression of the boyars, including public executions and confiscation of their land and property. In this context it can also refer to:

JulyDecember

July 29 is the 210th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 155 days remaining until the end of the year.

Mary, Queen of Scots 16th-century Scottish ruler and queen consort of France

Mary, Queen of Scots, also known as Mary Stuart or Mary I of Scotland, reigned over Scotland from 14 December 1542 to 24 July 1567.

Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley husband of Mary, Queen of Scots

Henry Stuart, Duke of Albany, styled as Lord Darnley until 1565, was king consort of Scotland from 1565 until his murder at Kirk o' Field in 1567. Many contemporary narratives describing his life and death refer to him as Lord Darnley, his title as heir apparent to the Earldom of Lennox, and it is by this appellation that he is now generally known.

Date unknown

Pencil Writing implement

A pencil is an implement for writing or drawing, constructed of a narrow, solid pigment core in a protective casing that prevents the core from being broken and/or marking the user’s hand.

John Beddoes School

John Beddoes School was a secondary or comprehensive school for boys and girls. The school was based on one site in the town of Presteigne.

Presteigne village and community in Powys, Wales

Presteigne is a town and community in Radnorshire, Powys, Wales. It was the county town of the historic county of Radnorshire. Despite lying on a minor B road the town has, in common with several other towns close to the Wales-England border, assumed the motto, "Gateway to Wales".

Births

Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger.jpg
Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 348 days remaining until the end of the year.

Mariana Navarro de Guevarra Romero Spanish religious

Blessed Mariana Navarro de Guevarra Romero was a Spanish Roman Catholic nun who became a member of the Mercedarian Tertiaries. Upon admittance she took the name of Mariana of Jesus. She was noted for a life of penance and the emphasis of devotion to the Eucharist.

1624 Year

1624 (MDCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1624th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 624th year of the 2nd millennium, the 24th year of the 17th century, and the 5th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1624, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Diego Lainez Diego Lainez.jpg
Diego Lainez
Pope Pius IV Ritratto di Pio IV.jpg
Pope Pius IV

Related Research Articles

1707 Year

1707 (MDCCVII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1707th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 707th year of the 2nd millennium, the 7th year of the 18th century, and the 8th year of the 1700s decade. As of the start of 1707, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. In the Swedish calendar it was a common year starting on Tuesday, one day ahead of the Julian and ten days behind the Gregorian calendar.

1573 Year

Year 1573 (MDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1582 Year

1582 (MDLXXXII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1582nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 582nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 82nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1582, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which had previously been the universally accepted calendar in Christian nations. However, this year saw the beginning of the Gregorian Calendar switch, when the Papal bull known as Inter gravissimas introduced the Gregorian calendar, adopted by Spain, Portugal, the Polish–Lithuanian Commonwealth and most of present-day Italy from the start. In these countries, the year continued as normal until Thursday, October 4. However, the next day became Friday, October 15, in those countries. Other countries continued using the Julian calendar for decades or, in some cases, centuries. The complete conversion of the Gregorian calendar was not entirely done until 1923. In the Proleptic Gregorian calendar, 1582 is a common year starting on Friday.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1571 Year

Year 1571 (MDLXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1546 Year

Year 1546 (MDXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1550 Year

Year 1550 (MDL) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1627 Year

1627 (MDCXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1627th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 627th year of the 2nd millennium, the 27th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1627, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1628 Year

1628 (MDCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1628th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 628th year of the 2nd millennium, the 28th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1628, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1587 Year

1587 (MDLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1587th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 587th year of the 2nd millennium, the 87th year of the 16th century, and the 8th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1587, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1584 Year

1584 (MDLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1584th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 584th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1584, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1562 Year

Year 1562 (MDLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1558 Year

Year 1558 (MDLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1551 Year

Year 1551 (MDLI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1530 Year

Year 1530 (MDXXX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

The year 1565 in science and technology included many events, some of which are listed here.

Giovan Giacomo Paleari Fratino (1520–1586), known as El Fratin or Il Fratino, was a military engineer who served the Spanish Emperor Charles V, and then his son Philip II of Spain. He is known for having designed the first Martello tower as well as many other fortifications.

References

  1. Vigano, Marino (2001). "Giovan Giacomo Paleari Fratino and the Tower at Mortella Point, Corsica (1563)". Fort. Fortress Study Group. 29: 41–57.