1493

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1493 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1493
MCDXCIII
Ab urbe condita 2246
Armenian calendar 942
ԹՎ ՋԽԲ
Assyrian calendar 6243
Balinese saka calendar 1414–1415
Bengali calendar 900
Berber calendar 2443
English Regnal year 8  Hen. 7   9  Hen. 7
Buddhist calendar 2037
Burmese calendar 855
Byzantine calendar 7001–7002
Chinese calendar 壬子(Water  Rat)
4189 or 4129
     to 
癸丑年 (Water  Ox)
4190 or 4130
Coptic calendar 1209–1210
Discordian calendar 2659
Ethiopian calendar 1485–1486
Hebrew calendar 5253–5254
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1549–1550
 - Shaka Samvat 1414–1415
 - Kali Yuga 4593–4594
Holocene calendar 11493
Igbo calendar 493–494
Iranian calendar 871–872
Islamic calendar 898–899
Japanese calendar Meiō 2
(明応2年)
Javanese calendar 1410–1411
Julian calendar 1493
MCDXCIII
Korean calendar 3826
Minguo calendar 419 before ROC
民前419年
Nanakshahi calendar 25
Thai solar calendar 2035–2036
Tibetan calendar 阳水鼠年
(male Water-Rat)
1619 or 1238 or 466
     to 
阴水牛年
(female Water-Ox)
1620 or 1239 or 467

Year 1493 ( MCDXCIII ) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 346 days remaining until the end of the year.

Charles VIII of France King of France

Charles VIII, called the Affable, was King of France from 1483 to his death in 1498, the seventh from the House of Valois. He succeeded his father Louis XI at the age of 13. His elder sister Anne of France acted as regent jointly with her husband Peter II, Duke of Bourbon until 1491 when the young king turned 21 years of age. During Anne's regency, the great lords rebelled against royal centralisation efforts in a conflict known as the Mad War (1485–1488), which resulted in a victory for the royal government.

Roussillon Historical province in Pyrénées-Orientales, France

Roussillon is one of the historical counties of the former Principality of Catalonia, corresponding roughly to the present-day southern French département of Pyrénées-Orientales save Fenouillèdes. It may also refer to Northern Catalonia or French Catalonia, the first used by Catalan-speakers and the second used by French-speakers. A 1998 survey found that 34% of respondents stated they speak Catalan, and a further 21% understand it.

Date unknown

Kingdom of England historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

Perkin Warbeck Imposter-pretender to the throne of England

Perkin Warbeck was a pretender to the English throne. Warbeck claimed to be Richard of Shrewsbury, Duke of York, who was the second son of Edward IV and one of the so-called "Princes in the Tower". Richard, if he was alive, would have been the rightful claimant to the throne, assuming that his elder brother Edward V was dead, and he was legitimate – a contentious point.

James IV of Scotland King of Scots

James IV was the King of Scotland from 11 June 1488 to his death. He assumed the throne following the death of his father, King James III, in the Battle of Sauchieburn, a rebellion in which the younger James played an indirect role. He is generally regarded as the most successful of the Stewart monarchs of Scotland, but like his father he died in battle. His reign ended in a disastrous defeat at the Battle of Flodden. He was the last monarch not only from Scotland, but from all of Great Britain, to be killed in battle.

Births

January 2 is the second day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 363 days remaining until the end of the year.

Louis de Bourbon-Vendôme,, son of Francis, Count of Vendôme and Marie of Luxembourg.

1557 Year

Year 1557 (MDLVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

1608 Year

1608 (MDCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1608th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 608th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1608, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1492 (MCDXCII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1490s decade

The 1490s decade ran from January 1, 1490, to December 31, 1499.

1500 Year

Year 1500 (MD) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1575 Year

Year 1575 (MDLXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1544 Year

1544 (MDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1544th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 544th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1540s decade. As of the start of 1544, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

1532 Year

Year 1532 (MDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1527 Year

Year 1527 (MDXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1515 Year

Year 1515 (MDXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1513 Year

Year 1513 (MDXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1508 Year

Year 1508 (MDVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1504 Year

Year 1504 (MDIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1494 (MCDXCIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1450 (MCDL) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Martín Alonso Pinzón Spanish explorer

Martín Alonso Pinzón, was a Spanish mariner, shipbuilder, navigator and explorer, oldest of the Pinzón brothers. He sailed with Christopher Columbus on his first voyage to the New World in 1492, as captain of the Pinta. His youngest brother Vicente Yáñez Pinzón was captain of the Niña, and the middle brother Francisco Martín Pinzón was maestre of the Pinta.

<i>Niña</i> caravel used by Christopher Columbus

La Niña was one of the three Spanish ships used by Italian explorer Christopher Columbus in his first voyage to the West Indies in 1492. As was tradition for Spanish ships of the day, she bore a female saint's name, Santa Clara. However, she was commonly referred to by her nickname, La Niña, which was probably a pun on the name of her owner, Juan Niño of Moguer. She was a standard caravel-type vessel.

<i>Inter caetera</i> papal bull

Inter caetera was a papal bull issued by Pope Alexander VI on the fourth of May 1493, which granted to the Catholic Majesties of Ferdinand and Isabella all lands to the "west and south" of a pole-to-pole line 100 leagues west and south of any of the islands of the Azores or the Cape Verde islands.

Alonso Sánchez Spanish explorer

Alonso Sánchez was a fifteenth-century mariner and merchant born in Huelva, Spain, on Andalusia's Atlantic coast. Legend has it that he was a mariner who reached America several years before Christopher Columbus did.

<i>Decades of the New World</i>

Decades of the New World by Peter Martyr's is a series of letters and reports of the early explorations of Central and South America that was published beginning 1511 and later anthologized. Being among the earliest such reports, Decades are of great value in the history of geography and discovery and describe the early contacts of Europeans and Native Americans derived from the narrative of the voyages of Christopher Columbus in the Caribbean and the reports from Hernán Cortés's Mexican expedition.

References

  1. "Historical Events for Year 1493 | OnThisDay.com". Historyorb.com. Retrieved 2017-04-22.
  2. Williams, Neville (1999). "1493". The Hutchinson Chronology of World History: 1492-1775 - The Expanding World. Abington, UK: Helicon Books. ISBN   978-1-85-986282-7.
  3. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 135–138. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.