January 19

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January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 346 days remain until the end of the year(347 in leap years).

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

Contents

Events

Year 379 (CCCLXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Ausonius and Hermogenianus. The denomination 379 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Gratian Roman emperor

Gratian was Roman emperor from 367 to 383. The eldest son of Valentinian I, Gratian accompanied, during his youth, his father on several campaigns along the Rhine and Danube frontiers. Upon the death of Valentinian in 375, Gratian's brother Valentinian II was declared emperor by his father's soldiers. In 378, Gratian's generals won a decisive victory over the Lentienses, a branch of the Alamanni, at the Battle of Argentovaria. Gratian subsequently led a campaign across the Rhine, the last emperor to do so, and attacked the Lentienses, forcing the tribe to surrender. That same year, his uncle Valens was killed in the Battle of Adrianople against the Goths. He favoured Christianity over traditional Roman religion, refusing the office of Pontifex maximus and removing the Altar of Victory from the Roman Senate.

Theodosius I Roman emperor

Theodosius I, also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire. On accepting his elevation, he campaigned against Goths and other barbarians who had invaded the Empire. His resources were not sufficient to destroy them or drive them out, which had been Roman policy for centuries in dealing with invaders. By treaty, which followed his indecisive victory at the end of the Gothic War, they were established as foederati, autonomous allies of the Empire, south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the Empire's borders. They were given lands and allowed to remain under their own leaders, a grave departure from Roman hegemonic ways. This turn away from traditional policies was accommodationist and had grave consequences for the Western Empire from the beginning of the century, as the Romans found themselves with the impossible task of defending the borders and deal with unruly federates within. Theodosius I was obliged to fight two destructive civil wars, successively defeating the usurpers Magnus Maximus in 387–388 and Eugenius in 394, though not without material cost to the power of the Empire.

Births

398 Year

Year 398 (CCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Augustus and Eutychianus. The denomination 398 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Pulcheria Byzantine empress

Saint Aelia Pulcheria was Regent of the Eastern Roman Empire during the minority of her brother Theodosius II, and empress by marriage to Marcian.

840 Year

Year 840 (DCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

520 Year

Year 520 (DXX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Rusticus and Vitalianus. The denomination 520 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

John II, surnamed Cappadox or the Cappadocian was Patriarch of Constantinople in 518–520, during the reign of Byzantine emperor Anastasius I after an enforced condemnation of the Council of Chalcedon. His short patriarchate is memorable for the celebrated Acclamations of Constantinople, and the reunion of East and West after a schism of 34 years. At the death of Timothy I, John of Cappadocia, whom he had designated his successor, was presbyter and chancellor of the Church of Constantinople.

639 Year

Year 639 (DCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 639 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Holidays and observances

Edgar Allan Poe 19th-century American author, poet, editor and literary critic

Edgar Allan Poe was an American writer, editor, and literary critic. Poe is best known for his poetry and short stories, particularly his tales of mystery and the macabre. He is widely regarded as a central figure of Romanticism in the United States and of American literature as a whole, and he was one of the country's earliest practitioners of the short story. He is generally considered the inventor of the detective fiction genre and is further credited with contributing to the emerging genre of science fiction. He was the first well-known American writer to earn a living through writing alone, resulting in a financially difficult life and career.

Poe Toaster

Poe Toaster is the media sobriquet popularly used to refer to an unidentified person who, for over seven decades, paid an annual tribute to American author Edgar Allan Poe by visiting the cenotaph marking his original grave in Baltimore, Maryland, in the early hours of January 19, Poe's birthday. The shadowy figure, dressed in black with a wide-brimmed hat and white scarf, would pour himself a glass of cognac and raise a toast to Poe's memory, then vanish into the night, leaving three roses in a distinctive arrangement and the unfinished bottle of cognac. Onlookers gathered annually in hopes of glimpsing the elusive Toaster, who did not seek publicity and was rarely seen or photographed.

Baltimore Largest city in Maryland, United States

Baltimore is the most populous city in the U.S. state of Maryland. Baltimore was established by the Constitution of Maryland as an independent city in 1729. With a population of 602,495 in 2018, Baltimore is the largest such independent city in the United States. As of 2017, the population of the Baltimore metropolitan area was estimated to be just under 2.802 million, making it the 21st largest metropolitan area in the country. Baltimore is located about 40 miles (64 km) northeast of Washington, D.C., making it a principal city in the Washington-Baltimore combined statistical area (CSA), the fourth-largest CSA in the nation, with a calculated 2018 population of 9,797,063.

Related Research Articles

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March 5 is the 64th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 301 days remain until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 56 days remain until the end of the year.

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 42 days remain until the end of the year.

November 8 is the 312th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 53 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

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October 15 is the 288th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 77 days remain until the end of the year.

October 16 is the 289th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 76 days remain until the end of the year.

September 21 is the 264th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 101 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

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References

  1. The New Encyclopædia Britannica. Encyclopædia Britannica. 1982. p. 272. ISBN   978-0-85229-387-4.
  2. British Museum. Dept. of Coins and Medals; Taylor Combe; Edward Hawkins (1826). Description of the Anglo-Gallic Coins in the British Museum. Trustees of the British Museum. p. 30.
  3. Mandell Creighton (1887). A History of the Papacy During the Period of the Reformation: The Italian princes. 1464-1518. Longmans, Green. p. 125.
  4. "Team N2i successfully conquer the Pole of Inaccessibility by foot and kite on 19th Jan '07" . Retrieved August 16, 2011.
  5. דהאן כלב, הנרייט, ed. (2011). A-Mythical: Social Justice and Gender in Jewish Sources (in Hebrew). Tel Aviv: MIskal - Yedioth Aharonoth Books and Chemed Books. p. 176. ISBN   978-965-545-252-5 . Retrieved 28 March 2019.
  6. "National Women's Hall of Fame" (PDF).
  7. Don Rittner (2014). A to Z of Scientists in Weather and Climate. Infobase Publishing. p. 159. ISBN   978-1-4381-0924-4.