649

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
649 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 649
DCXLIX
Ab urbe condita 1402
Armenian calendar 98
ԹՎ ՂԸ
Assyrian calendar 5399
Balinese saka calendar 570–571
Bengali calendar 56
Berber calendar 1599
Buddhist calendar 1193
Burmese calendar 11
Byzantine calendar 6157–6158
Chinese calendar 戊申(Earth  Monkey)
3345 or 3285
     to 
己酉年 (Earth  Rooster)
3346 or 3286
Coptic calendar 365–366
Discordian calendar 1815
Ethiopian calendar 641–642
Hebrew calendar 4409–4410
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 705–706
 - Shaka Samvat 570–571
 - Kali Yuga 3749–3750
Holocene calendar 10649
Iranian calendar 27–28
Islamic calendar 28–29
Japanese calendar Taika 5
(大化5年)
Javanese calendar 540–541
Julian calendar 649
DCXLIX
Korean calendar 2982
Minguo calendar 1263 before ROC
民前1263年
Nanakshahi calendar −819
Seleucid era 960/961 AG
Thai solar calendar 1191–1192
Tibetan calendar 阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
775 or 394 or −378
     to 
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
776 or 395 or −377
Pope Martin I (649-655) Pope Martin I Illustration.jpg
Pope Martin I (649–655)

Year 649 ( DCXLIX ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. The denomination 649 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Byzantine Empire

Arab–Byzantine wars series of wars between the 7th and 11th centuries

The Arab–Byzantine wars were a series of wars between the mostly Arab Muslims and the Byzantine Empire between the 7th and 11th centuries AD, started during the initial Muslim conquests under the expansionist Rashidun and Umayyad caliphs in the 7th century and continued by their successors until the mid-11th century.

Cyprus Island country in Mediterranean

Cyprus, officially the Republic of Cyprus, is an island country in the Eastern Mediterranean and the third largest and third most populous island in the Mediterranean, located south of Turkey, west of Syria and Lebanon, northwest of Israel, north of Egypt, and southeast of Greece.

Salamis, Cyprus Historical state on Cyprus and archaeological site

Salamis is an ancient Greek city-state on the east coast of Cyprus, at the mouth of the river Pedieos, 6 km north of modern Famagusta. According to tradition, the founder of Salamis was Teucer, son of Telamon, who could not return home after the Trojan war because he had failed to avenge his brother Ajax.

Europe

January 20 is the 20th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 345 days remaining until the end of the year.

Chindasuinth Visigothic King of Hispania

Chindasuinth (Also spelled Chindaswinth, Chindaswind, Chindasuinto, Chindasvindo, or Khindaswinth was Visigothic King of Hispania, from 642 until his death in 653. He succeeded Tulga, from whom he took the throne in a coup. He was elected by the nobles and anointed by the bishops on April 30th, 642.

Braulio of Zaragoza Bishop of Zaragoza

Saint Braulio or Braulius was bishop of Zaragoza and a learned cleric living in the Kingdom of the Visigoths. He succeeded his brother John in the see where he had previously been archdeacon. He was an advisor and confidante of several Visigoth kings, including Chindasuinth, whose son Recceswinth he recommended be installed as associate king.

Arabian Empire

Muawiyah I Umayyad caliph

Muawiyah I was the founder and first caliph of the Umayyad Caliphate. He was the first who established the Umayyad dynasty in Islam of the caliphate, and was the second caliph from the Umayyad clan, the first being Uthman ibn Affan.

Syria Country in Western Asia

Syria, officially the Syrian Arab Republic, is a country in Western Asia, bordering Lebanon to the southwest, the Mediterranean Sea to the west, Turkey to the north, Iraq to the east, Jordan to the south, and Israel to the southwest. A country of fertile plains, high mountains, and deserts, Syria is home to diverse ethnic and religious groups, including Syrian Arabs, Greeks, Armenians, Assyrians, Kurds, Circassians, Mandeans and Turks. Religious groups include Sunnis, Christians, Alawites, Druze, Isma'ilis, Mandeans, Shiites, Salafis, Yazidis, and Jews. Sunni make up the largest religious group in Syria.

Levant geographic and cultural region consisting of the eastern Mediterranean between Anatolia and Egypt

The Levant is an approximate historical geographical term referring to a large area in the Eastern Mediterranean, primarily in Western Asia. In its narrowest sense, it is equivalent to the historical region of Syria. In its widest historical sense, the Levant included all of the eastern Mediterranean with its islands; that is, it included all of the countries along the Eastern Mediterranean shores, extending from Greece to Cyrenaica.

China

January 19 is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 346 days remaining until the end of the year.

Tang campaign against Kucha Tang dynasty conquest

The Tang campaign against Kucha was a military campaign led by the Tang Dynasty general Ashina She'er against the Tarim Basin oasis state of Kucha in Xinjiang, which was aligned with the Western Turkic Khaganate. The campaign began in 648 and ended on 19 January 649, after the surrender of the Kuchan forces following a forty-day siege in Aksu. Kuchean soldiers tried to recapture the kingdom with the assistance of the Western Turkic Khaganate, but were defeated by the Tang army.

Kucha former country in present-day China

Kucha or Kuche was an ancient Buddhist kingdom located on the branch of the Silk Road that ran along the northern edge of the Taklamakan Desert in the Tarim Basin and south of the Muzat River.

Japan

Emperor Kōtoku was the 36th emperor of Japan, according to the traditional order of succession.

Soga no Kurayamada no Ishikawa no Maro Japanese noble

Soga no Kurayamada no Ishikawa no Maro (蘇我倉山田石川麻呂) was a member of the Soga clan and first holder of the office of udaijin. He was the son of Soga no Kuramaro and grandson of Soga no Umako; his daughter was married to Prince Naka-no-Ōe. After the fall of Soga no Iruka, he was the most senior member of the family. As chronicled in the Nihon Shoki, he was accused of treason and strangled himself at Yamada-dera in 649; his wife and seven of his children also committed suicide; other relatives were captured and executed. The discovery of exonerating documents led to a posthumous pardon and the posting of his slanderer to Tsukushi Province. His death brought the political ascendancy of the Soga clan to an end.

Treason crime that covers some of the more extreme acts against ones sovereign or nation

In law, treason is criminal disloyalty to the state. It is a crime that covers some of the more extreme acts against one's nation or sovereign. This usually includes things such as participating in a war against one's native country, attempting to overthrow its government, spying on its military, its diplomats, or its secret services for a hostile and foreign power, or attempting to kill its head of state. A person who commits treason is known in law as a traitor.

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Related Research Articles

7th century Century

The 7th century is the period from 601 to 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. The Muslim conquests began with the unification of Arabia by Muhammad starting in 622. After Muhammad's death in 632, Islam expanded beyond the Arabian Peninsula under the Rashidun Caliphate (632–661) and the Umayyad Caliphate (661–750). The Islamic conquest of Persia in the 7th century led to the downfall of the Sassanid Empire. Also conquered during the 7th century were Syria, Palestine, Armenia, Egypt, and North Africa.

824 Year

Year 824 (DCCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 630s decade ran from January 1, 630, to December 31, 639.

The 640s decade ran from January 1, 640, to December 31, 649.

The 650s decade ran from January 1, 650, to December 31, 659.

The 680s decade ran from January 1, 680, to December 31, 689.

827 Year

Year 827 (DCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

634 Year

Year 634 (DCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 634 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Year 636 (DCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 636 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

638 Year

Year 638 (DCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 638 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

762 Year

Year 762 (DCCLXII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 762 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

659 Year

Year 659 (DCLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 659 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

652 Year

Year 652 (DCLII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 652 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

727 Year

Year 727 (DCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 727 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

713 Year

Year 713 (DCCXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 713 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

645 Year

Year 645 (DCXLV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 645 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

663 Year

Year 663 (DCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 663 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

904 Year

Year 904 (CMIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Constans II Byzantine Emperor

Constans II, also called Constantine the Bearded, was emperor of the Byzantine Empire from 641 to 668. He was the last emperor to serve as consul, in 642. Constans is a nickname given to the Emperor, who had been baptized Herakleios and reigned officially as Constantine. The nickname established itself in Byzantine texts and has become standard in modern historiography.

The Type of Constans was an imperial edict issued by Byzantine Emperor Constans II in 648 in an attempt to defuse the confusion and arguments over the Christological doctrine of Monotheletism. For over two centuries, there had been a bitter debate regarding the nature of Christ: the orthodox Chalcedonian position defined Christ as having two natures in one person, whereas Monophysite opponents contended that Jesus Christ possessed but a single nature. At the time, the Byzantine Empire had been at near constant war for fifty years and had lost large territories. It was under great pressure to establish domestic unity. This was hampered by the large number of Byzantines who rejected the Council of Chalcedon in favour of Monophysitism.

References

  1. Muir, William. "Chapter XXVIII, Caliphate of Othman". The Caliphate: Its Rise, Decline and Fall. p. 205.