1676

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1676 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1676
MDCLXXVI
Ab urbe condita 2429
Armenian calendar 1125
ԹՎ ՌՃԻԵ
Assyrian calendar 6426
Balinese saka calendar 1597–1598
Bengali calendar 1083
Berber calendar 2626
English Regnal year 27  Cha. 2   28  Cha. 2
Buddhist calendar 2220
Burmese calendar 1038
Byzantine calendar 7184–7185
Chinese calendar 乙卯年 (Wood  Rabbit)
4372 or 4312
     to 
丙辰年 (Fire  Dragon)
4373 or 4313
Coptic calendar 1392–1393
Discordian calendar 2842
Ethiopian calendar 1668–1669
Hebrew calendar 5436–5437
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1732–1733
 - Shaka Samvat 1597–1598
 - Kali Yuga 4776–4777
Holocene calendar 11676
Igbo calendar 676–677
Iranian calendar 1054–1055
Islamic calendar 1086–1087
Japanese calendar Enpō 4
(延宝4年)
Javanese calendar 1598–1599
Julian calendar Gregorian minus 10 days
Korean calendar 4009
Minguo calendar 236 before ROC
民前236年
Nanakshahi calendar 208
Thai solar calendar 2218–2219
Tibetan calendar 阴木兔年
(female Wood-Rabbit)
1802 or 1421 or 649
     to 
阳火龙年
(male Fire-Dragon)
1803 or 1422 or 650
August 17: Battle of Halmstad Slaghalm1676.jpg
August 17: Battle of Halmstad

1676 (MDCLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar  and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1676th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 676th year of the 2nd millennium, the 76th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1676, the Gregorian calendar was 10days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Contents

Events

December 4: Battle of Lund Charles XI, Battle of Lund.jpg
December 4: Battle of Lund

JanuaryMarch

AprilJune

JulySeptember

OctoberDecember

Date unknown

Births

Robert Walpole Robert Walpole, 1st Earl of Orford by Arthur Pond.jpg
Robert Walpole

Deaths

John Clarke John Clarke picture.jpg
John Clarke
Michiel de Ruyter Bol, Michiel de Ruyter.jpg
Michiel de Ruyter
Matthew Hale Portrait of Sir Matthew Hale Kt.jpg
Matthew Hale

Related Research Articles

The 1630s was a decade that began on January 1, 1630, and ended on December 31, 1639.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1632</span> Calendar year

1632 (MDCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1632nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 632nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 32nd year of the 17th century, and the 3rd year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1632, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1621</span> Calendar year

1621 (MDCXXI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1621st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 621st year of the 2nd millennium, the 21st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1620s decade. As of the start of 1621, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1639</span> Calendar year

1639 (MDCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1639th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 639th year of the 2nd millennium, the 39th year of the 17th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1639, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1592</span> Calendar year

1592 (MDXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar, the 1592nd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 592nd year of the 2nd millennium, the 92nd year of the 16th century, and the 3rd year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1592, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1670s decade ran from January 1, 1670, to December 31, 1679.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1647</span> Calendar year

1647 (MDCXLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1647th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 647th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1640s decade. As of the start of 1647, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1663</span> Calendar year

1663 (MDCLXIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1663rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 663rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 63rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1660s decade. As of the start of 1663, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">1675</span> Calendar year

1675 (MDCLXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1675th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 675th year of the 2nd millennium, the 75th year of the 17th century, and the 6th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1675, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Metacomet</span> Elected chief of the Wampanoag Indians

Metacomet, also known as Pometacom, Metacom, and by his adopted English name King Philip, was sachem to the Wampanoag people and the second son of the sachem Massasoit. Metacom became sachem in 1662 when his brother Wamsutta died shortly after the death of their father. Wamsutta's widow Weetamoo, sachem of the Pocasset, was Metacom's ally and friend for the rest of his life. Metacom married Weetamoo's younger sister Wootonekanuske. It is unclear how many children they had or what happened to them. Wootonekanuske and one of their sons were sold to slavery in the West Indies following the defeat of the Native Americans in what became known as King Philip's War.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">King Philip's War</span> 1675–1678 conflict between Native Americans and New England colonists

King Philip's War was an armed conflict in 1675–1676 between indigenous inhabitants of New England and New England colonists and their indigenous allies. The war is named for Metacom, the Wampanoag chief who adopted the name Philip because of the friendly relations between his father Massasoit and the Mayflower Pilgrims. The war continued in the most northern reaches of New England until the signing of the Treaty of Casco Bay on April 12, 1678.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wampanoag</span> Native American ethnic group

The Wampanoag, also rendered Wôpanâak, are a Native American people and an Indigenous people of the Northeastern Woodlands based in southeastern Massachusetts and historically parts of eastern Rhode Island, Their territory included the islands of Martha's Vineyard and Nantucket.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Massachusett</span> Native American tribe in MA

The Massachusett were a Native American tribe from the region in and around present-day Greater Boston in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts. The name comes from the Massachusett language term for "At the Great Hill," referring to the Blue Hills overlooking Boston Harbor from the south.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Benjamin Church (ranger)</span> American military officer and Ranger during Americas Colonial era

Benjamin Church was an English colonist in North America. He was a military leader of the historic predecessor of the United States Army Rangers, captain of the first Ranger force in America (1675). Church was commissioned by Josiah Winslow, the Governor of the Plymouth Colony, to form the first ranger company for King Philip's War. He later commanded the company to raid Acadia during King William's and Queen Anne's wars in the early 1700s, as French and English hostilities played out in North America. The two powers were competing for control in colonial territories. He was promoted to major and ended his service at the rank of colonel, as noted on his gravestone.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">John Alderman</span> 17th-century Wampanoag Praying Indian

John Alderman, also known as Isaac and Antoquan, was a Wampanoag praying Indian who shot and killed the rebellious Native American leader Metacomet in 1676, during King Philip's War, while taking part in a punitive expedition led by Captain Benjamin Church. Alderman was a subsachem in the Westport/Dartmouth area of what is now Bristol County, Massachusetts. He was called Alderman because he was considered a close associate and counselor for King Philip. When Philip summarily murdered Alderman's brother in front of him because of his dissension, Alderman changed sides and joined Benjamin Church, an English colonist who had settled in nearby Little Compton.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Weetamoo</span> Native American leader

Weetamoo, also referred to as Weethao, Weetamoe, Wattimore, Namumpum, and Tatapanunum, was a Pocasset Wampanoag Native American Chief. She was the sunksqua, or female sachem, of Pocasset tribe, which occupied contemporary Tiverton, Rhode Island in 1620.

John Sassamon, also known as Wussausmon, was a Massachusett man who lived in New England during the colonial era. He converted to Christianity and became a praying Indian, helping to serve as an interpreter to New England colonists. In January 1675, Sassamon was ambushed and assassinated. A mixed jury of colonists and Indian elders convicted and executed three Wampanoag men for his murder. These events helped spark the conflict known as King Philip's War, in which the New England Colonies defeated the Wampanoag and ended armed resistance by the Native Americans of southeastern New England.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Great Swamp Fight</span> 1675 battle of King Philips War

The Great Swamp Fight or the Great Swamp Massacre was a crucial battle fought during King Philip's War between the colonial militia of New England and the Narragansett people in December 1675. It was fought near the villages of Kingston and West Kingston in the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations. The combined force of the New England militia included 150 Pequots, and they inflicted a huge number of Narragansett casualties, including many hundred women and children. The battle has been described as "one of the most brutal and lopsided military encounters in all of New England's history." Since the 1930s, Narragansett and Wampanoag people commemorate the battle annually in a ceremony initiated by Narragansett-Wampanoag scholar Princess Red Wing.

<span class="mw-page-title-main">Wheeler's Surprise</span> 1675 battle in King Philips War

Wheeler's Surprise, and the ensuing Siege of Brookfield, was a battle between Nipmuc Indians under Muttawmp, and the English colonists of the Massachusetts Bay Colony under the command of Thomas Wheeler and Captain Edward Hutchinson, in August 1675 during King Philip's War. The battle consisted of an initial ambush by the Nipmucs on Wheeler's unsuspecting party, followed by an attack on Brookfield, Massachusetts, and the consequent besieging of the remains of the colonial force. While the place where the siege part of the battle took place has always been known, the location of the initial ambush was a subject of extensive controversy among historians in the late nineteenth century.

References

  1. Procedure 373 of the Guatemalan Real Audiencia in the General Archive of Indias.
  2. Walford, Cornelius, ed. (1876). "Fires, Great". The Insurance Cyclopeadia: Being an Historical Treasury of Events and Circumstances Connected with the Origin and Progress of Insurance. C. & E. Layton. p. 43.
  3. Hubbard, William (1848). A General History of New England, from the discovery to MDCLXXX. Boston: Little, Brown.
  4. "Leigh Rayment's list of baronets". Archived from the original on October 21, 2019.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: unfit URL (link)
  5. "America's First Coffeehouse". Massachusetts Travel Journal. Archived from the original on September 27, 2010. Retrieved September 21, 2010.
  6. "Robert Walpole, 1st earl of Orford | prime minister of Great Britain". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved September 1, 2021.