1511

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1511 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1511
MDXI
Ab urbe condita 2264
Armenian calendar 960
ԹՎ ՋԿ
Assyrian calendar 6261
Balinese saka calendar 1432–1433
Bengali calendar 918
Berber calendar 2461
English Regnal year 2  Hen. 8   3  Hen. 8
Buddhist calendar 2055
Burmese calendar 873
Byzantine calendar 7019–7020
Chinese calendar 庚午(Metal  Horse)
4207 or 4147
     to 
辛未年 (Metal  Goat)
4208 or 4148
Coptic calendar 1227–1228
Discordian calendar 2677
Ethiopian calendar 1503–1504
Hebrew calendar 5271–5272
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1567–1568
 - Shaka Samvat 1432–1433
 - Kali Yuga 4611–4612
Holocene calendar 11511
Igbo calendar 511–512
Iranian calendar 889–890
Islamic calendar 916–917
Japanese calendar Eishō 8
(永正8年)
Javanese calendar 1428–1429
Julian calendar 1511
MDXI
Korean calendar 3844
Minguo calendar 401 before ROC
民前401年
Nanakshahi calendar 43
Thai solar calendar 2053–2054
Tibetan calendar 阳金马年
(male Iron-Horse)
1637 or 1256 or 484
     to 
阴金羊年
(female Iron-Goat)
1638 or 1257 or 485
August 15: The capture of Malacca by the forces of Afonso de Albuquerque of Portugal. Malacca in 1511.png
August 15: The capture of Malacca by the forces of Afonso de Albuquerque of Portugal.

Year 1511 ( MDXI ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2009, 2015, and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryJune

April 9 is the 99th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 266 days remaining until the end of the year.

St Johns College, Cambridge college of the University of Cambridge

St John's College is a constituent college of the University of Cambridge. The college was founded by Lady Margaret Beaufort. In constitutional terms, the college is a charitable corporation established by a charter dated 9 April 1511. The aims of the college, as specified by its statutes, are the promotion of education, religion, learning and research.

Kingdom of England historic sovereign kingdom on the British Isles (927–1649; 1660–1707)

The Kingdom of England was a sovereign state on the island of Great Britain from 927, when it emerged from various Anglo-Saxon kingdoms until 1707, when it united with Scotland to form the Kingdom of Great Britain.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

Henry VIII of England 16th-century King of England

Henry VIII was King of England from 1509 until his death in 1547. Henry was the second Tudor monarch, succeeding his father, Henry VII. Henry is best known for his six marriages, in particular his efforts to have his first marriage, to Catherine of Aragon, annulled. His disagreement with the Pope on the question of such an annulment led Henry to initiate the English Reformation, separating the Church of England from papal authority. He appointed himself the Supreme Head of the Church of England and dissolved convents and monasteries, for which he was excommunicated. Henry is also known as "the father of the Royal Navy"; he invested heavily in the Navy, increasing its size greatly from a few to more than 50 ships.

Flagship vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships

A flagship is a vessel used by the commanding officer of a group of naval ships, characteristically a flag officer entitled by custom to fly a distinguishing flag. Used more loosely, it is the lead ship in a fleet of vessels, typically the first, largest, fastest, most heavily armed, or best known.

Date unknown

Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar Spanish governor of Cuba

Diego Velázquez de Cuéllar was a Spanish conquistador. He conquered and governed Cuba on behalf of Spain and moved Havana from the south coast of western Cuba to the north coast, placing it well as a port for Spanish trade.

Hernán Cortés Spanish conquistador

Hernán Cortés de Monroy y Pizarro Altamirano, Marquis of the Valley of Oaxaca was a Spanish Conquistador who led an expedition that caused the fall of the Aztec Empire and brought large portions of what is now mainland Mexico under the rule of the King of Castile in the early 16th century. Cortés was part of the generation of Spanish colonizers who began the first phase of the Spanish colonization of the Americas.

Cuba Country in the Caribbean

Cuba, officially the Republic of Cuba, is a country comprising the island of Cuba as well as Isla de la Juventud and several minor archipelagos. Cuba is located in the northern Caribbean where the Caribbean Sea, Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Ocean meet. It is east of the Yucatán Peninsula (Mexico), south of both the U.S. state of Florida and the Bahamas, west of Haiti and north of both Jamaica and the Cayman Islands. Havana is the largest city and capital; other major cities include Santiago de Cuba and Camagüey. The area of the Republic of Cuba is 110,860 square kilometres (42,800 sq mi). The island of Cuba is the largest island in Cuba and in the Caribbean, with an area of 105,006 square kilometres (40,543 sq mi), and the second-most populous after Hispaniola, with over 11 million inhabitants.

Births

Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg Dronning-Dorothea.jpg
Dorothea of Saxe-Lauenburg
Giorgio Vasari Giorgio Vasari Selbstportrat.jpg
Giorgio Vasari
Michael Servetus Michael Servetus.jpg
Michael Servetus

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Henry, Duke of Cornwall, was the first child of King Henry VIII of England and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon, and though his birth was celebrated as that of the heir apparent, he died within weeks. His death and Henry VIII's failure to produce another surviving male heir with Catherine led to succession and marriage crises that affected the relationship between the English church and Roman Catholicism, giving rise to the English Reformation.

April 2 is the 92nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 273 days remaining until the end of the year.

Deaths

Demetrios Chalkokondyles Ghirlandaio - Tornabuoni Chapel - a Humanist philosopher.jpg
Demetrios Chalkokondyles
Oliviero Carafa Oliviero Carafa.jpg
Oliviero Carafa
Francis of Denmark Francis of Denmark, Norway & Sweden sculpture c 1530 (photo 2009) crop.jpg
Francis of Denmark

Related Research Articles

1573 Year

Year 1573 (MDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

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1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1601 Year

1601 (MDCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1601st year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 601st year of the 2nd millennium, the 1st year of the 17th century, and the 2nd year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1601, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923. January 1 of this year (1601-01-01) is used as the base of file dates and of Active Directory Logon dates by Microsoft Windows. It is also the date from which ANSI dates are counted and were adopted by the American National Standards Institute for use with COBOL and other computer languages. This epoch is the beginning of the 400-year Gregorian leap-year cycle within which digital files first existed; the last year of any such cycle is the only leap year whose year number is divisible by 100. All versions of the Microsoft Windows operating system from Windows 95 onward count units of one hundred nanoseconds from this epoch.

1638 Year

1638 (MDCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1638th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 638th year of the 2nd millennium, the 38th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1638, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1565 (MDLXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1537 Year

Year 1537 (MDXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1536 Year

Year 1536 (MDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1523 Year

Year 1523 (MDXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1683 Year

1683 (MDCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1683rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 683rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 83rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1683, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1532 Year

Year 1532 (MDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1524 Year

Year 1524 (MDXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1516 Year

Year 1516 (MDXVI) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1515 Year

Year 1515 (MDXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1513 Year

Year 1513 (MDXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1509 Year

Year 1509 (MDIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1491 (MCDXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1439 Year

Year 1439 (MCDXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. van Gent, Robert Harry. "Islamic-Western Calendar Converter". Utrecht University . Retrieved 2011-08-23.
  2. Mentioned by Zhang Xie writing a century later.
  3. Oliver, Neil. A History of Scotland. p. 191. ISBN   978-0-7538-2663-8.