Common year starting on Wednesday

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A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year (a year with 365 days) that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December.[ citation needed ] Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the Gregorian calendar [1] or, likewise, 2009, 2015 and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year is one of the three possible common years in which a century year can begin on, and occurs in century years that yield a remainder of 200 when divided by 400. The most recent such year was 1800 and the next one will be 2200.

Contents

Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th: the only one in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

In this common year, Martin Luther King Jr. Day is on January 20, Valentine's Day is on a Friday, President's Day is on February 17, Saint Patrick's Day is on Monday, Memorial day is on May 26, U.S. Independence Day is on a Friday, Labor Day is on its earliest possible date, September 1, Columbus Day is on October 13, Halloween is on a Friday, Veterans Day is on a Tuesday, Thanksgiving is on November 27, and Christmas is on a Thursday. This is the only type of year in which all dates fall on their respective weekdays 57 times in the 400 year Gregorian Calendar cycle.

The Election Day in the USA is on November 4th, as well in leap years starting on Tuesday.

Calendars

Calendar for any common year starting on Wednesday,
presented as common in many English-speaking areas

01020304
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01
02030405060708
09101112131415
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3031 
0102030405
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010203
04050607080910
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18192021222324
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01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
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2930 
 
0102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031 
 
0102
03040506070809
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17181920212223
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31 
010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
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01020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 
 
01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30 
010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031 
 

ISO 8601-conformant calendar with week numbers for
any common year starting on Wednesday (dominical letter E)

0102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031 
 
0102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
2425262728
 
0102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
31 
010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930 
 
01020304
05060708091011
12131415161718
19202122232425
262728293031 
 
01
02030405060708
09101112131415
16171819202122
23242526272829
30 
010203040506
07080910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031 
 
010203
04050607080910
11121314151617
18192021222324
25262728293031
 
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
2930 
 
0102030405
06070809101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031 
 
0102
03040506070809
10111213141516
17181920212223
24252627282930
 
01020304050607
08091011121314
15161718192021
22232425262728
293031 
 

Applicable years

Gregorian Calendar

In the (currently used) Gregorian calendar, alongside Sunday, Monday, Friday or Saturday, the fourteen types of year (seven common, seven leap) repeat in a 400-year cycle (20871 weeks). Forty-three common years per cycle or exactly 10.75% start on a Wednesday. The 28-year sub-cycle only spans across century years divisible by 400, e.g. 1600, 2000, and 2400.

Gregorian common years starting on Wednesday [1]
Decade1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th10th
16th century prior to first adoption (proleptic) 1586 1597
17th century 1603 1614 1625 1631 1642 1653 1659 1670 1681 1687 1698
18th century 1710 1721 1727 1738 1749 1755 1766 1777 1783 1794 1800
19th century 1806 1817 1823 1834 1845 1851 1862 1873 1879 1890
20th century 1902 1913 1919 1930 1941 1947 1958 1969 1975 1986 1997
21st century 2003 2014 2025 2031 2042 2053 2059 2070 2081 2087 2098
22nd century 2110 2121 2127 2138 2149 2155 2166 2177 2183 2194 2200
23rd century 2206 2217 2223 2234 2245 2251 2262 2273 2279 2290
24th century 2302 2313 2319 2330 2341 2347 2358 2369 2375 2386 2397

400 year cycle

century 1: 3, 14, 25, 31, 42, 53, 59, 70, 81, 87, 98

century 2: 110, 121, 127, 138, 149, 155, 166, 177, 183, 194, 200

century 3: 206, 217, 223, 234, 245, 251, 262, 273, 279, 290

century 4: 302, 313, 319, 330, 341, 347, 358, 369, 375, 386, 397

Julian Calendar

In the now-obsolete Julian calendar, the fourteen types of year (seven common, seven leap) repeat in a 28-year cycle (1461 weeks). A leap year has two adjoining dominical letters (one for January and February and the other for March to December, as 29 February has no letter). This sequence occurs exactly once within a cycle, and every common letter thrice.

As the Julian calendar repeats after 28 years that means it will also repeat after 700 years, i.e. 25 cycles. The year's position in the cycle is given by the formula ((year + 8) mod 28) + 1). Years 2, 8 and 19 of the cycle are common years beginning on Wednesday. 2017 is year 10 of the cycle. Approximately 10.71% of all years are common years beginning on Wednesday.

Julian common years starting on Wednesday
Decade1st2nd3rd4th5th6th7th8th9th10th
15th century 1410 1421 1427 1438 1449 1455 1466 1477 1483 1494
16th century 1505 1511 1522 1533 1539 1550 1561 1567 1578 15891595
17th century1606161716231634164516511662167316791690
18th century17011707171817291735174617571763177417851791
19th century18021813181918301841184718581869187518861897
20th century19031914192519311942195319591970198119871998
21st century20092015202620372043205420652071208220932099

Related Research Articles

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2007, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more.

A common year starting on Friday is any non-leap year that begins on Friday, 1 January, and ends on Friday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is C. 2021, the current year, is a common year starting on a Friday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2010 and the next such year will be 2027 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2005, 2011 and 2022 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year is one of the three possible common years in which a century year can begin on, and occurs in century years that yield a remainder of 100 when divided by 400. The most recent such year was 1700 and the next one will be 2100.

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019 and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year is one of the three possible common years in which a century year can begin on and occurs in century years that yield a remainder of 300 when divided by 400. The most recent such year was 1900 and the next one will be 2300.

Dominical letters or Sunday letters are a method used to determine the day of the week for particular dates. When using this method, each year is assigned a letter depending on which day of the week the year starts on.

A leap year starting on Sunday is any year with 366 days that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are AG. The most recent year of such kind was 2012 and the next one will be 2040 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1996 and 2024 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The most recent year of such kind was 2019 and the next one will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more.

A leap year starting on Monday is any year with 366 days that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are GF. The most recent year of such kind was 1996 and the next one will be 2024 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2008, and 2036 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A leap year starting on Tuesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are FE. The most recent year of such kind was 2008 and the next one will be 2036 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise 2020 and 2048 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. The most recent year of such kind was 2011 and the next one will be 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2006, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar. See below for more.

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more.

A leap year starting on Saturday is any year with 366 days that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are BA. The most recent year of such kind was 2000 and the next one will be 2028 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2012 and 2040 in the obsolescent Julian calendar. In the Gregorian calendar, years divisible by 400 are always leap years starting on Saturday. The most recent such year was 2000 and the next one will be 2400, see below for more.

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB. The most recent year of such kind was 2016 and the next one will be 2044 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A leap year starting on Thursday is any year with 366 days that begins on Thursday 1 January, and ends on Friday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are DC. The most recent year of such kind was 2004 and the next one will be 2032 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2016 and 2044 in the obsolete Julian calendar.

A leap year starting on Wednesday is any year with 366 days that begins on Wednesday 1 January and ends on Thursday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are ED. The most recent year of such kind was 2020 and the next one will be 2048, or likewise, 2004 and 2032 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more.

The determination of the day of the week for any date may be performed with a variety of algorithms. In addition, perpetual calendars require no calculation by the user, and are essentially lookup tables. A typical application is to calculate the day of the week on which someone was born or a specific event occurred.

Doomsday rule Way of calculating the day of the week of a given date

The Doomsday rule is an algorithm of determination of the day of the week for a given date. It provides a perpetual calendar because the Gregorian calendar moves in cycles of 400 years. The algorithm for mental calculation was devised by John Conway in 1973, drawing inspiration from Lewis Carroll's perpetual calendar algorithm. It takes advantage of each year having a certain day of the week upon which certain easy-to-remember dates, called the doomsdays, fall; for example, the last day of February, 4/4, 6/6, 8/8, 10/10, and 12/12 all occur on the same day of the week in any year. Applying the Doomsday algorithm involves three steps: Determination of the anchor day for the century, calculation of the anchor day for the year from the one for the century, and selection of the closest date out of those that always fall on the doomsday, e.g., 4/4 and 6/6, and count of the number of days between that date and the date in question to arrive at the day of the week. The technique applies to both the Gregorian calendar and the Julian calendar, although their doomsdays are usually different days of the week.

The solar cycle is a 28-year cycle of the Julian calendar, and 400-year cycle of the Gregorian calendar with respect to the week. It occurs because leap years occur every 4 years and there are 7 possible days to start a leap year, making a 28-year sequence.

The ISO week date system is effectively a leap week calendar system that is part of the ISO 8601 date and time standard issued by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) since 1988 and, before that, it was defined in ISO (R) 2015 since 1971. It is used (mainly) in government and business for fiscal years, as well as in timekeeping. This was previously known as "Industrial date coding". The system specifies a week year atop the Gregorian calendar by defining a notation for ordinal weeks of the year.

A century leap year is a leap year in the Gregorian calendar that is divisible by 400 without a remainder.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It was introduced in October 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII as a minor modification of the Julian calendar, reducing the average year from 365.25 days to 365.2425 days, and adjusting for the drift in the 'tropical' or 'solar' year that the inaccuracy had caused during the intervening centuries.

References

  1. 1 2 Robert van Gent (2017). "The Mathematics of the ISO 8601 Calendar". Utrecht University, Department of Mathematics. Retrieved 20 July 2017.
  2. Robert van Gent (2017). "The Mathematics of the ISO 8601 Calendar". Utrecht University, Department of Mathematics. Retrieved 20 July 2017.