1561

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1561 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1561
MDLXI
Ab urbe condita 2314
Armenian calendar 1010
ԹՎ ՌԺ
Assyrian calendar 6311
Balinese saka calendar 1482–1483
Bengali calendar 968
Berber calendar 2511
English Regnal year 3  Eliz. 1   4  Eliz. 1
Buddhist calendar 2105
Burmese calendar 923
Byzantine calendar 7069–7070
Chinese calendar 庚申(Metal  Monkey)
4257 or 4197
     to 
辛酉年 (Metal  Rooster)
4258 or 4198
Coptic calendar 1277–1278
Discordian calendar 2727
Ethiopian calendar 1553–1554
Hebrew calendar 5321–5322
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1617–1618
 - Shaka Samvat 1482–1483
 - Kali Yuga 4661–4662
Holocene calendar 11561
Igbo calendar 561–562
Iranian calendar 939–940
Islamic calendar 968–969
Japanese calendar Eiroku 4
(永禄4年)
Javanese calendar 1480–1481
Julian calendar 1561
MDLXI
Korean calendar 3894
Minguo calendar 351 before ROC
民前351年
Nanakshahi calendar 93
Thai solar calendar 2103–2104
Tibetan calendar 阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1687 or 1306 or 534
     to 
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1688 or 1307 or 535
May 8: Madrid is the new capital of Spain. Dibujo madrid 1562.JPG
May 8: Madrid is the new capital of Spain.

Year 1561 ( MDLXI ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2009, 2015, and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

October 18: Fourth Battle of Kawanakajima. Sengoku period battle.jpg
October 18: Fourth Battle of Kawanakajima.
Map of New Spain in 1561 Ruscelli Nueva Hispania Tabula Nova 1561 UTA.jpg
Map of New Spain in 1561

JanuaryJune

January 31 is the 31st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 334 days remain until the end of the year.

Huguenots Ethnoreligious group composed of Calvinists from France

Huguenots are an ethnoreligious group of French Protestants.

Kingdom of France kingdom in Western Europe from 843 to 1791

The Kingdom of France was a medieval and early modern monarchy in Western Europe. It was among the most powerful states in Europe and a great power since the Late Middle Ages and the Hundred Years' War. It was also an early colonial power, with possessions around the world.

JulyDecember

July is the seventh month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Caesar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar.

Arauco War Conflict between Spanish settlers of Chile and indigenous peoples

The Arauco War was a long-running conflict between colonial Spaniards and the Mapuche people, mostly fought in the Araucanía. The conflict begun at first as a reaction to the Spanish conquest attempt establishing cities and forcing Mapuches into servitude. It subsequently evolved over time into phases of low intensity warfare, drawn-out sieges, slave-hunting expeditions, pillaging raids, punitive expeditions and renewed Spanish attempts to secure lost territories. Abduction of women and war rape was common on both sides.

Pedro de Avendaño a Spanish soldier that had arrived in Chile with the army of García Hurtado de Mendoza in 1557. He distinguished himself in the Battle of Millarapue. He later served in the garrison of Cañete under captain Alonso de Reinoso. Reinoso eventually found an Indian who betrayed the location of the fugitive Mapuche toqui Caupolicán. Avendaño, with 50 men and the traitorous Indian as a guide, marched in stormy weather into the mountains to Pilmaiquén and captured Caupolicán as he was planning a new counter-offensive against the Spanish, near the modern Antihuala, on February 5, 1558. He brought the toqui back to Cañete where he was eventually executed by empalement at the order of corregidor Reinoso.

Date unknown

Calvinism Protestant branch of Christianity

Calvinism is a major branch of Protestantism that follows the theological tradition and forms of Christian practice set down by John Calvin and other Reformation-era theologians.

Flanders Community and region of Belgium

Flanders is the Dutch-speaking northern portion of Belgium and one of the communities, regions and language areas of Belgium. However, there are several overlapping definitions, including ones related to culture, language, politics and history, and sometimes involving neighbouring countries. The demonym associated with Flanders is Fleming, while the corresponding adjective is Flemish. The official capital of Flanders is Brussels, although the Brussels Capital Region has an independent regional government, and the government of Flanders only oversees the community aspects of Flanders life in Brussels such as (Flemish) culture and education.

Metrical psalter kind of Bible translation: book containing a metrical translation of all or part of the Book of Psalms in vernacular poetry, meant to be sung as hymns in a church

A metrical psalter is a kind of Bible translation: a book containing a metrical translation of all or part of the Book of Psalms in vernacular poetry, meant to be sung as hymns in a church. Some metrical psalters include melodies or even harmonizations. The composition of metrical psalters was a large enterprise of the Protestant Reformation, especially in its Calvinist manifestation.

Merchant Taylors School, Northwood independent day school for boys, originally in London, now at Northwood, Hertfordshire

Merchant Taylors' School (MTS) is a British independent private day school for boys. Since 1933 it has been on 285 acres (115 ha) of grounds at Sandy Lodge in the Three Rivers district of Hertfordshire.

City of London City and county in United Kingdom

The City of London is a city and local government district that contains the historic centre and the primary central business district (CBD) of London. It constituted most of London from its settlement by the Romans in the 1st century AD to the Middle Ages, but the agglomeration has since grown far beyond the City's borders. The City is now only a tiny part of the metropolis of London, though it remains a notable part of central London. Administratively, it forms one of the 33 local authority districts of Greater London; however, the City of London is not a London borough, a status reserved for the other 32 districts. It is also a separate county of England, being an enclave surrounded by Greater London. It is the smallest county in the United Kingdom.

Thomas White (merchant) English merchant

Sir Thomas White was an English cloth merchant, Lord Mayor of London in 1553, and a civic benefactor and founder of St John's College, Oxford.

Births

Francis Bacon Somer Francis Bacon.jpg
Francis Bacon
Fujiwara Seika Fujiwara Seika.jpg
Fujiwara Seika

January 1 is the first day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. There are 364 days remaining until the end of the year. This day is known as New Year's Day since the day marks the beginning of the year. It is also the first day of the first quarter of the year and the first half of the year.

Sir Thomas Walsingham was a courtier to Queen Elizabeth I and literary patron to such poets as Thomas Watson, Thomas Nashe, George Chapman and Christopher Marlowe. He was related to Elizabeth's spymaster Francis Walsingham and the employer of Marlowe's murderer Ingram Frizer. This connection is one of the reasons offered for suggesting that Marlowe's death may have been linked with intelligence work, and not a dispute over a bill for food and accommodation, as in the coroner's verdict.

1630 Year

1630 (MDCXXX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1630th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 630th year of the 2nd millennium, the 30th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1630s decade. As of the start of 1630, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Deaths

Ridolfo Ghirlandaio Ridolfo del Ghirlandaio 009.jpg
Ridolfo Ghirlandaio

Related Research Articles

1608 Year

1608 (MDCVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1608th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 608th year of the 2nd millennium, the 8th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1600s decade. As of the start of 1608, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1564 Year

Year 1564 (MDLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1574 Year

Year 1574 (MDLXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1680 Year

1680 (MDCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1680th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 680th year of the 2nd millennium, the 80th year of the 17th century, and the 1st year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1680, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1546 Year

Year 1546 (MDXLVI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1602 Year

1602 (MDCII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1602, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1586 Year

1586 (MDLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1586, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1577 Year

Year 1577 (MDLXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1576 Year

Year 1576 (MDLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1570 Year

Year 1570 (MDLXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1693 Year

1693 (MDCXCIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1693rd year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 693rd year of the 2nd millennium, the 93rd year of the 17th century, and the 4th year of the 1690s decade. As of the start of 1693, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1686 Year

1686 (MDCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1686th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 686th year of the 2nd millennium, the 86th year of the 17th century, and the 7th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1686, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1562 Year

Year 1562 (MDLXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1558 Year

Year 1558 (MDLVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

1553 Year

Year 1553 (MDLIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1532 Year

Year 1532 (MDXXXII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. "Himmelserscheinung über Nürnberg" [Celestial phenomenon over Nuremberg]. NEBIS (in German). Zurich Library. April 14, 1561. (2 pages).
  2. "BBC History Magazine vol 12 no 6 (June 2011), p13". Archived from the original on November 9, 2014. Retrieved November 9, 2014.
  3. "All People That on Earth Do Dwell". The Cyber Hymnal. Archived from the original on July 3, 2011. Retrieved June 5, 2012.
  4. Ringler, William A.; Flachmann, Michael, eds. (1988). "Preface". Beware the Cat. San Marino, CA: Huntington Library.
  5. "Francis Bacon | Biography, Philosophy, & Facts". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 31, 2019.