April 19

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April 19 is the 109th day of the year(110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 256 days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing one additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

AD 65 (LXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. At the time, it was known as the Year of the Consulship of Nerva and Vestinus. The denomination AD 65 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

A freedman or freedwoman is a former slave who has been released from slavery, usually by legal means. Historically, slaves were freed either by manumission or emancipation. A fugitive slave is one who escaped slavery by fleeing.

The conspiracy of Gaius Calpurnius Piso in AD 65 was a major turning point in the reign of the Roman emperor Nero. The plot reflected the growing discontent among the ruling class of the Roman state with Nero's increasingly despotic leadership, and as a result is a significant event on the road towards his eventual suicide and the chaos of the Year of the Four Emperors which followed.

Births

626 Year

Year 626 (DCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 626 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Eanflæd was a Deiran princess, queen of Northumbria and later, the abbess of an influential Christian monastery in Whitby, England. She was the daughter of King Edwin of Northumbria and Æthelburg, who in turn was the daughter of King Æthelberht of Kent. In or shortly after 642 Eanflæd became the second wife of King Oswiu of Northumbria. After Oswiu's death in 670, she retired to Whitby Abbey, which had been founded by Hilda of Whitby. Eanflæd became the abbess around 680 and remained there until her death. The monastery had strong association with members of the Northumbrian royal family and played an important role in the establishment of Roman Christianity in England.

Year 1452 (MCDLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

843 Year

Year 843 (DCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Judith of Bavaria (died 843) Empress consort of the Holy Roman Empire

Queen Judith, also known as Judith of Bavaria, was the daughter of Count Welf of Bavaria and Saxon noblewoman, Hedwig. She was the second wife of Louis the Pious, King of the Franks and Holy Roman Emperor, which brought her the titles of queen and empress. Marriage to Louis marked the beginning of her rise as an influential figure in the Carolingian court. She had two children with Louis, a daughter Gisela and a son, Charles the Bald. The birth of her son led to a major dispute over the imperial succession, and tensions between her and Charles' half-brothers from Louis' first marriage. She would eventually fall from grace when Charles' wife, the new empress Ermentrude of Orléans, rose to power. She was buried in 846 in Tours.

1012 Year

Year in topic Year 1012 (MXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Holidays and observances

Calendar of saints Christian liturgical calendar celebrating saints

The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".

Ælfheah of Canterbury 10th and 11th-century Archbishop of Canterbury and saint

Ælfheah was an Anglo-Saxon Bishop of Winchester, later Archbishop of Canterbury. He became an anchorite before being elected abbot of Bath Abbey. His reputation for piety and sanctity led to his promotion to the episcopate, and eventually, to his becoming archbishop. Ælfheah furthered the cult of Dunstan and also encouraged learning. He was captured by Viking raiders in 1011 during the Siege of Canterbury and later killed by them the following year after refusing to allow himself to be ransomed. Ælfheah was canonised as a saint in 1078. Thomas Becket, a later Archbishop of Canterbury, prayed to him just before his own murder in Canterbury Cathedral.

The Blessed Conrad of Ascoli was an Italian Friar Minor and missionary; his feast day is April 19.

Related Research Articles

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May 13 is the 133rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 232 days remain until the end of the year.

May 14 is the 134th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 231 days remain until the end of the year.

November 22 is the 326th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 39 days remain until the end of the year.

November 7 is the 311th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 54 days remain until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

October 8 is the 281st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 84 days remain until the end of the year.

October 18 is the 291st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 74 days remain until the end of the year.

October 16 is the 289th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 76 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 25 is the 268th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 97 days remain until the end of the year.

August 20 is the 232nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 133 days remain until the end of the year.

April 4 is the 94th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 271 days remain until the end of the year.

References

  1. Ranter, Harro. "ASN Aircraft accident Boeing 737-2H4 RP-C3010 Davao". aviation-safety.net. Retrieved 2019-04-17.
  2. Richardson IV 2011, p. 317.
  3. transl.; ed.,; Thackston, annot. by Wheeler M. (1999). The Jahangirnama : memoirs of Jahangir, Emperor of India. New York [u.a.]: Oxford Univ. Press. p. 300. ISBN   9780195127188.CS1 maint: Extra text: authors list (link)