1321

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1321 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1321
MCCCXXI
Ab urbe condita 2074
Armenian calendar 770
ԹՎ ՉՀ
Assyrian calendar 6071
Balinese saka calendar 1242–1243
Bengali calendar 728
Berber calendar 2271
English Regnal year 14  Edw. 2   15  Edw. 2
Buddhist calendar 1865
Burmese calendar 683
Byzantine calendar 6829–6830
Chinese calendar 庚申(Metal  Monkey)
4017 or 3957
     to 
辛酉年 (Metal  Rooster)
4018 or 3958
Coptic calendar 1037–1038
Discordian calendar 2487
Ethiopian calendar 1313–1314
Hebrew calendar 5081–5082
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1377–1378
 - Shaka Samvat 1242–1243
 - Kali Yuga 4421–4422
Holocene calendar 11321
Igbo calendar 321–322
Iranian calendar 699–700
Islamic calendar 720–721
Japanese calendar Gen'ō 3 / Genkō 1
(元亨元年)
Javanese calendar 1232–1233
Julian calendar 1321
MCCCXXI
Korean calendar 3654
Minguo calendar 591 before ROC
民前591年
Nanakshahi calendar −147
Thai solar calendar 1863–1864
Tibetan calendar 阳金猴年
(male Iron-Monkey)
1447 or 1066 or 294
     to 
阴金鸡年
(female Iron-Rooster)
1448 or 1067 or 295

Year 1321 ( MCCCXXI ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

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Related Research Articles

Andronikos III Palaiologos Byzantine emperor

Andronikos III Palaiologos, commonly Latinized as Andronicus III Palaeologus, was the Byzantine emperor from 1328 to 1341. Born Andronikos Doukas Angelos Komnenos Palaiologos, he was the son of Michael IX Palaiologos and Rita of Armenia. He was proclaimed co-emperor in his youth, before 1313, and in April 1321 he rebelled in opposition to his grandfather, Andronikos II Palaiologos. He was formally crowned co-emperor in February 1325, before ousting his grandfather outright and becoming sole emperor on 24 May 1328.

Year 1326 (MCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1310s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1310, and ended on December 31, 1319.

The 1320s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1320, and ended on December 31, 1329.

Year 1331 (MCCCXXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1371 (MCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1330s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1330, and ended on December 31, 1339.

Year 1344 (MCCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1362 (MCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1373 (MCCCLXXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Stefan Dečanski King of Serbia

Stefan Uroš III Nemanjić, known as Stefan Dečanski, was the King of Serbia from 6 January 1322 to 8 September 1331. Dečanski was the son of King Stefan Milutin, and he defeated several of his family members vying for the throne. He took his epithet Dečanski from the great monastery he built at Dečani.

Stefan Milutin King of Serbia

Stefan Uroš II Milutin, known as Stefan Milutin, was the King of Serbia between 1282–1321, a member of the Nemanjić dynasty. He was one of the most powerful rulers of Serbia in the Middle Ages. Milutin is credited with strongly resisting the efforts of Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos to impose Roman Catholicism on the Balkans after the Union of Lyons in 1274. During his regin, Serbian economic power grew rapidly, mostly due to the development of mining. He founded Novo Brdo, which became an internationally important silver mining site. As most of the Nemanjić monarchs, he was proclaimed a saint by the Serbian Orthodox Church with a feast day on October 30. Milutin appears in the Dante Alighieri's narrative poem Divine Comedy.

Eudokia Palaiologina or was the third daughter of Byzantine Emperor Michael VIII Palaiologos and his wife, Theodora, a grandniece of Emperor John III Doukas Vatatzes of Nicaea.

Mary of Hungary, Queen of Naples Queen consort of Naples

Mary of Hungary, of the Árpád dynasty, was Queen consort of the Kingdom of Naples. She was a daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and his wife Elizabeth the Cuman. Mary served as Regent in Provence in 1290–1294 and in Naples in 1295–96, 1296–98, and 1302, during the absences of her consort.

Simonida Queen consort of Serbia

Simonida Nemanjić, born Simonis Palaiologina, was a Byzantine princess and queen consort of the Kingdom of Serbia as the fourth wife of Serbian king Stefan Milutin. She was a daughter of the Byzantine Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos and Irene of Montferrat. In Medieval Serbia Simonida is best remembered as a patron of the Arts, Music and Literature.

Anna of Savoy Byzantine Empress consort

Anna of Savoy, born Giovanna (1306–1365) was a Byzantine Empress consort, as the second spouse of Andronikos III Palaiologos. She served as regent during the minority of her son from 1341 until 1347.

Catherine of Hungary, Queen of Serbia Queen consort of Serbia

Catherine of Hungary was the second daughter of Stephen V of Hungary and his wife Queen Elizabeth, daughter of Seyhan, chieftain of the Cumans. Catherine became Queen consort of Serbia by her marriage to Stephen Dragutin of Serbia.

John Palaiologos was a member of the reigning Palaiologos dynasty of the Byzantine Empire, who served as governor of Thessalonica.

Constantine Palaiologos (son of Andronikos II)

Constantine Doukas Komnenos Palaiologos was a Byzantine prince of the Palaiologos dynasty, who received the supreme title of Despot and served as provincial governor.

Demetrios Angelos Doukas Palaiologos was a son of the Byzantine Emperor Andronikos II Palaiologos and his second wife, Irene of Montferrat.

References

  1. Mortimer, Ian (2010). The Greatest Traitor. Vintage Books. p. 109. ISBN   9780099552222.
  2. Kohn, George Childs (2013). Dictionary of Wars. Routledge. p. 84. ISBN   9781135954949.
  3. "Italian". The University of Edinburgh. Archived from the original on January 16, 2018. Retrieved January 15, 2018.