1398

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1398 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1398
MCCCXCVIII
Ab urbe condita 2151
Armenian calendar 847
ԹՎ ՊԽԷ
Assyrian calendar 6148
Balinese saka calendar 1319–1320
Bengali calendar 805
Berber calendar 2348
English Regnal year 21  Ric. 2   22  Ric. 2
Buddhist calendar 1942
Burmese calendar 760
Byzantine calendar 6906–6907
Chinese calendar 丁丑(Fire  Ox)
4094 or 4034
     to 
戊寅年 (Earth  Tiger)
4095 or 4035
Coptic calendar 1114–1115
Discordian calendar 2564
Ethiopian calendar 1390–1391
Hebrew calendar 5158–5159
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1454–1455
 - Shaka Samvat 1319–1320
 - Kali Yuga 4498–4499
Holocene calendar 11398
Igbo calendar 398–399
Iranian calendar 776–777
Islamic calendar 800–801
Japanese calendar Ōei 5
(応永5年)
Javanese calendar 1312–1313
Julian calendar 1398
MCCCXCVIII
Korean calendar 3731
Minguo calendar 514 before ROC
民前514年
Nanakshahi calendar −70
Thai solar calendar 1940–1941
Tibetan calendar 阴火牛年
(female Fire-Ox)
1524 or 1143 or 371
     to 
阳土虎年
(male Earth-Tiger)
1525 or 1144 or 372

Year 1398 ( MCCCXCVIII ) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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Johannes Gutenberg

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14th century Century

As a means of recording the passage of time, the 14th century was a century lasting from January 1, 1301, to December 31, 1400. It is estimated that the century witnessed the death of more than 45 million lives from political and natural disasters in both Europe and the Mongol Empire. West Africa and the Indian Subcontinent experienced economic growth and prosperity.

Year 1402 (MCDII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

The 1360s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1360, and ended on December 31, 1369.

Year 1400 (MCD) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The year 1400 was not a leap year in the Proleptic Gregorian Calendar.

The 1410s decade ran from January 1, 1410, to December 31, 1419.

The 1390s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1390, and ended on December 31, 1399.

The 1370s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1370, and ended on December 31, 1379.

Year 1368 (MCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1369 (MCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1375 (MCCCLXXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1392 (MCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1390 (MCCCXC) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Taejo of Joseon the first king of Joseon Dynasty in Korean history

Taejo of Joseon, born 李成桂 was the founder and the first king of the Joseon dynasty of Korea. After ascension to the throne, he changed his name to 李旦. He reigned from 1392 to 1398, and was the main figure in the overthrowing of the Goryeo Dynasty.

Jeongjong of Joseon, born Yi Bang-gwa, whose changed name is Yi Gyeong, was the second king of Joseon Dynasty (1399–1400). He was the second son of King Taejo of Joseon, the founder and first king of the dynasty.

1400s (decade) decade

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

This article explains the history of the Joseon dynasty, which ruled Korea from 1392 to 1897.

References

  1. BBC History - Historic Figures - King Richard II. Accessed 1 May 2013
  2. Rypka, J. (1960). "Burhãn al-Dīn". In Gibb, H. A. R.; Kramers, J. H.; Lévi-Provençal, E.; Schacht, J.; Lewis, B. & Pellat, Ch. (eds.). The Encyclopaedia of Islam, New Edition, Volume I: A–B. Leiden: E. J. Brill. pp. 1327–1328. doi:10.1163/1573-3912_islam_SIM_1543. OCLC   495469456.