1397

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1397 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1397
MCCCXCVII
Ab urbe condita 2150
Armenian calendar 846
ԹՎ ՊԽԶ
Assyrian calendar 6147
Balinese saka calendar 1318–1319
Bengali calendar 804
Berber calendar 2347
English Regnal year 20  Ric. 2   21  Ric. 2
Buddhist calendar 1941
Burmese calendar 759
Byzantine calendar 6905–6906
Chinese calendar 丙子(Fire  Rat)
4093 or 4033
     to 
丁丑年 (Fire  Ox)
4094 or 4034
Coptic calendar 1113–1114
Discordian calendar 2563
Ethiopian calendar 1389–1390
Hebrew calendar 5157–5158
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1453–1454
 - Shaka Samvat 1318–1319
 - Kali Yuga 4497–4498
Holocene calendar 11397
Igbo calendar 397–398
Iranian calendar 775–776
Islamic calendar 799–800
Japanese calendar Ōei 4
(応永4年)
Javanese calendar 1311–1312
Julian calendar 1397
MCCCXCVII
Korean calendar 3730
Minguo calendar 515 before ROC
民前515年
Nanakshahi calendar −71
Thai solar calendar 1939–1940
Tibetan calendar 阳火鼠年
(male Fire-Rat)
1523 or 1142 or 370
     to 
阴火牛年
(female Fire-Ox)
1524 or 1143 or 371

Year 1397 ( MCCCXCVII ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019, and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

Mircea I of Wallachia Ruler of Wallachia

Mircea the Elder was Voivode of Wallachia from 1386 until his death. The byname "elder" was given to him after his death in order to distinguish him from his grandson Mircea II, although some historians believe the epithet was given to him as a sign of respect by later generations. He is considered the most important Wallachian ruler during the Middle Ages and one of the great rulers of his era, and starting in the 19th century Romanian historiography has also referred to him as Mircea the Great.

Wallachia Historical and geographical region of Romania

Wallachia or Walachia is a historical and geographical region of Romania. It is situated north of the Lower Danube and south of the Southern Carpathians. Wallachia is traditionally divided into two sections, Muntenia and Oltenia. Wallachia as a whole is sometimes referred to as Muntenia through identification with the larger of the two traditional sections.

Date unknown

Vidin Place in Bulgaria

Vidin is a port town on the southern bank of the Danube in north-western Bulgaria. It is close to the borders with Romania and Serbia, and is also the administrative centre of Vidin Province, as well as of the Metropolitan of Vidin.

Bulgaria country in Southeast Europe

Bulgaria, officially the Republic of Bulgaria, is a country in Southeast Europe. It is bordered by Romania to the north, Serbia and North Macedonia to the west, Greece and Turkey to the south, and the Black Sea to the east. The capital and largest city is Sofia; other major cities are Plovdiv, Varna and Burgas. With a territory of 110,994 square kilometres (42,855 sq mi), Bulgaria is Europe's 16th-largest country.

Ivan Sratsimir of Bulgaria Bulgarian monarch.

Ivan Sratsimir or Ivan Stratsimir was emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria in Vidin from 1356 to 1396. He was born in 1324 or 1325, and he died in or after 1397. Despite being the eldest surviving son of Ivan Alexander, Ivan Sratsimir was disinherited in favour of his half-brother Ivan Shishman and proclaimed himself emperor in Vidin. When the Hungarians attacked and occupied his domains, he received assistance from his father and the invaders were driven away.

Births

February 21 is the 52nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 313 days remain until the end of the year.

Year 1471 (MCDLXXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

May 15 is the 135th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 230 days remain until the end of the year.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1469 (MCDLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

Year 1483 (MCDLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar).

Year 1400 (MCD) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1398 (MCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1390s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1390, and ended on December 31, 1399.

Year 1385 (MCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1396 (MCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1408 (MCDVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1417 (MCDXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1428 (MCDXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1272 (MCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent English nobleman

Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent was an English nobleman and a councillor of his half-brother, King Richard II of England.

Thomas Holland, 1st Duke of Surrey, 3rd Earl of Kent, 4th Baron Holland, KG, Earl Marshal was an English nobleman.

Events from the 1390s in England.

Alice FitzAlan, Countess of Kent English countess

Alice Holland, Countess of Kent, LG, formerly Lady Alice Fitzalan, was an English noblewoman, a daughter of the 10th Earl of Arundel, and the wife of the 2nd Earl of Kent, the half-brother of King Richard II. As the maternal grandmother of Anne de Mortimer, she was an ancestor of King Edward IV and King Richard III, as well as King Henry VII and the Tudor dynasty through her daughter Margaret Holland. She was also the maternal grandmother of Joan Beaufort, Queen of Scots.

References

  1. "Islamic Culture and the Medical Arts Hospitals". U.S. National Library of Medicine. Retrieved June 17, 2018.
  2. "Nicholas V | Vatican Library & Dum Diversas". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 6, 2019.