1422

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1422 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1422
MCDXXII
Ab urbe condita 2175
Armenian calendar 871
ԹՎ ՊՀԱ
Assyrian calendar 6172
Balinese saka calendar 1343–1344
Bengali calendar 829
Berber calendar 2372
English Regnal year 9  Hen. 5   1  Hen. 6
Buddhist calendar 1966
Burmese calendar 784
Byzantine calendar 6930–6931
Chinese calendar 辛丑(Metal  Ox)
4118 or 4058
     to 
壬寅年 (Water  Tiger)
4119 or 4059
Coptic calendar 1138–1139
Discordian calendar 2588
Ethiopian calendar 1414–1415
Hebrew calendar 5182–5183
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1478–1479
 - Shaka Samvat 1343–1344
 - Kali Yuga 4522–4523
Holocene calendar 11422
Igbo calendar 422–423
Iranian calendar 800–801
Islamic calendar 824–826
Japanese calendar Ōei 29
(応永29年)
Javanese calendar 1336–1337
Julian calendar 1422
MCDXXII
Korean calendar 3755
Minguo calendar 490 before ROC
民前490年
Nanakshahi calendar −46
Thai solar calendar 1964–1965
Tibetan calendar 阴金牛年
(female Iron-Ox)
1548 or 1167 or 395
     to 
阳水虎年
(male Water-Tiger)
1549 or 1168 or 396

Year 1422 ( MCDXXII ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

January 10 is the 10th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 355 days remain until the end of the year.

Hussite Wars 15th-century wars fought between Christian Hussites and Catholic forces

The Hussite Wars, also called the Bohemian Wars or the Hussite Revolution, were fought between the Christian Hussites and the combined Christian Catholic forces of Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, the Papacy and various European monarchs loyal to the Catholic Church, as well as among various Hussite factions themselves. After initial clashes, the Utraquists changed sides in 1423 to fight alongside Roman Catholics and opposed the Taborites and other Hussite spinoffs. These wars lasted from 1419 to approximately 1434.

Battle of Deutschbrod battle

The Battle of Deutschbrod or Německý Brod took place on 10 January 1422, in Deutschbrod, Bohemia, during the Hussite Wars. Led by Jan Žižka, the Hussites besieged 2,000 Royalist crusaders. The Roman Catholic crusaders were no match for the Hussites and Deutschbrod was quickly taken and sacked. A Royalist arsenal and supply train, numbering some 500 wagons, was captured, one of the largest amounts of loot that the Hussites would take throughout the whole war.

Undated

Ottoman Empire Former empire in Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa

The Ottoman Empire, historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the 1453 conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Constantine II, allegedly ruled as emperor (tsar) of Bulgaria from 1397 to 1422. He was born in the early 1370s, and died in exile at the Serbian court on 17 September 1422. Constantine II claimed the title Emperor of Bulgaria and was accepted as such by foreign governments, but he is often omitted from listings of rulers of Bulgaria.

Bulgarian Empire Medieval empire in South-Eastern Europe

In the medieval history of Europe, Bulgaria's status as the Bulgarian Empire, wherein it acted as a key regional power occurred in two distinct periods: between the seventh and eleventh centuries, and again between the twelfth and fourteenth centuries. The two "Bulgarian Empires" are not treated as separate entities, but rather as one state restored after a period of Byzantine rule over its territory. Bulgaria is one of the few historic states and nations whose economy and society were never based on slavery, and slavery never played an important role in Bulgarian statehood development and wealth.

Births

March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 298 days remain until the end of the year.

Jacopo Piccolomini-Ammannati, or Giacomo Piccolomini was an Italian Renaissance cardinal and humanist.

Year 1479 (MCDLXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar).

Deaths

March 9 is the 68th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 297 days remain until the end of the year.

Jan Želivský Czech priest

Jan Želivský was a prominent Czech priest during the Hussite Reformation.

1380 Year

Year 1380 (MCCCLXXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

1688 Year

1688 (MDCLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar, the 1688th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 688th year of the 2nd millennium, the 88th year of the 17th century, and the 9th year of the 1680s decade. As of the start of 1688, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

The 1430s decade ran from January 1, 1430, to December 31, 1439.

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1595th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 595th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1543 Year

Year 1543 (MDXLIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. It is one of the years sometimes referred to as an "Annus mirabilis" because of its significant publications in science, considered the start of the scientific revolution.

The 1360s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1360, and ended on December 31, 1369.

1394 Year

Year 1394 (MCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1431 (MCDXXXI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1461 (MCDLXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1420s decade ran from January 1, 1420, to December 31, 1429.

1501 Year

Year 1501 (MDI) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1467 Year

Year 1467 (MCDLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1362 (MCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1369 (MCCCLXIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1390 (MCCCXC) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1397 (MCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1430 Year

Year 1430 (MCDXXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1435 Year

Year 1435 (MCDXXXV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Events from the 1420s in England.

References

  1. Szarmach, Paul E.; Tavormina, M. Teresa; Rosenthal, Joel T. (2017). Routledge Revivals: Medieval England (1998): An Encyclopedia. Taylor & Francis. p. 348. ISBN   9781351666374.
  2. "Charles VI | king of France". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved May 6, 2019.