August 24

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August 24 is the 236th day of the year(237th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. 129 days remain until the end of the year.

A leap year is a calendar year containing an additional day added to keep the calendar year synchronized with the astronomical or seasonal year. Because seasons and astronomical events do not repeat in a whole number of days, calendars that have the same number of days in each year drift over time with respect to the event that the year is supposed to track. By inserting an additional day or month into the year, the drift can be corrected. A year that is not a leap year is called a common year.

The Gregorian calendar is the calendar used in most of the world. It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October 1582. The calendar spaces leap years to make the average year 365.2425 days long, approximating the 365.2422-day tropical year that is determined by the Earth's revolution around the Sun. The rule for leap years is:

Every year that is exactly divisible by four is a leap year, except for years that are exactly divisible by 100, but these centurial years are leap years if they are exactly divisible by 400. For example, the years 1700, 1800, and 1900 are not leap years, but the year 2000 is.

Contents

Events

Gratian Roman emperor

Gratian was Roman emperor from 367 to 383. The eldest son of Valentinian I, Gratian accompanied, during his youth, his father on several campaigns along the Rhine and Danube frontiers. Upon the death of Valentinian in 375, Gratian's brother Valentinian II was declared emperor by his father's soldiers. In 378, Gratian's generals won a decisive victory over the Lentienses, a branch of the Alamanni, at the Battle of Argentovaria. Gratian subsequently led a campaign across the Rhine, the last emperor to do so, and attacked the Lentienses, forcing the tribe to surrender. That same year, his uncle Valens was killed in the Battle of Adrianople against the Goths. He favoured Christianity over traditional Roman religion, refusing the office of Pontifex maximus and removing the Altar of Victory from the Roman Senate.

Roman emperor ruler of the Roman Empire

The Roman emperor was the ruler of the Roman Empire during the imperial period. The emperors used a variety of different titles throughout history. Often when a given Roman is described as becoming "emperor" in English, it reflects his taking of the title Augustus or Caesar. Another title often used was imperator, originally a military honorific. Early Emperors also used the title Princeps Civitatis. Emperors frequently amassed republican titles, notably princeps senatus, consul and pontifex maximus.

Valentinian I Roman emperor

Valentinian I, also known as Valentinian the Great, was Roman emperor from 364 to 375. Upon becoming emperor he made his brother Valens his co-emperor, giving him rule of the eastern provinces while Valentinian retained the west.

Births

1016 Year

Year 1016 (MXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Fujiwara no Genshi, born Princess Genshi (嫄子女王), was an empress consort (chūgū) of Emperor Go-Suzaku of Japan. She was the adopted daughter of Fujiwara no Yorimichi, and biological daughter of Imperial Prince Atsuyasu (敦康親王).

Year 1113 (MCXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

691 Year

Year 691 (DCXCI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 691 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

Fu Youyi (傅遊藝), known as Wu Youyi (武遊藝) during the reign of Wu Zetian, was an official of the Chinese dynasty Tang Dynasty and Wu Zetian's Zhou Dynasty, serving as a chancellor briefly after she took the throne in 690. He was known for being the first official to publicly petition her to take the throne and establish her own dynasty, and was awarded for his public stance by being promoted within a year from a low level official to the upper echelon of the imperial administration. In 691, however, he was accused of having even greater ambitions and arrested; he committed suicide.

842 Year

Year 842 (DCCCXLII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Holidays and observances

Abbán saint

Abbán moccu Corbmaic, also Eibbán or Moabba, is a saint in Irish tradition. He was associated, first and foremost, with Mag Arnaide and with Cell Abbáin. His cult was, however, also connected to other churches elsewhere in Ireland, notably that of his alleged sister Gobnait.

Aurea of Ostia Patron saint of Ostia

Saint Aurea of Ostia is venerated as the patron saint of Ostia. According to one scholar, “[a]lthough the acta of Saint Aurea are pious fiction, she was a genuine martyr with a very early cultus at Ostia.”

Bartholomew the Apostle Christian Apostle

Bartholomew was one of the twelve apostles of Jesus. He has also been identified as Nathanael or Nathaniel, who appears in the Gospel of John when introduced to Jesus by Philip ,*(John 1:43-51) although many modern commentators reject the identification of Nathanael with Bartholomew.

Related Research Articles

April 6 is the 96th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 269 days remain until the end of the year.

August 25 is the 237th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 128 days remain until the end of the year.

August 10 is the 222nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 143 days remain until the end of the year.

December 5 is the 339th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 26 days remain until the end of the year.

December 24 is the 358th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. Seven days remain until the end of the year.

December 9 is the 343rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 22 days remain until the end of the year.

July 10 is the 191st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 174 days remain until the end of the year.

June 21 is the 172nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 193 days remain until the end of the year.

November 5 is the 309th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 56 days remain until the end of the year.

November 19 is the 323rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 42 days remain until the end of the year.

November 8 is the 312th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 53 days remain until the end of the year.

November 3 is the 307th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 58 days remain until the end of the year.

October 10 is the 283rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 82 days remain until the end of the year.

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

October 18 is the 291st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 74 days remain until the end of the year.

October 23 is the 296th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 69 days remain until the end of the year.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 108 days remain until the end of the year.

September 5 is the 248th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 117 days remain until the end of the year.

September 13 is the 256th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 109 days remain until the end of the year.

September 9 is the 252nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 113 days remain until the end of the year.

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