927

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Millennium: 1st millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
927 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 927
CMXXVII
Ab urbe condita 1680
Armenian calendar 376
ԹՎ ՅՀԶ
Assyrian calendar 5677
Balinese saka calendar 848–849
Bengali calendar 334
Berber calendar 1877
Buddhist calendar 1471
Burmese calendar 289
Byzantine calendar 6435–6436
Chinese calendar 丙戌(Fire  Dog)
3623 or 3563
     to 
丁亥年 (Fire  Pig)
3624 or 3564
Coptic calendar 643–644
Discordian calendar 2093
Ethiopian calendar 919–920
Hebrew calendar 4687–4688
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 983–984
 - Shaka Samvat 848–849
 - Kali Yuga 4027–4028
Holocene calendar 10927
Iranian calendar 305–306
Islamic calendar 314–315
Japanese calendar Enchō 5
(延長5年)
Javanese calendar 826–827
Julian calendar 927
CMXXVII
Korean calendar 3260
Minguo calendar 985 before ROC
民前985年
Nanakshahi calendar −541
Seleucid era 1238/1239 AG
Thai solar calendar 1469–1470
Tibetan calendar 阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
1053 or 672 or −100
     to 
阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1054 or 673 or −99
Tsar Simeon I of Bulgaria on his throne. Car Simeon Bulharsky - Alfons Mucha.jpg
Tsar Simeon I of Bulgaria on his throne.

Year 927 ( CMXXVII ) was a common year starting on Monday (link 'will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013 and 2019 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

By place

Europe

May 27 is the 147th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 218 days remaining until the end of the year.

Simeon I of Bulgaria King of the Bulgarians

SimeonI the Great ruled over Bulgaria from 893 to 927, during the First Bulgarian Empire. Simeon's successful campaigns against the Byzantines, Magyars and Serbs led Bulgaria to its greatest territorial expansion ever, making it the most powerful state in contemporary Eastern Europe. His reign was also a period of unmatched cultural prosperity and enlightenment later deemed the Golden Age of Bulgarian culture.

Tsar title given to a male monarch in Russia, Bulgaria and Serbia

Tsar, also spelled czar, or tzar, is a title used to designate East and South Slavic monarchs or supreme rulers of Eastern Europe, originally Bulgarian monarchs from 10th century onwards. As a system of government in the Tsardom of Russia and the Russian Empire, it is known as Tsarist autocracy, or Tsarism. The term is derived from the Latin word Caesar, which was intended to mean "Emperor" in the European medieval sense of the term—a ruler with the same rank as a Roman emperor, holding it by the approval of another emperor or a supreme ecclesiastical official —but was usually considered by western Europeans to be equivalent to king, or to be somewhat in between a royal and imperial rank.

Asia

Later Baekje Former country

Hubaekje or Later Baekje was one of the Later Three Kingdoms of Korea, along with Hugoguryeo and Silla. It was officially founded by the disaffected Silla general Gyeon Hwon in 900, and fell to Wang Geon's Goryeo army in 936. Its capital was at Jeonju, in present-day North Jeolla province. Most of information now available about the kingdom comes from the accounts found in the Samguk Yusa and Samguk Sagi, which largely coincide.

Later Three Kingdoms period of Korean history (892–936), during which the southern Korean peninsula was fragmented into three states (Taebong, Hubaekje, and Silla), until they were eventually reunified by Goryeo

The Later Three Kingdoms of Korea (892–936) consisted of Silla, Hubaekje and Hugoguryeo. The latter two claimed heirs to the earlier Three Kingdoms of Korea, which had been united by Silla. This period arose out of national unrest during the reign of Queen Jinseong of Silla, and usually refers to the era between the founding of Hubaekje by Gyeon Hwon to the time Goryeo unified the peninsula.

Korea Region in East Asia

Korea is a region in East Asia. Since 1948, it has been divided between two distinct sovereign states: North Korea and South Korea. Korea consists of the Korean Peninsula, Jeju Island, and several minor islands near the peninsula. Korea is bordered by China to the northwest, Russia to the northeast, and neighbours Japan to the east by the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan.

By topic

Religion

Bulgarian Orthodox Church national church

The Bulgarian Orthodox Church is an autocephalous Orthodox Church. It is the oldest Slavic Orthodox Church with some 6 million members in the Republic of Bulgaria and between 1.5 and 2.0 million members in a number of European countries, the Americas, Australia, New Zealand and Asia. It was recognized as an independent Church by the Patriarchate of Constantinople in AD 870, becoming Patriarchate in 918/919.

September 14 is the 257th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 108 days remaining until the end of the year.

Cele Dabhaill mac Scannal was the Abbot of Banagher.

Births

March 21 is the 80th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 285 days remaining until the end of the year.

Emperor Taizu of Song Founding emperor of the Song Dynasty

Emperor Taizu of Song personal name Zhao Kuangyin, courtesy name Yuanlang, was the founder and first emperor of the Song dynasty in China. He reigned from 960 until his death in 976. Formerly a distinguished military general of the Later Zhou dynasty, Emperor Taizu came to power after staging a coup d'état and forcing Emperor Gong, the last Later Zhou ruler, to abdicate the throne in his favour.

Song dynasty Chinese historical period

The Song dynasty was an era of Chinese history that began in 960 and lasted until 1279. The dynasty was founded by Emperor Taizu of Song following his usurpation of the throne of the Later Zhou, ending the Five Dynasties and Ten Kingdoms period. The Song often came into conflict with the contemporary Liao and Western Xia dynasties in the north. It was eventually conquered by the Mongol-led Yuan dynasty. The Song government was the first in world history to issue banknotes or true paper money nationally and the first Chinese government to establish a permanent standing navy. This dynasty also saw the first known use of gunpowder, as well as the first discernment of true north using a compass.

Deaths

January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 352 days remaining until the end of the year.

Saint Berno of Cluny or Berno of Baume was the first abbot of Cluny from its foundation in 909 until he died in 927. He began the tradition of the Cluniac reforms which his successors spread across Europe.

January 14 is the 14th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 351 days remaining until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

867 Year

Year 867 (DCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 910s decade ran from January 1, 910, to December 31, 919.

The 920s decade ran from January 1, 920, to December 31, 929.

Year 864 (DCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

857 Year

Year 857 (DCCCLVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

822 Year

Year 822 (DCCCXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

935 Year

Year 935 (CMXXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

839 Year

Year 839 (DCCCXXXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

865 Year

Year 865 (DCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

663 Year

Year 663 (DCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. The denomination 663 for this year has been used since the early medieval period, when the Anno Domini calendar era became the prevalent method in Europe for naming years.

931 Year

Year 931 (CMXXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

926 Year

Year 926 (CMXXVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

924 Year

Year 924 (CMXXIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

896 Year

Year 896 (DCCCXCVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

917 Year

Year 917 (CMXVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

895 Year

Year 895 (DCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

894 Year

Year 894 (DCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

892 Year

Year 892 (DCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

936 Year

Year 936 (CMXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

934 Year

Year 934 (CMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. John V.A. Fine, Jr (1991). The Early Medieval Balkans: A Critical Survey from the Sixth to the Late Twelfth Century, p. 161. ISBN   978-0-472-08149-3.
  2. Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 42–47. ISBN   978-0-7126-5616-0.