1349

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1349 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1349
MCCCXLIX
Ab urbe condita 2102
Armenian calendar 798
ԹՎ ՉՂԸ
Assyrian calendar 6099
Balinese saka calendar 1270–1271
Bengali calendar 756
Berber calendar 2299
English Regnal year 22  Edw. 3   23  Edw. 3
Buddhist calendar 1893
Burmese calendar 711
Byzantine calendar 6857–6858
Chinese calendar 戊子(Earth  Rat)
4045 or 3985
     to 
己丑年 (Earth  Ox)
4046 or 3986
Coptic calendar 1065–1066
Discordian calendar 2515
Ethiopian calendar 1341–1342
Hebrew calendar 5109–5110
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1405–1406
 - Shaka Samvat 1270–1271
 - Kali Yuga 4449–4450
Holocene calendar 11349
Igbo calendar 349–350
Iranian calendar 727–728
Islamic calendar 749–750
Japanese calendar Jōwa 5
(貞和5年)
Javanese calendar 1261–1262
Julian calendar 1349
MCCCXLIX
Korean calendar 3682
Minguo calendar 563 before ROC
民前563年
Nanakshahi calendar −119
Thai solar calendar 1891–1892
Tibetan calendar 阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1475 or 1094 or 322
     to 
阴土牛年
(female Earth-Ox)
1476 or 1095 or 323

Year 1349 ( MCCCXLIX ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

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1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

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1264 1264

Year 1264 (MCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Charles V of France King of France

Charles V, called the Wise, was King of France from 1364 to his death. His reign marked an early high point for France during the Hundred Years' War, with his armies recovering much of the territory held by the English, and successfully reversed the military losses of his predecessors.

Philip VI of France King of France, the first of Valois

Philip VI, called the Fortunate and of Valois, was the first King of France from the House of Valois. He reigned from 1328 until his death.

Louis X of France King of France

Louis X, called the Quarrelsome, the Headstrong, or the Stubborn, was King of France from 1314 to 1316, succeeding his father Philip IV. After the death of his mother, Joan I of Navarre, he was also King of Navarre as Louis I from 1305 until his death in 1316.

Joan of Kent 14th-century English noblewoman

Joan, Countess of Kent, known to history as The Fair Maid of Kent, was the mother of King Richard II of England, whom she bore to her third husband Edward the Black Prince, son and heir apparent of King Edward III. Although the French chronicler Jean Froissart called her "the most beautiful woman in all the realm of England, and the most loving", the appellation "Fair Maid of Kent" does not appear to be contemporary. Joan inherited the titles 4th Countess of Kent and 5th Baroness Wake of Liddell after the death of her brother, John, 3rd Earl of Kent, in 1352.

Philip III of Navarre King of Navarre

Philip III, called the Noble or the Wise, was King of Navarre from 1328 until his death. He was born a minor member of the French royal family but gained prominence when the Capetian main line went extinct, as he and his wife and cousin, Joan II of Navarre, acquired the Iberian kingdom and a number of French fiefs.

This timeline of antisemitism chronicles the facts of antisemitism, hostile actions or discrimination against Jews as a religious or ethnic group. It includes events in the history of antisemitic thought, actions taken to combat or relieve the effects of antisemitism, and events that affected the prevalence of antisemitism in later years. The history of antisemitism can be traced from ancient times to the present day.

Events from the 1340s in England

Catherine de Bourbon Regent of Béarn

Catherine de Bourbon was a Navarrese princess. She was the daughter of Queen Joan III and King Anthony of Navarre. She ruled the principality of Béarn in the name of her brother, King Henry III of Navarre, from 1576 until 1596.

The Erfurt massacre refers to the massacre of the Jewish community in Erfurt, Germany, on March 21, 1349. Accounts of the number of Jews killed in the massacre vary widely from between 100 and up to 3000. Some Jews set fire to their homes and possessions and perished in the flames before they could be lynched. The many Black Death persecutions and massacres that occurred in France and Germany at that time were sometimes in response to accusations that the Jews were responsible for outbreaks of the Black Death, and other times justified with the belief that killing the local Jews would prevent the spread of the Black Death to that locale. Although these beliefs, and the accompanying massacres, were frequently encouraged by local bishops or itinerant Flagellants, the Catholic Church, including Pope Clement VI under whom the Flagellants and the Black Death began, and his successor, Innocent VI, were firmly against it. In a papal bull condemning the Flagellant movement in late 1349, Pope Clement VI criticized their "shedding the blood of Jews". Erfurt later suffered the ravages of the Black Plague, where over 16,000 residents died during a ten-week period in 1350.

Jewish persecutions during the Black Death Series of violent attacks on Jewish communities from 1348 to 1351

The Black Death persecutions and massacres were a series of violent attacks on Jewish communities blamed for outbreaks of the Black Death in Europe from 1348 to 1351.

References

  1. "Jewish History Sourcebook: The Black Death and the Jews 1348-1349 CE". New York: Fordham University . Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  2. "This Month in Jewish History - Shvat". Torahtots.com. Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  3. Lemaître, Frédéric (September 19, 2011). "Erfurt, ses juifs et l'UNESCO". Le Monde (in French). Paris. Retrieved September 19, 2011.
  4. "This Month in Jewish History - Sivan". Torahtots.com. Retrieved July 20, 2017.
  5. Benedictow, Ole Jørgen (2006). The Black Death, 1346-1353: The Complete History. Boydell Press. pp. 154–155.