1297

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1297 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1297
MCCXCVII
Ab urbe condita 2050
Armenian calendar 746
ԹՎ ՉԽԶ
Assyrian calendar 6047
Balinese saka calendar 1218–1219
Bengali calendar 704
Berber calendar 2247
English Regnal year 25  Edw. 1   26  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1841
Burmese calendar 659
Byzantine calendar 6805–6806
Chinese calendar 丙申(Fire  Monkey)
3993 or 3933
     to 
丁酉年 (Fire  Rooster)
3994 or 3934
Coptic calendar 1013–1014
Discordian calendar 2463
Ethiopian calendar 1289–1290
Hebrew calendar 5057–5058
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1353–1354
 - Shaka Samvat 1218–1219
 - Kali Yuga 4397–4398
Holocene calendar 11297
Igbo calendar 297–298
Iranian calendar 675–676
Islamic calendar 696–697
Japanese calendar Einin 5
(永仁5年)
Javanese calendar 1208–1209
Julian calendar 1297
MCCXCVII
Korean calendar 3630
Minguo calendar 615 before ROC
民前615年
Nanakshahi calendar −171
Thai solar calendar 1839–1840
Tibetan calendar 阳火猴年
(male Fire-Monkey)
1423 or 1042 or 270
     to 
阴火鸡年
(female Fire-Rooster)
1424 or 1043 or 271

Year 1297 ( MCCXCVII ) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Tuesday is any non-leap year that begins on Tuesday, 1 January, and ends on Tuesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is F. The current year, 2019, is a common year starting on Tuesday in the Gregorian calendar. The last such year was 2013 and the next such year will be 2030, or, likewise, 2014 and 2025 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in September and December. Leap years starting on Monday share this characteristic. From July of the year that precedes this year until September in this type of year is the longest period that occurs without a Friday the 13th. Leap years starting on Saturday share this characteristic, from August of the common year that precedes it to October in that type of year.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

January 8 is the eighth day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 357 days remaining until the end of the year.

François Grimaldi Monegasque noble

Francesco Grimaldi, called il Malizia, was the Genoese leader of the Guelphs who captured the Rock of Monaco on the night of 8 January 1297. He was the son of Guglielmo Grimaldi by his wife Giacobina or Giacoba, a Genoese noble.

Monaco principality in Western Europe

Monaco, officially the Principality of Monaco, is a sovereign city-state, country, and microstate on the French Riviera in Western Europe. France borders the country on three sides while the other side borders the Mediterranean Sea.

Date unknown

Louis IX of France 13th-century King of France

Louis IX, commonly known as Saint Louis, was King of France, the ninth from the House of Capet, and is a canonized Catholic and Anglican saint. Louis was crowned in Reims at the age of 12, following the death of his father Louis VIII the Lion, although his mother, Blanche of Castile, ruled the kingdom until he reached maturity. During Louis' childhood, Blanche dealt with the opposition of rebellious vassals and put an end to the Albigensian Crusade which had started 20 years earlier.

The Treaty of Anagni was an accord between the Pope Boniface VIII, James II of Aragon, Philip IV of France, Charles II of Naples, and James II of Majorca. It was signed on 20 June 1295 at Anagni, in central Italy. The chief purpose was to confirm the Treaty of Tarascon of 1291, which ended the Aragonese Crusade. It also dealt with finding a diplomatic solution to the conquest of Sicily by Peter III of Aragón in 1285.

Kingdom of Aragon medieval and early modern kingdom in the Iberian Peninsula

The Kingdom of Aragon was a medieval and early modern kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula, corresponding to the modern-day autonomous community of Aragon, in Spain. It should not be confused with the larger Crown of Aragon, that also included other territories — the Principality of Catalonia, the Kingdom of Valencia, the Kingdom of Majorca, and other possessions that are now part of France, Italy, and Greece — that were also under the rule of the King of Aragon, but were administered separately from the Kingdom of Aragon.

Births

March 25 is the 84th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 281 days remaining until the end of the year.

Arnošt of Pardubice Roman Catholic archbishop

Arnošt z Pardubic was the first Archbishop of Prague. He was also an advisor and diplomat to Emperor Charles IV.

1364 Year

Year 1364 (MCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Year 1465 (MCDLXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1506 Year

Year 1506 (MDVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1537 Year

Year 1537 (MDXXXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1147 (MCXLVII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1320 (MCCCXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1338 (MCCCXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1371 (MCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1544 Year

1544 (MDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1544th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 544th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1540s decade. As of the start of 1544, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

1505 Year

Year 1505 (MDV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1489 (MCDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1347 (MCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Sunday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar. 1347 (MCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1347th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 347th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 14th century, and the 8th year of the 1340s decade. As of the start of 1347, the Gregorian calendar was 8 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

Year 1355 (MCCCLV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1383 (MCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1384 (MCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1321 (MCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1324 (MCCCXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1332 (MCCCXXXII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1298 (MCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1175 (MCLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Maire Vigueur, Jean-Claude (2010). L'autre Rome. Une histoire des Romains a l'époque communale (XIIe-XIVe siècle). Paris: Tallandier. p. 241. ISBN   978-2-84734-719-7. Archived from the original on March 3, 2012. Retrieved 2012-02-29.
  2. "History of the Portuguese Water Dog", Kathryn Braund and Deyanne Farrell Miller, The Complete Portuguese Water Dog, 1986, DeLeao.