1274

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1274 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1274
MCCLXXIV
Ab urbe condita 2027
Armenian calendar 723
ԹՎ ՉԻԳ
Assyrian calendar 6024
Balinese saka calendar 1195–1196
Bengali calendar 681
Berber calendar 2224
English Regnal year 2  Edw. 1   3  Edw. 1
Buddhist calendar 1818
Burmese calendar 636
Byzantine calendar 6782–6783
Chinese calendar 癸酉(Water  Rooster)
3970 or 3910
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
3971 or 3911
Coptic calendar 990–991
Discordian calendar 2440
Ethiopian calendar 1266–1267
Hebrew calendar 5034–5035
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1330–1331
 - Shaka Samvat 1195–1196
 - Kali Yuga 4374–4375
Holocene calendar 11274
Igbo calendar 274–275
Iranian calendar 652–653
Islamic calendar 672–673
Japanese calendar Bun'ei 11
(文永11年)
Javanese calendar 1184–1185
Julian calendar 1274
MCCLXXIV
Korean calendar 3607
Minguo calendar 638 before ROC
民前638年
Nanakshahi calendar −194
Thai solar calendar 1816–1817
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1400 or 1019 or 247
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1401 or 1020 or 248

Year 1274 ( MCCLXXIV ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019, and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Africa

Ceuta Autonomous city in Spain

Ceuta is an 18.5 km2 Spanish autonomous city on the north coast of Africa, separated by 14 km (9 mi) from Cadiz province on the Spanish mainland by the Strait of Gibraltar and sharing a 6.4 km (4 mi) land border with M'diq-Fnideq Prefecture in the Kingdom of Morocco. It lies along the boundary between the Mediterranean Sea and the Atlantic Ocean and is one of nine populated Spanish territories in Africa and, along with Melilla, one of two populated territories on mainland Africa. It was part of Cádiz province until 14 March 1995 when both Ceuta and Melilla's Statutes of Autonomy were passed, the latter having been part of Málaga province.

Asia

Japan

October 5 is the 278th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 87 days remain until the end of the year.

November 20 is the 324th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 41 days remain until the end of the year.

Kublai Khan founding emperor of the Yuan Dynasty, grandson of Genghis Khan

Kublai was the fifth Khagan of the Mongol Empire, reigning from 1260 to 1294. He also founded the Yuan dynasty in China as a conquest dynasty in 1271, and ruled as the first Yuan emperor until his death in 1294.

Europe

May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 238 days remain until the end of the year.

Holy Land Term used by Jews, Christians, and Muslims to describe the Land of Israel and Palestine

The Holy Land is an area roughly located between the Jordan River and the Mediterranean Sea that also includes the Eastern Bank of the Jordan River. Traditionally, it is synonymous both with the biblical Land of Israel and with the region of Palestine. The term "Holy Land" usually refers to a territory roughly corresponding to the modern State of Israel, the Palestinian territories, western Jordan, and parts of southern Lebanon and of southwestern Syria. Jews, Christians, and Muslims all regard it as holy.

Tithe religious donation

A tithe is a one-tenth part of something, paid as a contribution to a religious organization or maybe compulsory tax to government. Today, tithes are normally voluntary and paid in cash, cheques, or stocks, whereas historically tithes were required and paid in kind, such as agricultural products. Several European countries operate a formal process linked to the tax system allowing some churches to assess tithes.

England
  • August 2
    England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

    England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

    Coronation ceremony marking the formal investiture of a monarch and/or his or her consort with regal power

    A coronation is the act of placement or bestowal of a crown upon a monarch's head. The term generally also refers not only to the physical crowning but to the whole ceremony wherein the act of crowning occurs, along with the presentation of other items of regalia, marking the formal investiture of a monarch with regal power. Aside from the crowning, a coronation ceremony may comprise many other rituals such as the taking of special vows by the monarch, the investing and presentation of regalia to the monarch, and acts of homage by the new ruler's subjects and the performance of other ritual deeds of special significance to the particular nation. Western-style coronations have often included anointing the monarch with holy oil, or chrism as it is often called; the anointing ritual's religious significance follows examples found in the Bible. The monarch's consort may also be crowned, either simultaneously with the monarch or as a separate event.

    Henry III of England 13th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

    Henry III, also known as Henry of Winchester, was King of England, Lord of Ireland, and Duke of Aquitaine from 1216 until his death. The son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême, Henry assumed the throne when he was only nine in the middle of the First Barons' War. Cardinal Guala declared the war against the rebel barons to be a religious crusade and Henry's forces, led by William Marshal, defeated the rebels at the battles of Lincoln and Sandwich in 1217. Henry promised to abide by the Great Charter of 1225, which limited royal power and protected the rights of the major barons. His early rule was dominated first by Hubert de Burgh and then Peter des Roches, who re-established royal authority after the war. In 1230, the King attempted to reconquer the provinces of France that had once belonged to his father, but the invasion was a debacle. A revolt led by William Marshal's son, Richard, broke out in 1232, ending in a peace settlement negotiated by the Church.

  • The first main survey of the Hundred Rolls, an English census seen as a follow up to the Domesday Book, completed in 1086, is begun; it lasts until 1275.

August 2 is the 214th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 151 days remain until the end of the year.

Edward I of England 13th and 14th-century King of England and Duke of Aquitaine

Edward I, also known as Edward Longshanks and the Hammer of the Scots, was King of England from 1272 to 1307. Before his accession to the throne, he was commonly referred to as The Lord Edward. The first son of Henry III, Edward was involved from an early age in the political intrigues of his father's reign, which included an outright rebellion by the English barons. In 1259, he briefly sided with a baronial reform movement, supporting the Provisions of Oxford. After reconciliation with his father, however, he remained loyal throughout the subsequent armed conflict, known as the Second Barons' War. After the Battle of Lewes, Edward was hostage to the rebellious barons, but escaped after a few months and defeated the baronial leader Simon de Montfort at the Battle of Evesham in 1265. Within two years the rebellion was extinguished and, with England pacified, Edward joined the Ninth Crusade to the Holy Land. The crusade accomplished little, and Edward was on his way home in 1272 when he was informed that his father had died. Making a slow return, he reached England in 1274 and was crowned at Westminster Abbey on 19 August.

Ninth Crusade European crusade to the Holy Land in the 1270s

The Ninth Crusade was a military expedition to the Holy Land under the command of Prince Edward, the future King Edward I of England, in 1271–1272. It was an extension of the Eighth Crusade and is commonly considered the last of the Crusades to reach Holy Land before the fall of Acre in 1291.

Italy

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Related Research Articles

Year 1282 (MCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1135 (MCXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1588 Year

1588 (MDLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1588th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 588th year of the 2nd millennium, the 88th year of the 16th century, and the 9th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1588, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1277 (MCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1222 (MCCXXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1128 (MCXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1050 Year

Year 1050 (ML) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

The 1270s is the decade starting January 1, 1270, and ending December 31, 1279.

Year 1097 (MXCVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1490 (MCDXC) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1302 (MCCCII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1272 (MCCLXXII) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1218 (MCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1201 (MCCI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

1193 Year

Year 1193 (MCXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1075 Year

Year 1075 (MLXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1245 (MCCXLV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1253 (MCCLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1264 Year

Year 1264 (MCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

938 Year

Year 938 (CMXXXVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. Picard, Christophe (1997). La mer et les musulmans d'Occident VIIIe-XIIIe siècle. Paris: Presses Universitaires de France.