1319

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1319 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1319
MCCCXIX
Ab urbe condita 2072
Armenian calendar 768
ԹՎ ՉԿԸ
Assyrian calendar 6069
Balinese saka calendar 1240–1241
Bengali calendar 726
Berber calendar 2269
English Regnal year 12  Edw. 2   13  Edw. 2
Buddhist calendar 1863
Burmese calendar 681
Byzantine calendar 6827–6828
Chinese calendar 戊午(Earth  Horse)
4015 or 3955
     to 
己未年 (Earth  Goat)
4016 or 3956
Coptic calendar 1035–1036
Discordian calendar 2485
Ethiopian calendar 1311–1312
Hebrew calendar 5079–5080
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1375–1376
 - Shaka Samvat 1240–1241
 - Kali Yuga 4419–4420
Holocene calendar 11319
Igbo calendar 319–320
Iranian calendar 697–698
Islamic calendar 718–719
Japanese calendar Bunpō 3 / Gen'ō 1
(元応元年)
Javanese calendar 1230–1231
Julian calendar 1319
MCCCXIX
Korean calendar 3652
Minguo calendar 593 before ROC
民前593年
Nanakshahi calendar −149
Thai solar calendar 1861–1862
Tibetan calendar 阳土马年
(male Earth-Horse)
1445 or 1064 or 292
     to 
阴土羊年
(female Earth-Goat)
1446 or 1065 or 293

Year 1319 ( MCCCXIX ) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Monday is any non-leap year that begins on Monday, 1 January, and ends on Monday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is G. The most recent year of such kind was 2018 and the next one will be 2029 in the Gregorian calendar, or likewise, 2013, 2019, and 2030 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1900, was also a common year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar. See below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year of this type contains two Friday the 13ths in April and July. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic, but also have another in January.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

May 8 is the 128th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 237 days remain until the end of the year.

Haakon V of Norway King of Norway

Haakon V Magnusson was king of Norway from 1299 until 1319.

Magnus IV of Sweden king of Sweden including Finland, King of Norway including Iceland and Greenland, and also ruled Scania

Magnus IV was King of Sweden from 1319 to 1364, King of Norway as Magnus VII from 1319 to 1355, and ruler of Scania from 1332 to 1360. By adversaries he has been called Magnus Smek.

Births

March 20 is the 79th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 286 days remain until the end of the year. Typically the March equinox falls on this date, marking the vernal point in the Northern Hemisphere and the autumnal point in the Southern Hemisphere.

Laurence Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke English noble

Laurence de Hastings, 1st Earl of Pembroke was a Norman English nobleman and held the titles 1st Earl of Pembroke, Baron Abergavenny and Baron Hastings under Edward II of England and Edward III of England.

Year 1348 (MCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

1270 Year

Year 1270 (MCCLXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

May 19 is the 139th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 226 days remain until the end of the year.

Louis, Count of Évreux prince, the third son of King Philip III of France and his second wife Maria of Brabant, and thus a half-brother of King Philip IV of France

Louis of Évreux was a prince, the third son of King Philip III of France and his second wife Maria of Brabant, and thus a half-brother of King Philip IV of France.

Related Research Articles

The 1310s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1310, and ended on December 31, 1319.

1364 Year

Year 1364 (MCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1365 (MCCCLXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1344 (MCCCXLIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1343 (MCCCXLIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1340 (MCCCXL) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1363 (MCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1301 (MCCCI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1327 (MCCCXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1134 (MCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Haakon VI of Norway King of Norway and Sweden

Haakon VI of Norway, also known as Håkan Magnusson, was King of Norway from 1343 until his death and King of Sweden between 1362 and 1364. He is sometimes known as Haakon Magnusson the Younger to distinguish him from his great-grandfather, Haakon V.

Magnus VI of Norway King of Norway

Magnus Haakonsson was King of Norway from 1263 to 1280. One of his greatest achievements was the modernisation and nationalisation of the Norwegian law-code, after which he is known as Magnus the Law-mender. He was the first Norwegian monarch known to have used an ordinal number, although originally counting himself as "IV".

Birger, King of Sweden King of Sweden

Birger was King of Sweden from 1290 to 1318.

Dietrich, Count of Oldenburg German noble

Dietrich or Theoderic of Oldenburg was a feudal lord in Northern Germany, holding the counties of Delmenhorst and Oldenburg. He was called "Fortunatus", as he was able to secure Delmenhorst for his branch of the Oldenburgs.

Euphemia of Sweden Duchess consort of Mecklenburg

Euphemia of Sweden was a Swedish princess, spouse of Albert II, Duke of Mecklenburg, Duchess consort of Mecklenburg, heiress of Sweden and of Norway, and mother of King Albert of Sweden.

Sigurd Jonsson was a Norwegian nobleman, knight and the supreme leader of Norway during two interregnums in the mid-15th century.

House of Estridsen Wikimedia list article

The House of Estridsen, sometimes called the Estridsen or Estrith Dynasty, was the dynasty that provided the Kings of Denmark from 1047 to 1412. The dynasty is named after its ancestor Estrid Svendsdatter. The dynasty is sometimes called the Ulfinger, after Estrid's husband, Ulf the Earl. Their family coat of arms became the coat of arms of Denmark.

Knud Porse Danish noble

Knud Pedersen Porse or Canute Porse was a medieval Danish nobleman and Duke of Samsø, Duke of Halland, and Duke of Estonia.

References

  1. 1 2 Carlquist, Erik; Hogg, Peter C.; Österberg, Eva (2011). The Chronicle of Duke Erik: A Verse Epic from Medieval Sweden. Nordic Academic Press. p. 257. ISBN   9789185509577.