1385

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1385 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1385
MCCCLXXXV
Ab urbe condita 2138
Armenian calendar 834
ԹՎ ՊԼԴ
Assyrian calendar 6135
Balinese saka calendar 1306–1307
Bengali calendar 792
Berber calendar 2335
English Regnal year 8  Ric. 2   9  Ric. 2
Buddhist calendar 1929
Burmese calendar 747
Byzantine calendar 6893–6894
Chinese calendar 甲子(Wood  Rat)
4081 or 4021
     to 
乙丑年 (Wood  Ox)
4082 or 4022
Coptic calendar 1101–1102
Discordian calendar 2551
Ethiopian calendar 1377–1378
Hebrew calendar 5145–5146
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1441–1442
 - Shaka Samvat 1306–1307
 - Kali Yuga 4485–4486
Holocene calendar 11385
Igbo calendar 385–386
Iranian calendar 763–764
Islamic calendar 786–787
Japanese calendar Shitoku 2
(至徳2年)
Javanese calendar 1298–1299
Julian calendar 1385
MCCCLXXXV
Korean calendar 3718
Minguo calendar 527 before ROC
民前527年
Nanakshahi calendar −83
Thai solar calendar 1927–1928
Tibetan calendar 阳木鼠年
(male Wood-Rat)
1511 or 1130 or 358
     to 
阴木牛年
(female Wood-Ox)
1512 or 1131 or 359

Year 1385 ( MCCCLXXXV ) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Sunday is any non-leap year that begins on Sunday, 1 January, and ends on Sunday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is A. The most recent year of such kind was 2017 and the next one will be 2023 in the Gregorian calendar, or, likewise, 2018 and 2029 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Sunday, Monday or Tuesday has two Friday the 13ths. This common year contains two Friday the 13ths in January and October.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

July 17 is the 198th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 167 days remain until the end of the year.

Charles VI of France 14th/15th-century French king

Charles VI, called the Beloved and the Mad, was King of France for 42 years from 1380, until his death.

Isabeau of Bavaria

Isabeau of Bavaria was born into the House of Wittelsbach as the eldest daughter of Duke Stephen III of Bavaria-Ingolstadt and Taddea Visconti of Milan. She became Queen of France when she married King Charles VI in 1385. At age 15 or 16, Isabeau was sent to France on approval to the young French king; the couple wed three days after their first meeting.

Date unknown

Tokhtamysh Khan of the Golden Horde

Tokhtamysh a prominent khan of the Blue Horde, briefly unified the White Horde and Blue Horde subdivisions of the Golden Horde into a single state. He descended from Genghis Khan's grandson, Tuqa-Timur.

Golden Horde Mongol Khanate

The Golden Horde,Ulug Ulus was originally a Mongol and later Turkicized khanate established in the 13th century and originating as the northwestern sector of the Mongol Empire. With the fragmentation of the Mongol Empire after 1259 it became a functionally separate khanate. It is also known as the Kipchak Khanate or as the Ulus of Jochi.

Timur Turco-Mongol ruler

Timur, sometimes spelled Taimur and historically best known as Amir Timur or Tamerlane, was a Turco-Mongol Persianate conqueror. As the founder of the Timurid Empire in and around modern-day Iran and Central Asia, he became the first ruler of the Timurid dynasty. According to John Joseph Saunders, Timur was "the product of an Islamized and Iranized society", and not steppe nomadic.

Births

June 23 is the 174th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 191 days remain until the end of the year.

Stephen, Count Palatine of Simmern-Zweibrücken Count Palatine of Simmern and Zweibrücken

Stephen of Simmern-Zweibrücken was Count Palatine of Simmern and Zweibrücken from 1410 until his death in 1459.

Year 1459 (MCDLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Year 1402 (MCDII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1421 (MCDXXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1469 (MCDLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1460s decade ran from January 1, 1460, to December 31, 1469.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

1506 Year

Year 1506 (MDVI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1458 (MCDLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

The 1580s decade ran from January 1, 1580, to December 31, 1589.

Year 1382 (MCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1513 Year

Year 1513 (MDXIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1362 (MCCCLXII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1386 (MCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1387 (MCCCLXXXVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1430 Year

Year 1430 (MCDXXX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

1383–1385 Portuguese interregnum Civil war in Portugal

The 1383–1385 Portuguese interregnum was a time of civil war in Portuguese history when no crowned king reigned. It began when King Ferdinand I died without a male heir, and ended when King John I was crowned in 1385 after his victory in the Battle of Aljubarrota. Portuguese interpret this era as their earliest national resistance movement countering Castilian intervention; Robert Durand considers it the "great revealer of national consciousness." Bourgeoisie and nobility worked together to establish the Aviz dynasty securely on an independent throne, unlike the lengthy civil wars in France known as the Hundred Years' War, and England as the War of the Roses, where aristocratic factions fought powerfully against a centralised monarchy.

House of Aviz Portuguese dynasty

The House of Aviz known as the Joanine Dynasty was the second dynasty of the kings of Portugal. In 1385, the Interregnum of the 1383-1385 crisis ended when the Cortes of Coimbra proclaimed the Master of the monastic military Order of Aviz as King John I. John was the natural (illegitimate) son of King Peter I and Dona Teresa Lourenço, and so was half-brother to the last king of the Portuguese House of Burgundy or Afonsine Dynasty, Ferdinand I of Portugal. The House of Aviz continued to rule Portugal until Philip II of Spain inherited the Portuguese crown with the Portuguese succession crisis of 1580.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Penguin Pocket On This Day. Penguin Reference Library. 2006. ISBN   0-14-102715-0.
  2. Palmer, Alan; Palmer, Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 109–113. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.