1429

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1429 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1429
MCDXXIX
Ab urbe condita 2182
Armenian calendar 878
ԹՎ ՊՀԸ
Assyrian calendar 6179
Balinese saka calendar 1350–1351
Bengali calendar 836
Berber calendar 2379
English Regnal year 7  Hen. 6   8  Hen. 6
Buddhist calendar 1973
Burmese calendar 791
Byzantine calendar 6937–6938
Chinese calendar 戊申(Earth  Monkey)
4125 or 4065
     to 
己酉年 (Earth  Rooster)
4126 or 4066
Coptic calendar 1145–1146
Discordian calendar 2595
Ethiopian calendar 1421–1422
Hebrew calendar 5189–5190
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1485–1486
 - Shaka Samvat 1350–1351
 - Kali Yuga 4529–4530
Holocene calendar 11429
Igbo calendar 429–430
Iranian calendar 807–808
Islamic calendar 832–833
Japanese calendar Shocho 2 / Eikyō 1
(永享元年)
Javanese calendar 1344–1345
Julian calendar 1429
MCDXXIX
Korean calendar 3762
Minguo calendar 483 before ROC
民前483年
Nanakshahi calendar −39
Thai solar calendar 1971–1972
Tibetan calendar 阳土猴年
(male Earth-Monkey)
1555 or 1174 or 402
     to 
阴土鸡年
(female Earth-Rooster)
1556 or 1175 or 403

Year 1429 ( MCDXXIX ) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Saturday is any non-leap year that begins on Saturday, 1 January, and ends on Saturday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is B. The most recent year of such kind was 2011 and the next one will be 2022 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2017 and 2023 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in May. Leap years starting on Friday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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Events

JanuaryDecember

February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 322 days remaining until the end of the year.

England Country in north-west Europe, part of the United Kingdom

England is a country that is part of the United Kingdom. It shares land borders with Wales to the west and Scotland to the north-northwest. The Irish Sea lies west of England and the Celtic Sea lies to the southwest. England is separated from continental Europe by the North Sea to the east and the English Channel to the south. The country covers five-eighths of the island of Great Britain, which lies in the North Atlantic, and includes over 100 smaller islands, such as the Isles of Scilly and the Isle of Wight.

John Fastolf 14th/15th-century English knight

Sir John Fastolf was a late medieval English landowner and knight who fought in the Hundred Years' War. He has enjoyed a more lasting reputation as the prototype, in some part, of Shakespeare's character Sir John Falstaff. Many historians consider, however, that he deserves to be famous in his own right, not only as a soldier, but as a patron of literature, a writer on strategy and perhaps as an early industrialist.

Date unknown

Turku City in Southwest Finland, Finland

Turku is a city on the southwest coast of Finland at the mouth of the Aura River, in the region of Southwest Finland (Varsinais-Suomi). Turku, as a town, was settled during the 13th century and founded most likely at the end of the 13th century, making it the oldest city in Finland. It quickly became the most important city in Finland, a status it retained for hundreds of years. After Finland became part of the Russian Empire (1809) and the capital of the Grand Duchy of Finland was moved to Helsinki (1812), Turku continued to be the most populous city in Finland until the end of the 1840s, and it remains a regional capital and an important business and cultural center.

Customs authority or agency in a country responsible for collecting customs duties and for controlling the flow of goods

Customs” means the Government Service which is responsible for the administration of Customs law and the collection of duties and taxes and which also has the responsibility for the application of other laws and regulations relating to the importation, exportation, movement or storage of goods.

Grand Canal (China) longest canal or artificial river in the world

The Grand Canal, known to the Chinese as the Jing–Hang Grand Canal, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, is the longest as well as the oldest canal or artificial river in the world. Starting at Beijing, it passes through Tianjin and the provinces of Hebei, Shandong, Jiangsu and Zhejiang to the city of Hangzhou, linking the Yellow River and Yangtze River. The oldest parts of the canal date back to the 5th century BC, but the various sections were first connected during the Sui dynasty. Dynasties in 1271-1633 significantly rebuilt the canal and altered its route to supply their capital Beijing.

Births

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 348 days remaining until the end of the year.

Antonio del Pollaiolo Italian painter, sculptor and engraver

Antonio del Pollaiuolo, also known as Antonio di Jacopo Pollaiuolo or Antonio Pollaiuolo, was an Italian painter, sculptor, engraver and goldsmith during the Italian Renaissance.

Year 1498 (MCDXCVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Giovanni di Bicci de Medici Italian banker

Giovanni di Bicci de' Medici was an Italian banker and founder of the Medici Bank. While other members of the Medici family, such as Chiarissimo di Giambuono de' Medici, who served in the Signoria of Florence in 1201, and Salvestro de' Medici, who was implicated in the Ciompi Revolt of 1378, are of historical interest, it was Giovanni's founding of the family bank that truly initiated the family's rise to power in Florence. He was the father of Cosimo de' Medici, the first Medici ruler of Florence, and an ancestor of other notable Medici rulers, for example, the grandfather of Piero di Cosimo de' Medici; great-grandfather of Lorenzo de' Medici ; and great-great-great-grandfather of Cosimo I de' Medici, Grand Duke of Tuscany.

Year 1360 (MCCCLX) was a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

June 22 is the 173rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 192 days remaining until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

1595 (MDXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1595th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 595th year of the 2nd millennium, the 95th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1590s decade. As of the start of 1595, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1677 Year

1677 (MDCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1677th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 677th year of the 2nd millennium, the 77th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1670s decade. As of the start of 1677, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1736 Year

1736 (MDCCXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, the 1736th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 736th year of the 2nd millennium, the 36th year of the 18th century, and the 7th year of the 1730s decade. As of the start of 1736, the Gregorian calendar was 11 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1459 (MCDLIX) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1461 (MCDLXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1420s decade ran from January 1, 1420, to December 31, 1429.

1544 Year

1544 (MDXLIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar, the 1544th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 544th year of the 2nd millennium, the 44th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1540s decade. As of the start of 1544, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

Year 1428 (MCDXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1259 Year

Year 1259 (MCCLIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. Dating year of the 1257 major volcanic anomaly, to be found in (polar) ice cores, supposed to be the Samalas eruption https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1257_Samalas_eruption

Siege of Orléans Turning point and French Victory in the Hundred Years War

The Siege of Orléans was the watershed of the Hundred Years' War between France and England. It was the French royal army's first major military victory to follow the crushing defeat at the Battle of Agincourt in 1415, and also the first while Joan of Arc was with the army. The siege took place at the pinnacle of English power during the later stages of the war. The city held strategic and symbolic significance to both sides of the conflict. The consensus among contemporaries was that the English regent, John of Lancaster, would have succeeded in realizing his brother the English king Henry V's dream of conquering all of France if Orléans fell. For half a year the English and their French allies appeared to be winning but the siege collapsed nine days after Joan's arrival.

Battle of the Herrings A battle during the Hundred Years War

The Battle of the Herrings, also called the Battle of Rouvray, was a military action near the town of Rouvray in France, just north of Orléans, which took place on 12 February 1429 during the siege of Orléans in the Hundred Years' War. The immediate cause of the battle was an attempt by French and Scottish forces, led by Charles of Bourbon and Sir John Stewart of Darnley, to intercept a supply convoy headed for the English army at Orléans. The English had been laying siege to the city since the previous October. This supply convoy was escorted by an English force under Sir John Fastolf and had been outfitted in Paris, whence it had departed some time earlier. The battle was decisively won by the English.

Battle of Patay A battle during the Hundred Years War

The Battle of Patay was the culminating engagement of the Loire Campaign of the Hundred Years' War between the French and English in north-central France. It was a decisive victory for the French and with heavy losses inflicted on the corps of veteran English longbowmen. This victory was to the French what Agincourt was to the English. Although credited to Joan of Arc, most of the fighting was done by the vanguard of the French army as English units fled, and the main portions of the French army were unable to catch up to the vanguard as it continued to pursue the English for several miles.

Battle of Jargeau

The Battle of Jargeau took place on 11–12 June 1429. It was Joan of Arc's first offensive battle. Shortly after relieving the siege at Orléans, French forces recaptured the neighbouring district along the Loire river. This campaign was the first sustained French offensive in a generation in the Hundred Years' War.

Battle of Beaugency (1429)

The Battle of Beaugency took place on 16 and 17 June 1429. It was one of Joan of Arc's battles. Shortly after relieving the siege at Orléans, French forces recaptured the neighboring district along the Loire river. This campaign was the first sustained French offensive in a generation during the Hundred Years' War.

Hundred Years War (1415–53) third part of the Hundred Years War

The Lancastrian War was the third and final phase of the Anglo-French Hundred Years' War. It lasted from 1415, when King Henry V of England invaded Normandy, to 1453, when the English lost Bordeaux. It followed a long period of peace from the end of the Caroline War in 1389. The phase was named after the House of Lancaster, the ruling house of the Kingdom of England, to which Henry V belonged.

Events from the 1420s in England.

Loire Campaign (1429) A military campaign during the Hundred Years War

The Loire Campaign was a campaign launched by Joan of Arc during the Hundred Years' War. The Loire was cleared of all English and Burgundian troops.

Siege of Paris (1429)

The siege of Paris was an assault undertaken in September 1429 during the Hundred Years' War by the troops of the recently crowned King Charles VII of France, with the notable presence of Joan of Arc, to take the city held by the English and their Burgundian partisans. King Charles's French troops failed to enter Paris, defended by the governor Jean de Villiers de L'Isle-Adam and the provost Simon Morhier, with the support of much of the city's population.

Events from the year 1429 in France

References