1394

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1394 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1394
MCCCXCIV
Ab urbe condita 2147
Armenian calendar 843
ԹՎ ՊԽԳ
Assyrian calendar 6144
Balinese saka calendar 1315–1316
Bengali calendar 801
Berber calendar 2344
English Regnal year 17  Ric. 2   18  Ric. 2
Buddhist calendar 1938
Burmese calendar 756
Byzantine calendar 6902–6903
Chinese calendar 癸酉(Water  Rooster)
4090 or 4030
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
4091 or 4031
Coptic calendar 1110–1111
Discordian calendar 2560
Ethiopian calendar 1386–1387
Hebrew calendar 5154–5155
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1450–1451
 - Shaka Samvat 1315–1316
 - Kali Yuga 4494–4495
Holocene calendar 11394
Igbo calendar 394–395
Iranian calendar 772–773
Islamic calendar 796–797
Japanese calendar Meitoku 5 / Ōei 1
(応永元年)
Javanese calendar 1308–1309
Julian calendar 1394
MCCCXCIV
Korean calendar 3727
Minguo calendar 518 before ROC
民前518年
Nanakshahi calendar −74
Thai solar calendar 1936–1937
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1520 or 1139 or 367
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1521 or 1140 or 368
Consecration of Benedict XIII. Antipope Benedict XIII.jpg
Consecration of Benedict XIII.

Year 1394 ( MCCCXCIV ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

The numeric system represented by Roman numerals originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Roman numerals, as used today, employ seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value, as follows:

A common year starting on Thursday is any non-leap year that begins on Thursday, 1 January, and ends on Thursday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is D. The most recent year of such kind was 2015 and the next one will be 2026 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2010 and 2021 in the obsolete Julian calendar, see below for more. This common year contains the most Friday the 13ths; specifically, the months of February, March, and November. Leap years starting on Sunday share this characteristic. From February until March in this type of year is also the shortest period that occurs within a Friday the 13th.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

January–December

June 11 is the 162nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 203 days remaining until the end of the year.

Republic of Venice former state in in Northeastern Italy (697–1797)

The Republic of Venice or Venetian Republic, traditionally known as La Serenissima was a sovereign state and maritime republic in northeastern Italy, which existed for over a millennium between the 7th century and the 18th century from 697 AD until 1797 AD. It was based in the lagoon communities of the historically prosperous city of Venice, and was a leading European economic and trading power during the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.

Argos Place in Greece

Argos is a city in Argolis, the Peloponnese, Greece and is one of the oldest continuously inhabited cities in the world. It is the largest city in Argolis and a major center for the area.

Date unknown

Ottoman Empire Former empire in Asia, Europe and Africa

The Ottoman Empire, also historically known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the 1453 conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Constantinople capital city of the Eastern Roman or Byzantine Empire, the Latin and the Ottoman Empire

Constantinople was the capital city of the Roman Empire (330–395), of the Byzantine Empire, and also of the brief Crusader state known as the Latin Empire (1204–1261), until finally falling to the Ottoman Empire (1453–1923). It was reinaugurated in 324 from ancient Byzantium as the new capital of the Roman Empire by Emperor Constantine the Great, after whom it was named, and dedicated on 11 May 330. The city was located in what is now the European side and the core of modern Istanbul.

Byzantine Empire Roman Empire during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages

The Byzantine Empire, also referred to as the Eastern Roman Empire and Byzantium, was the continuation of the Roman Empire in its eastern provinces during Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages, when its capital city was Constantinople. It survived the fragmentation and fall of the Western Roman Empire in the 5th century AD and continued to exist for an additional thousand years until it fell to the Ottoman Turks in 1453. During most of its existence, the empire was the most powerful economic, cultural, and military force in Europe. Both the terms "Byzantine Empire" and "Eastern Roman Empire" are historiographical exonyms; its citizens continued to refer to their empire simply as the Roman Empire, or Romania (Ῥωμανία), and to themselves as "Romans".

Births

March 4 is the 63rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 302 days remaining until the end of the year.

Prince Henry the Navigator Portuguese prince patron of voyages of exploration

Infante D. Henrique of Portugal, Duke of Viseu, better known as Prince Henry the Navigator, was a central figure in the early days of the Portuguese Empire and in the 15th-century European maritime discoveries and maritime expansion. Through his administrative direction, he is regarded as the main initiator of what would be known as the Age of Discovery. Henry was the fourth child of the Portuguese king John I and responsible for the early development of Portuguese exploration and maritime trade with other continents through the systematic exploration of Western Africa, the islands of the Atlantic Ocean, and the search for new routes.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

June 25 is the 176th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. There are 189 days remaining until the end of the year.

Dorothea of Montau Hermitess and visionary

Saint Dorotheaof Montau was a hermitess and visionary of 14th century Germany. After centuries of veneration in Central Europe, she was canonized in 1976.

Year 1347 (MCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Sunday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar. 1347 (MCCCXLVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar, the 1347th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 347th year of the 2nd millennium, the 47th year of the 14th century, and the 8th year of the 1340s decade. As of the start of 1347, the Gregorian calendar was 8 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which was the dominant calendar of the time.

Related Research Articles

Year 1389 (MCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

The 1350s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1350, and ended on December 31, 1359.

Year 1400 (MCD) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1374 (MCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1390s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1390, and ended on December 31, 1399.

The 1370s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1370, and ended on December 31, 1379.

Year 1489 (MCDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1358 (MCCCLVIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1378 (MCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1443 (MCDXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Andrew, M. (2016). The Palgrave Literary Dictionary of Chaucer. Springer. p. 11. ISBN   9780230273962.
  2. "Clement (VII) | antipope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved 18 March 2019.