1394

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Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1394 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1394
MCCCXCIV
Ab urbe condita 2147
Armenian calendar 843
ԹՎ ՊԽԳ
Assyrian calendar 6144
Balinese saka calendar 1315–1316
Bengali calendar 801
Berber calendar 2344
English Regnal year 17  Ric. 2   18  Ric. 2
Buddhist calendar 1938
Burmese calendar 756
Byzantine calendar 6902–6903
Chinese calendar 癸酉(Water  Rooster)
4090 or 4030
     to 
甲戌年 (Wood  Dog)
4091 or 4031
Coptic calendar 1110–1111
Discordian calendar 2560
Ethiopian calendar 1386–1387
Hebrew calendar 5154–5155
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1450–1451
 - Shaka Samvat 1315–1316
 - Kali Yuga 4494–4495
Holocene calendar 11394
Igbo calendar 394–395
Iranian calendar 772–773
Islamic calendar 796–797
Japanese calendar Meitoku 5 / Ōei 1
(応永元年)
Javanese calendar 1308–1309
Julian calendar 1394
MCCCXCIV
Korean calendar 3727
Minguo calendar 518 before ROC
民前518年
Nanakshahi calendar −74
Thai solar calendar 1936–1937
Tibetan calendar 阴水鸡年
(female Water-Rooster)
1520 or 1139 or 367
     to 
阳木狗年
(male Wood-Dog)
1521 or 1140 or 368
Consecration of Benedict XIII. Antipope Benedict XIII.jpg
Consecration of Benedict XIII.

Year 1394 ( MCCCXCIV ) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Contents

Events

January–December

Date unknown

Births

Deaths

Related Research Articles

Pope Boniface IX pope

Pope Boniface IX was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 2 November 1389 to his death in 1404. He was the second Pope of the Western Schism. During this time the papal claiments of the Avignon Obedience, antipope Clement VII and Benedict XIII, maintained the Roman Curia in Avignon, under the protection of the French monarchy.

Year 1389 (MCCCLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

Year 1152 (MCLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1100 1100

Year 1100 (MC) was a century leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar. In the proleptic Gregorian calendar, it was a non-leap century year starting on Monday.

Year 1400 (MCD) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar. The year 1400 was not a leap year in the Proleptic Gregorian Calendar.

Year 1374 (MCCCLXXIV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1393 (MCCCXCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

The 1390s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1390, and ended on December 31, 1399.

The 1370s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1370, and ended on December 31, 1379.

1511 1511

Year 1511 (MDXI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1489 (MCDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1367 (MCCCLXVII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1377 (MCCCLXXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1378 (MCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1386 (MCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1443 (MCDXLIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1105 1105

Year 1105 (MCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou Duke of the Normans

Geoffrey V, called the Handsome or the Fair and Plantagenet, was the Count of Anjou, Touraine and Maine by inheritance from 1129, and also Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. His marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, produced a son, Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne as King Henry II (1154–1189) and was the first of the Plantagenet dynasty to rule England; the name "Plantagenet" was taken from Geoffrey's epithet. Geoffrey's ancestral domain of Anjou gave rise to the name Angevin for three kings of England, and what became known as the Angevin Empire in the 12th century.

1400s (decade) decade

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Geoffrey Chaucer (1866). The Poetical Works of Geoffrey Chaucer. Bell and Daldy. pp.  37.
  2. Manuel II Palaeologus (Emperor of the East) (1985). Manuel II Palaeologus: Funeral Oration on His Brother Theodore. Association for Byzantine Research. p. 19.
  3. Zosa Szajkowski; Soza Szajkowski (1970). Jews and the French Revolutions of 1789, 1830 and 1848 . KTAV Publishing House, Inc. pp.  220. ISBN   978-0-87068-000-7.
  4. Sir Frederick Dixon HARTLAND (1854). A chronological dictionary or index to the genealogical chart, etc. p. 14.
  5. Vladislav Boskovic (July 3, 2009). Some Notes on Marko Kraljevic (Prince Marko). GRIN Verlag. p. 3. ISBN   978-3-640-36481-7.
  6. John Cleave (2008). Istanbul: City of Two Continents. Editions Didier Millet. p. 10. ISBN   978-981-4217-52-1.
  7. Anuario de estudios medievales. Instituto de Historia Medieval de España. 1990. p. 157.
  8. Fossier, Robert; Jacques Verger; Robert Mantran; Catherine Asdracha; Charles de La Roncière (1987). Storia del medioevo III: Il tempo delle crisi (1250–1520). Giulio Einaudi editore. p. 368. ISBN   88-06-58404-9.
  9. Adressbuch ... 8960 Kempten, Allgäu: bearb. nach d. amtl. Unterlagen d. Stadtverwaltung u. eigenen Erhebungen d. Verl. 1986. Bleicher. p. 26.
  10. Richard Henry Major (1877). The Discoveries of Prince Henry the Navigator, and Their Results; Being the Narrative of the Discovery by Sea, Within One Century, of More Than Half the World. Sampson Low, Marston, Searle and Rivington. pp.  20.
  11. Panton, James (2011). Historical Dictionary of the British Monarchy. Scarecrow Press. p. 370. ISBN   978-0-8108-7497-8.
  12. Gordon Donaldson; Robert S. Morpeth (1973). Who's who in Scottish history. Blackwell. p. 33.
  13. Henry Ansgar Kelly (1986). Chaucer and the Cult of Saint Valentine. BRILL. p. 146. ISBN   90-04-07849-5.
  14. Great Britain. Court of Chancery (1918). Inquisitions Post Mortem Relating to Yorkshire: Of the Reigns of Henry IV and Henry V. Society. p. 112.
  15. André Vauchez; Michael Lapidge (2000). Encyclopedia of the Middle Ages: A-J. Fitzroy Dearborn Publishers, Incorporated. p. 448.
  16. Plantagenet Ancestry: A Study In Colonial And Medieval Families, 2nd Edition, 2011. Douglas Richardson. p. 352. ISBN   978-1-4610-4513-7.
  17. Andrew, M. (2016). The Palgrave Literary Dictionary of Chaucer. Springer. p. 11. ISBN   9780230273962.
  18. "Clement (VII) | antipope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved March 18, 2019.