1466

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1466 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1466
MCDLXVI
Ab urbe condita 2219
Armenian calendar 915
ԹՎ ՋԺԵ
Assyrian calendar 6216
Balinese saka calendar 1387–1388
Bengali calendar 873
Berber calendar 2416
English Regnal year 5  Edw. 4   6  Edw. 4
Buddhist calendar 2010
Burmese calendar 828
Byzantine calendar 6974–6975
Chinese calendar 乙酉(Wood  Rooster)
4162 or 4102
     to 
丙戌年 (Fire  Dog)
4163 or 4103
Coptic calendar 1182–1183
Discordian calendar 2632
Ethiopian calendar 1458–1459
Hebrew calendar 5226–5227
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1522–1523
 - Shaka Samvat 1387–1388
 - Kali Yuga 4566–4567
Holocene calendar 11466
Igbo calendar 466–467
Iranian calendar 844–845
Islamic calendar 870–871
Japanese calendar Kanshō 7 / Bunshō 1
(文正元年)
Javanese calendar 1382–1383
Julian calendar 1466
MCDLXVI
Korean calendar 3799
Minguo calendar 446 before ROC
民前446年
Nanakshahi calendar −2
Thai solar calendar 2008–2009
Tibetan calendar 阴木鸡年
(female Wood-Rooster)
1592 or 1211 or 439
     to 
阳火狗年
(male Fire-Dog)
1593 or 1212 or 440

Year 1466 ( MCDLXVI ) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. It is one of eight years (CE) to contain each Roman numeral once (1000(M)+(-100(C)+500(D))+50(L)+10(X)+5(V)+1(I) = 1466).

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeric system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A common year starting on Wednesday is any non-leap year that begins on Wednesday, 1 January, and ends on Wednesday, 31 December. Its dominical letter hence is E. The most recent year of such kind was 2014, and the next one will be 2025 in the in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2009, 2015, and 2026 in the obsolete Julian calendar. The century year, 1800, was also a common year starting on Wednesday in the Gregorian calendar, see below for more. Any common year that starts on Wednesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this common year occurs in June. Leap years starting on Tuesday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 46 BC, was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 45 BC, by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

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German language West Germanic language

German is a West Germanic language that is mainly spoken in Central Europe. It is the most widely spoken and official or co-official language in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, South Tyrol (Italy), the German-speaking Community of Belgium, and Liechtenstein. It is also one of the three official languages of Luxembourg and a co-official language in the Opole Voivodeship in Poland. The languages which are most similar to German are the other members of the West Germanic language branch: Afrikaans, Dutch, English, the Frisian languages, Low German/Low Saxon, Luxembourgish, and Yiddish. There are also strong similarities in vocabulary with Danish, Norwegian and Swedish, although those belong to the North Germanic group. German is the second most widely spoken Germanic language, after English.

Saint Peters Church, Fritzlar Church in Fritzlar, Germany

Saint Peter's Church is a Roman Catholic church and Minor basilica located in the small German town of Fritzlar. It is often colloquially referred to as a cathedral, due to its great size.

Births

February 11 is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 323 days remain until the end of the year.

Elizabeth of York Queen of England

Elizabeth of York was the wife of Henry VII, and thus the first Tudor queen. She was the daughter of Edward IV and his wife Elizabeth Woodville, and niece of Richard III. She married Henry VII in 1486, after being detained by him the previous year following the latter's victory at the Battle of Bosworth Field, which started the last phase of the Wars of the Roses. Together, Elizabeth and Henry had a total of four sons, three of whom died before their father, leaving their brother, Henry VIII, to succeed his father as king.

Henry VII of England King of England, 1485–1509

Henry VII was the King of England and Lord of Ireland from his seizure of the crown on 22 August 1485 to his death on 21 April 1509. He was the first monarch of the House of Tudor.

Deaths

February 23 is the 54th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 311 days remain until the end of the year.

Majapahit empire based on the island of Java from 1293 to around 1500

The Majapahit Empire was a thalassocracy in Southeast Asia, based on the island of Java, that existed from 1293 to circa 1500. Majapahit reached its peak of glory during the era of Hayam Wuruk, whose reign from 1350 to 1389 was marked by conquest which extended through Southeast Asia. His achievement is also credited to his prime minister, Gajah Mada. According to the Nagarakretagama (Desawarñana) written in 1365, Majapahit was an empire of 98 tributaries, stretching from Sumatra to New Guinea; consisting of present-day Indonesia, Singapore, Malaysia, Brunei, southern Thailand, East Timor, Sulu Archipelago and other parts of the Philippines, although the true nature of Majapahit sphere of influence is still the subject of studies among historians.

March 6 is the 65th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 300 days remain until the end of the year.

Related Research Articles

Francesco I Sforza Italian condottiero, the founder of the Sforza dynasty in Milan, Italy

Francesco I Sforza was an Italian condottiero, the founder of the Sforza dynasty in Milan, Italy, and was the fourth Duke of Milan from 1450 until his death. He was the brother of Alessandro, whom he often fought alongside.

House of Sforza noble family of the Italian Renaissance, dukes of Milan


The House of Sforza was a ruling family of Renaissance Italy, based in Milan. They acquired the Duchy of Milan from the previously-ruling Visconti family in the mid-15th century, and lost it to the Spanish Habsburgs about a century later.

1520 Year

Year 1520 (MDXX) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1469 (MCDLXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1473 (MCDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1536 Year

Year 1536 (MDXXXVI) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1483 (MCDLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar).

1584 Year

1584 (MDLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a leap year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1584th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 584th year of the 2nd millennium, the 84th year of the 16th century, and the 5th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1584, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1502 Year

Year 1502 (MDII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1452 (MCDLII) was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1418 (MCDXVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1433 (MCDXXXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Ludovico Sforza Duke of Milan

Ludovico Maria Sforza, was Duke of Milan from 1494, following the death of his nephew Gian Galeazzo Sforza, until 1499. A member of the Sforza family, he was the fourth son of Francesco I Sforza. He was famed as a patron of Leonardo da Vinci and other artists, and presided over the final and most productive stage of the Milanese Renaissance. He is probably best known as the man who commissioned The Last Supper.

Filippo Maria Visconti Duke of Milan

Filippo Maria Visconti was the duke of Milan from 1412 to 1447.

Francesco, the Italian version of the personal name "Francis", is the most common given name among males in Italy, and is the given name of:

Francesco Sforza (1401–1466), was the first Duke of Milan of the Sforza dynasty.

Francesco II may refer to:

References

  1. Burke, James (1978). Connections. London: Macmillan. ISBN   0-333-24827-9.
  2. "Moctezuma II" (in Spanish). Biografias y Vidas. Retrieved June 1, 2019. |
  3. "Francesco Sforza | duke of Milan [1401–1466]". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved July 22, 2018.
  4. "Donatello | Italian sculptor". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved July 22, 2018.