1400

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1400 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1400
MCD
Ab urbe condita 2153
Armenian calendar 849
ԹՎ ՊԽԹ
Assyrian calendar 6150
Balinese saka calendar 1321–1322
Bengali calendar 807
Berber calendar 2350
English Regnal year 1  Hen. 4   2  Hen. 4
Buddhist calendar 1944
Burmese calendar 762
Byzantine calendar 6908–6909
Chinese calendar 己卯(Earth  Rabbit)
4096 or 4036
     to 
庚辰年 (Metal  Dragon)
4097 or 4037
Coptic calendar 1116–1117
Discordian calendar 2566
Ethiopian calendar 1392–1393
Hebrew calendar 5160–5161
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1456–1457
 - Shaka Samvat 1321–1322
 - Kali Yuga 4500–4501
Holocene calendar 11400
Igbo calendar 400–401
Iranian calendar 778–779
Islamic calendar 802–803
Japanese calendar Ōei 7
(応永7年)
Javanese calendar 1314–1315
Julian calendar 1400
MCD
Korean calendar 3733
Minguo calendar 512 before ROC
民前512年
Nanakshahi calendar −68
Thai solar calendar 1942–1943
Tibetan calendar 阴土兔年
(female Earth-Rabbit)
1526 or 1145 or 373
     to 
阳金龙年
(male Iron-Dragon)
1527 or 1146 or 374

Year 1400 ( MCD ) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Thursday is any year with 366 days that begins on Thursday 1 January, and ends on Friday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are DC, such as the years 1880, 1920, 1948, 1976, 2004, 2032, 2060, and 2088, in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 1988, 2016, and 2044 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Monday, Wednesday or Thursday has two Friday the 13ths. This leap year contains two Friday the 13ths in February and August.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was designed with the aid of Greek mathematicians and Greek astronomers such as Sosigenes of Alexandria.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

January is the first month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars and the first of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The first day of the month is known as New Year's Day. It is, on average, the coldest month of the year within most of the Northern Hemisphere and the warmest month of the year within most of the Southern Hemisphere. In the Southern hemisphere, January is the seasonal equivalent of July in the Northern hemisphere and vice versa.

Henry IV of England 15th-century King of England

Henry IV, also known as Henry Bolingbroke, was King of England from 1399 to 1413. He asserted the claim of his grandfather King Edward III, a maternal grandson of Philip IV of France, to the Kingdom of France.

The Epiphany Rising was a failed rebellion against Henry IV of England in late December 1399 and early January 1400.

Date unknown

Timur Turco-Mongol ruler

Shuja-ud-din Timur, sometimes spelled Taimur and historically best known as Amir Timur or Tamerlane, was a Turco-Mongol Persianate conqueror who founded the Timurid Empire in and around modern-day Iran and Central Asia, becoming the first ruler of the Timurid dynasty. As an undefeated commander, he is widely regarded to be one of the greatest military leaders and tacticians in history. Timur is also considered as a great patron of art and architecture, as he interacted with intellectuals such as Ibn Khaldun and Hafiz-i Abru. He is often credited with the invention of chess. According to John Joseph Saunders, Timur was "the product of an Islamized and Iranized society", and not steppe nomadic.

Ottoman Empire Former empire in Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa

The Ottoman Empire, historically known to its inhabitants and the Eastern world as Rome (Rûm), and known in Western Europe as the Turkish Empire or simply Turkey, was a state that controlled much of Southeast Europe, Western Asia and North Africa between the 14th and early 20th centuries. It was founded at the end of the 13th century in northwestern Anatolia in the town of Söğüt by the Oghuz Turkish tribal leader Osman I. Although initially the dynasty was of Turkic origin, it was thoroughly Persianised in terms of language, culture, literature and habits. After 1354, the Ottomans crossed into Europe, and with the conquest of the Balkans, the Ottoman beylik was transformed into a transcontinental empire. The Ottomans ended the Byzantine Empire with the 1453 conquest of Constantinople by Mehmed the Conqueror.

Mamluk Sultanate (Cairo) Cairo based sultanate

The Mamluk Sultanate was a medieval realm spanning Egypt, the Levant, and Hejaz. It lasted from the overthrow of the Ayyubid dynasty until the Ottoman conquest of Egypt in 1517. Historians have traditionally broken the era of Mamlūk rule into two periods—one covering 1250–1382, the other, 1382–1517. Western historians call the former the "Baḥrī" period and the latter the "Burjī" due to the political dominance of the regimes known by these names during the respective eras. Contemporary Muslim historians refer to the same divisions as the "Turkic" and "Circassian" periods in order to stress the change in the ethnic origins of the majority of Mamlūks.

Births

January 13 is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 352 days remain until the end of the year.

Constable of Portugal was an office created by King Ferdinand I of Portugal in 1382, to substitute the Alferes-Mor as the head of the Military. It was also referred as the Constable of the Kingdom.

Year 1442 (MCDXLII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Deaths

Richard II of England Richard II King of England.jpg
Richard II of England
Geoffrey Chaucer Geoffrey Chaucer (17th century).jpg
Geoffrey Chaucer

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Year 1572 (MDLXXII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1326 (MCCCXXVI) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1566 Year

Year 1566 (MDLXVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1617 Year

1617 (MDCXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1617th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 617th year of the 2nd millennium, the 17th year of the 17th century, and the 8th year of the 1610s decade. As of the start of 1617, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1473 (MCDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1540 Year

Year 1540 (MDXL) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

The 1380s was a decade of the Julian Calendar which began on January 1, 1380, and ended on December 31, 1389.

Year 1461 (MCDLXI) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1591 Year

1591 (MDXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar. As of the start of 1591, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar.

Year 1460 (MCDLX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1385 (MCCCLXXXV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1395 (MCCCXCV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1401 (MCDI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1408 (MCDVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1306 (MCCCVI) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Julian calendar.

Elizabeth of York, Duchess of Suffolk English noblewoman

Elizabeth of York, Duchess of Suffolk also known as Elizabeth Plantagenet was the sixth child and third daughter of Richard Plantagenet, 3rd Duke of York and Cecily Neville. She was thus a sister of King Edward IV and of King Richard III.

Events from the 1400s in England.

The 1400s ran from January 1, 1400, to December 31, 1409.

References

  1. Palmer, Alan; Veronica (1992). The Chronology of British History. London: Century Ltd. pp. 115–117. ISBN   0-7126-5616-2.