1468

Last updated

Millennium: 2nd millennium
Centuries:
Decades:
Years:
1468 in various calendars
Gregorian calendar 1468
MCDLXVIII
Ab urbe condita 2221
Armenian calendar 917
ԹՎ ՋԺԷ
Assyrian calendar 6218
Balinese saka calendar 1389–1390
Bengali calendar 875
Berber calendar 2418
English Regnal year 7  Edw. 4   8  Edw. 4
Buddhist calendar 2012
Burmese calendar 830
Byzantine calendar 6976–6977
Chinese calendar 丁亥(Fire  Pig)
4164 or 4104
     to 
戊子年 (Earth  Rat)
4165 or 4105
Coptic calendar 1184–1185
Discordian calendar 2634
Ethiopian calendar 1460–1461
Hebrew calendar 5228–5229
Hindu calendars
 - Vikram Samvat 1524–1525
 - Shaka Samvat 1389–1390
 - Kali Yuga 4568–4569
Holocene calendar 11468
Igbo calendar 468–469
Iranian calendar 846–847
Islamic calendar 872–873
Japanese calendar Ōnin 2
(応仁2年)
Javanese calendar 1384–1385
Julian calendar 1468
MCDLXVIII
Korean calendar 3801
Minguo calendar 444 before ROC
民前444年
Nanakshahi calendar 0
Thai solar calendar 2010–2011
Tibetan calendar 阴火猪年
(female Fire-Pig)
1594 or 1213 or 441
     to 
阳土鼠年
(male Earth-Rat)
1595 or 1214 or 442

Year 1468 ( MCDLXVIII ) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar.

Roman numerals Numbers in the Roman numeral system

Roman numerals are a numeral system that originated in ancient Rome and remained the usual way of writing numbers throughout Europe well into the Late Middle Ages. Numbers in this system are represented by combinations of letters from the Latin alphabet. Modern usage employs seven symbols, each with a fixed integer value:

A leap year starting on Friday is any year with 366 days that begins on Friday 1 January and ends on Saturday 31 December. Its dominical letters hence are CB, such as the years 1808, 1836, 1864, 1892, 1904, 1932, 1960, 1988, 2016, 2044, 2072, and 2112 in the Gregorian calendar or, likewise, 2000 and 2028 in the obsolete Julian calendar. Any leap year that starts on Tuesday, Friday or Saturday has only one Friday the 13th; The only Friday the 13th in this leap year occurs in May. Common years starting on Saturday share this characteristic.

The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar in 708 AUC (46 BC/BCE), was a reform of the Roman calendar. It took effect on 1 January 709 AUC (45 BC/BCE), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII.

Contents

Events

JanuaryDecember

June 30 is the 181st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 184 days remain until the end of the year.

Catherine Cornaro Queen of Cyprus

Catherine Cornaro was the last monarch of the Kingdom of Cyprus. She was queen consort of Cyprus by marriage to James II of Cyprus, regent of Cyprus during the minority of her son James III of Cyprus in 1473–1474, and finally queen regnant of Cyprus. She reigned from 26 August 1474 to 26 February 1489 and was declared a "Daughter of Saint Mark" in order that the Republic of Venice could claim control of Cyprus after the death of her husband, James II.

James II of Cyprus King of Cyprus, Jerusalem and Armenia

James II was the penultimate King of Cyprus, reigning from 1463 until his death.

Date unknown

House of Lancaster English noble family

The House of Lancaster was the name of two cadet branches of the royal House of Plantagenet. The first house was created when Henry III of England created the Earldom of Lancaster—from which the house was named—for his second son Edmund Crouchback in 1267. Edmund had already been created Earl of Leicester in 1265 and was granted the lands and privileges of Simon de Montfort, 6th Earl of Leicester, after de Montfort's death and attainder at the end of the Second Barons' War. When Edmund's son Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster, inherited his father-in-law's estates and title of Earl of Lincoln he became at a stroke the most powerful nobleman in England, with lands throughout the kingdom and the ability to raise vast private armies to wield power at national and local levels. This brought him—and Henry, his younger brother—into conflict with their cousin Edward II of England, leading to Thomas's execution. Henry inherited Thomas's titles and he and his son, who was also called Henry, gave loyal service to Edward's son—Edward III of England.

Harlech Castle castle in Harlech, Gwynedd, Wales

Harlech Castle, located in Harlech, Gwynedd, Wales, is a medieval fortification, constructed atop a spur of rock close to the Irish Sea. It was built by Edward I during his invasion of Wales between 1282 and 1289 at the relatively modest cost of £8,190. Over the next few centuries, the castle played an important part in several wars, withstanding the siege of Madog ap Llywelyn between 1294–95, but falling to Owain Glyndŵr in 1404. It then became Glyndŵr's residence and military headquarters for the remainder of the uprising until being recaptured by English forces in 1409. During the 15th century Wars of the Roses, Harlech was held by the Lancastrians for seven years, before Yorkist troops forced its surrender in 1468, a siege memorialised in the song Men of Harlech. Following the outbreak of the English Civil War in 1642, the castle was held by forces loyal to Charles I, holding out until 1647 when it became the last fortification to surrender to the Parliamentary armies. In the 21st century the ruined castle is managed by Cadw, the Welsh Government's historic environment service, as a tourist attraction.

Edward IV of England 15th-century King of England

Edward IV was King of England from 4 March 1461 to 3 October 1470, and again from 11 April 1471 until his death. He was the first Yorkist king. The first half of his rule was marred by the violence associated with the Wars of the Roses, but he overcame the Lancastrian challenge to the throne at Tewkesbury in 1471 to reign in peace until his sudden death. Before becoming king, he was Duke of York, Earl of March, Earl of Cambridge and Earl of Ulster.

Births

February 29, also known as leap day or leap year day, is a date added to most years that are divisible by 4, such as 2016, 2020, and 2024. A leap day is added in various solar calendars, including the Gregorian calendar standard in most of the world. Lunisolar calendars instead add a leap or intercalary month.

Pope Paul III Pope

Pope Paul III, born Alessandro Farnese, was head of the Catholic Church and ruler of the Papal States from 13 October 1534 to his death in 1549.

1549 Year

Year 1549 (MDXLIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar. In the Kingdom of England, it was known as "The Year of the Many-Headed Monster", because of the unusually high number of rebellions which occurred in the country.

Deaths

Johannes Gutenberg Gutenberg.jpg
Johannes Gutenberg

January 17 is the 17th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. 348 days remain until the end of the year.

Skanderbeg Albanian hero

George Castriot 6 May 1405 – 17 January 1468), known as Skanderbeg, was an Albanian nobleman and military commander who led a rebellion against the Ottoman Empire in what is today Albania, North Macedonia, Republic of Kosovo, Montenegro and Serbia.

Year 1403 (MCDIII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Related Research Articles

1568 Year

Year 1568 (MDLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1473 (MCDLXXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1585 Year

1585 (MDLXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, the 1585th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 585th year of the 2nd millennium, the 85th year of the 16th century, and the 6th year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1585, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

Year 1458 (MCDLVIII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1483 (MCDLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar).

Year 1478 (MCDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

1589 Year

1589 (MDLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar and a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar, the 1589th year of the Common Era (CE) and Anno Domini (AD) designations, the 589th year of the 2nd millennium, the 89th year of the 16th century, and the 10th and last year of the 1580s decade. As of the start of 1589, the Gregorian calendar was 10 days ahead of the Julian calendar, which remained in localized use until 1923.

1580 Year

Year 1580 (MDLXXX) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar, and a leap year starting on Tuesday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1579 Year

Year 1579 (MDLXXIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar, and a common year starting on Monday of the Proleptic Gregorian calendar.

1578 Year

Year 1578 (MDLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

1563 Year

Year 1563 (MDLXIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1524 Year

Year 1524 (MDXXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1518 Year

Year 1518 (MDXVIII) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

1510 Year

Year 1510 (MDX) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Julian calendar.

1467 Year

Year 1467 (MCDLXVII) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1456 (MCDLVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1392 (MCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1399 (MCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1434 (MCDXXXIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

Year 1445 (MCDXLV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar.

References

  1. "Paul III | pope". Encyclopedia Britannica. Retrieved April 22, 2019.
  2. Qutbuddin, Tahera (2018). "Idrīs ʿImād al-Dīn" . In Fleet, Kate; Krämer, Gudrun; Matringe, Denis; Nawas, John; Rowson, Everett (eds.). Encyclopaedia of Islam, THREE. Brill Online. ISSN   1873-9830.